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Full text of "A genealogy of Moses and Susanna Coates who settled in Pennsylvania in 1717, and their descendants; (1906)"

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A GENEALOGY 



OF 



Moses and Susanna Coates 

WHO SETTLED IN PENNSYLVANIA 
IN 1717, AND 

THEIR DESCENDANTS 



WITH BRIEF INTRODUCTORY NOTES 
OF FAMILIES OF SAME NAME. 

jfCS- lJ-Wa 

AN ANCIENT COATES MOTTO 

*i Jp> ilfd it;?to)$g>tkose ivJio bdiev&that, 
any vtfio r#rk ndt\ahoM thiif- wirty \t\rigin\ 

care little for anything higher?" ' \i 



J ^rW^^r 



COMPILED BY 

TRUMAN COATES, M.D. 

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



1. Res., Dr. Truman and Sarah B. Coates, Oxford, Pa. (Frontispiece.) 

2. Carlow Metting House. — Exterior. 

Carlow Meeting House.— Interior Opposite page 14 

3. Cor., old Deed, showing hand-writing of Moses and Susanna Coates. 
Pikeland Friend's burial ground, Chester Co,, Pa, Opposite page 22 

4. Radnor F. M, H. 

East Cain F. M. H " " 25 

5. Res. Thomas Coates, 1741. 

Res. Samuel Coates " " 3 2 

6. Warrick Coates, Sr. 

Levi Coates " " 38 

7. Hartt G. Coates. 

Eliza Coates " " 5° 

8. Warrick Coates, Jr. 

Ruthanna Coates " " 5 1 

9. Susanna P. Darlington. 

Sarah Wood " " 53 

10. Abigail Hoopes. 

Philena Lynch lt " 54 

11. George Coates. 

Joseph R. Coates " " 60 

12. Sarah Walker. 

Joseph C. Walker " " 62 

13. Ellis Coates. 

Abigail Coates " " 64 

14. Truman Coates, M. D. 

Sarah B. Coates " " 66 

15. Res. Samuel Coates. 

Clock of Moses Coates, founder of Coatesville, Pa " " 87 

16. Res. Moses Coates, No. 1, Coatesville, Pa. 

Res. Moses Coates, No. 2, Coatesville, Pa " " 91 

17. Res, Jessie Coates, M. D. 

Jesse Coates, M, D " " 92 

18. Caleb Coates. 

Esther Virginia Mather i( " 123 

19. Sarah Coates. 

Elizabeth (Coates) Cowgill " "' 161 

20. Coffee Pot and dishes of Moses Coates, Jr. 

Chair etc., of Thomas Coates, son of M. C, Jr " " 176 

21. Francis Coates. 

Mabel E. Coates " " 225 

22. Fallowfield F. M. H, and B. G " " 252 



TOPICAL INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Prelude 5 

Introduction 7 

Letter, from Dr. Carr 11 

PART ONE. 

Moses and Susanna (Weldon) Coates 12 

Extracts from Providence and other Meetings in Ireland 12 

Certificate for Moses Coates from Carlow M. Mtg., Ireland, to 

Friends in America 14 

Letter from J. Beuley Beale 15 

Notes of the Emigrants 15 

Explanations 18 

Children of Moses and Susanna Coates 17 

Historical Notes 19 

Letter, from Lavenia W. Shafer 21 

Letter, from Hettie Y. Hallowell 22 

Copy of Deed, 1828 22 

Haverford Monthly Meeting Records 25 

Gwynedd Monthly Meeting Records 27 

Will of Moses Coates, Sr 27 

Goods and Chatties of Moses Coates, Sr 29 

"Moses Coates," poem 30 

PART TWO. 

Thomas and Sarah (Miller) Coates 32 

Marriage Certificate of Thomas Coates and Sarah Miller 34 

Gwynedd M. Mtg. Records 36 

Bradford M. Mtg. Records 36 

Letter of Thomas Coates, son of Samuel 3S 

Accounts, Warrick Coates, Sr 39 

Will of Warrick Coates, Sr 41 

Marriage Certificate of Samuel Coates and Margaret Cherrington... 45 

Marriage Certificate, Warrick Coates, Jr., and Ruthanna Cook 62 

Brief of Titles of farm of Thomas Coates, East Cain Township, 

Chester Co., Pa 81 

Letter from J. Andrew Seltzer 83 

Copy of Lease of Limestone Land in East Cain Township, Warick 

Miller to Thos. Coates 84 

PART THREE. 

Samuel and Elizabeth (Mendenhall) Coates 87 

Journey to Indian Country, by Isaac Coates 93 

2 



Topical Index. 3 

Poem, by Jesse Kersey, on death of his wife, Elizabeth (Coates).... 1 10 

Notes on Life of Jesse Kersey 13 1 

Deed for land of Isaac Coates and wife to John Jones 132 

Brief of Titles for land in East Cain Township 135 

"How I went to Smash," poem by Elmer Ruan Coates 138 

"The Little Quaker Girl," poem by Elmer Ruan Coates 140 

"The Postman," poem by Elmer Ruan Coates 141 

Obituary of Elmer Ruan Coates 144 

In Memorium of Elmer Ruan Coates 144 

Letter of Amos Coates MS 

Notes on Life of Lindley Coates 14 8 

Letter of Sarah H. Coates 15° 

Letter of George Spencer 15 1 

PART FOUR. 

Moses Coates, Jr., and Priscilla (Hutchinson) Coates 153 

Notes of Sarah (Coates) Robinson and others 155 

Some Revolutionary Experiences of the Coates family 157 

Marriage Certificate of Priscilla Coates and Jonathan Evans 16C 

Marriage Certificate of John Hutchinson Coates and Hannah Long- 

streth 164 

Rebecca L. Price (Volunteer Nurse) 173 

Letter from Susanna Coats 174 

"Moses Coates," poem by Moses Robinson 186 

From Journal of Sarah W. (Coates) Pennypacker 187 

Memoir of Sarah W. (Coates) Pennypacker 230 

PART FIVE. 

Elizabeth Coates and John Mendenhall 236 

Bradford M. Mtg. Records 236 

Letters from William R. Clark " 237, 238 

PART SIX. 

William Coates 2^1 

PART SEVEN. 

Jonathan and Jane (Longstreth) Coates 242 

Gwynedd M. Mtg Records 242 

Bradford M. Mtg. Records 242 

Uwchlan M. Mtg. Records 243 

Gunpowder M. Mtg. Records 243, 244 

Fairfax M. Mtg. Records 243 

Indian Springs M. Mtsr. Records 244 

Baltimore M. Mtg. Records 244 



4 Topical Index. 

PART EIGHT. 

Aaron and Rachel (Eastburn) Coates 245 

Gwynedd M. Mtg 245 

Goshen M. Mtg. Records 245 

Radnor M. Mtg. Records 246 

Redstone M. Mtg. Records 246, 247 

Letter of Timothy Kirk 247 

Letter of Jonathan Cope 250 

PART NINE. 

Benjamin and Ann (Longstreth) Coates 251 

Goshen M. Mtg, Records 251 

Bradford M. Mtg. Records 252, 253 

Fallowfield M. Mtg. Records 254, 255 

Sadsbury M. Mtg. Records 254 

Account of Reunion of the Coates Family held in Oxford Park, 

9 mo. 6, 1900 258 

Reports of Preliminary Meetings 258 

Addresses: Pres. J. R. T. Coates' Remarks 260 

"Our Ancestors," Dr. Truman Coates 261 

"Growth of Our Country," Samuel Coates 264 

"Genealogy of the Coate^ Family," Ella W. Thomas 263 

Concluding Events 270 

List of names of those in attendance at the Reunion 273 

Coates' Arms 279 

Explanation of terms 280 

Addenda: Marriage Certificate of Warrick and Elenor (Pusey) Coates 281 

Data of the Pusey family 282 

Late Marriages, Deaths, Etc 283 

Index of Names 284 



PRELUDE. 

With reverence for the past and interest for the present, 
may we find in the perusal of this volume that which is of no 
great import to the rest of the world, but should be of significance 
to us, through which we are brought together by simple claim of 
kinship, strangers many, but cousins, all. 

To the name we commemorate in the following pages has 
been nourished the tastes that we would all do well to cultivate. 
It is peculiarly fitting that we should come as pilgrims, to lay our 
offerings upon the shrine of family love, and to build, if we will, 
an altar of family pride — the pride of noble name, from the fact 
we were, and are, as a class, those whose beliefs and ambitions 
will ever stand for peaceful citizenship and loyalty to our Maker, 
exemplified by our love for our fellowman. 

We may be profoundly grateful to be able to say that our 
ancestors, of whom we are permitted to know something of nine 
successive generations, seem to have belonged to that class of 
society which has given birth to the best thought and highest 
achievements of the nation's workers in brain and brawn for the 
real advancement of the world's progress and uplifting of humanity 

They were not, nor are we, burdened with a plethora of this 
world's goods; but the first wealth, health, seems to have been 
liberally showered upon the heads of our sturdy ancestors, chiefly 
of yeoman birth. 

We have been told that our ancestors were among those 
driven from England to Ireland, the result of religious persecu- 
tion — call this the undefiled work of God, who can. When they 
found at last, a home in the state of Pennsylvania, in the fertile 
valley of the Schuylkill, where now stands the northern part of 
the town of Phoenixville, but then a wilderness, with the "Red 
Man" for their common, and almost only neighbor, ; the} r 

(5) 



6 Prelude. 

finally founded a home free from secular bigotry and burdens 
from the Crown, where the Stars and Stripes have waved in glory 
for more than one and a quarter centuries. Where the believers 
of the ' 'Inward Light," and the followers of George Fox might, 
and did, and yet do worship freely and unmolestedly the Divine 
Father according to the dictates of a guiltless conscience. For 
our emmigrant ancestors were Friends, and were married in 
Friends' Meeting in the town of Cashel, County Tipperary, 
Province of Munster, Ireland, 3 mo. 1, 1715, and not a few of 
their descendants have kept to the faith of their fathers unto the 
seventh and eighth generations. 

Spirits of our ancestors — Moses and Susanna — we trust you , 
too, are with us now, and from your higher spiritual vision, look 
with pleasure upon your descendants as children, all; with their 
abodes of comfort, intelligence, and refinement, as the results of 
your hard-earned efforts for your progeny from the virgin soil of 
your newly-made home in this free country. 

And wilt thou, Oh Father of us all. let thy blessing fall upon 
this branch of thy heritage: — from the sweet-faced child, with 
whom the business of life is to be happy, to the youth, who has not 
passed the blessed land of revery and dreams; and upon us, who 
have ceased to dream, but scarcely learned to live; and upon 
those dear ones whose placid faces, made more lovely by the 
purifying influences of scores of years. Teach us all to not dread 
the coming glow of the western horizon which portends a brighter 
day. May we all be worthy of such a heritage, and while we ac- 
cept the opportunities for broader culture that this age affords, 
let us emulate that perfect integrity, the frugal humility, and 
greatness of soul that distinguished our lines in days gone by. 

T. C. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The name "Coates" is of ancient origin, and was written in 
earliest records as DeCote, a Norman name. The letter "a," oc- 
curs in the name as early as 1331, when, in the 4th year of Edward 
III, William DeCoates was Lord of Cotes DeVille, in Leistershire, 
England; and in 1347, the 20th year of Edward III, John 
DeCoates, with an "a," held lands here of Bishop of Lincoln, al- 
though the name was generally written Cotes, without the "a" 
until the 17th Century. 

The name in Scotland, is Coats, omitting the "e," and may 
be from another source, yet many proper names, from their origin, 
have been transformed into various forms of autography, and not 
unlikely the different forms of spelling this name were derived 
from one common source. 

As to the origin — Lower, in his "Essay on English Sur- 
names," gives Coates as one of the names taken from habiliments 
of the person. Guppy, in "Homes of Family Names," fonnd 
Coateses in Buckinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, North- 
umberland, Oxfordshire and Yorkshire. There is a Coates Castle 
in Sussex, England. 

The Edinburgh Directory for 1894 gives three names spelled 
"Coates," and three, "Coats." 

There are landed proprietors named Coates in Yorkshire, 
Shropshire, and Monmouthshire, England; Radnorshire, Wales; 
and Antrim and Kildare Counties, Ireland. The name is born 
by three officers in the British Army who have won the "Dis- 
tinguished Service Order," an honor which was instituted in 
1886, and is indicated by the letters "D. S. O." after the name, 
viz: Major Henry Wise Unett Coates, D. S. O., son of Rev. 
Wm. Unett Coates, vicar of Hill Co., Gloucester; Captain Reginald 
Carlyon Coates, D. S. O., Royal Field Artillery, son of Rev 

(7) 



8 Introductory . 

George Alexander Augustus Coates of Earl's Croome, Worcester; 
Major Andrew Coates, D. S. O., youngest son of the late Thomas 
Coats. 

There are two suggestive derivations of the name Coats or 
Coates: 1. From the Anglo-Saxon cot, (sometimes cote) a hut 
or chamber, from which we have cottage, cottar, sheepcote, dove- 
cot. The word is sometimes spelt coat. Coat, a garment, is 
from the same root, which originally meant a covering. 2. From 
the Celtic coed or coid, a wood. 

There are two places in Scotland named Coats, besides Coat 
bridge and Coat-dyke (d}^ke is the Scotch for wall). 

England has three places named Coats, and two Coathams, 
{ham is the Anglo-Saxon for a dwelling, whence our own word 
home) . 

From the localities of these various places, the first deriva- 
tion is probably the correct one. Two or three cots (pronounced 
with a long o, as in coats), standing near one another, would 
come to be called "the Coats,' ' and the name would, as frequently 
was the case, be transferred to those who dwelt there. John of 
the Coats would become John of Coats, then, John Coats. 

Another claim for this origin of the name is, Cotes, or "Over 
the Coasts." In 1668 one, Thomas Coates, was a member of 
Whicksley Meeting, Yorkshire, England. 

There are traditions that the Coateses, who emigrated from 
Ireland to Pennsylvania were of Scotch extraction, and with 
other Scotch families were transplanted from Scotland to Ireland 
with Presbyterians and other reformers by Oliver Cromwell, 
after his wars when so many Roman Catholic families were dis- 
troyed. This would make a term Scotch-Irish Quakers, synony- 
mous with the accepted term "Scotch-Irish Presbyterian." How- 
ever this may be the most authentic authority we have been able 
to find, bears to the conclusion that the Coateses from Ireland 
were originally from England, and will likely have to remain so 
unless more positive proof to the contrary. 

The first person by name of Coates on American soil, with 
whom we have positive knowledge, was Thomas Coates, emigrant 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 9 

from Sproxton, Leicestershire, England, in 1682 or 83. Was born 
9, 26, 1659, son of Henr3 T and Elizabeth Coates, of old Leicester- 
shire and Derby families, and were members of the Episcopal 
Church. Thomas became a successful merchant in Philadelphia, 
and owned several lots at corner of 2nd and Market streets, where 
he resided. Two remaining great-great-granddaughters yet 
(1904) possess one of these lots at above corner, but reside on 
Arch Street. 

Thomas married Beulah Jaques, of Philadelphia, and became 
members of the Society of Friends, and were valued members of 
the society and citizens of the city. Henry T. Coates, publisher, 
is of this branch of the name. 

Some 3 T ears after Thomas came to Philadelphia, another im- 
portation of the name arrived from England: — two brothers, by 
name John and William, who were brickmakers and bought land 
in northern part of the city, then known as "Northern Liberties," 
where they established brickyards, from which business they be- 
came wealthy. Coates Street (now Fairmont Avenue) derived 
its name from this branch. 

In 1S42, one, Thomas Coates, with five sons and two daugh- 
ters, emigrated from Reeth, Yorkshire, England, to Dubuque, 
Iowa, his wife, Jane (Place) Coates, having died before her hus- 
band and children left England. On their journey the vessel in 
which they were, was wrecked in Lake Erie, about six miles out 
from Cleveland, Ohio, the whole cargo was lost. The Coateses 
lost all their possessions, including a valuable library, a part of 
which was family history which a last remaining son wrote, was 
a great loss to posterity. 

As early as 1661, the name appears in Ireland, when one 
"O. Coates went with Edward Cooke and the Chancellor to see 
about the release of Friends from prison.'' 

Thus we know of persons of this name and spelling in the 
Emerald Isle nearly two and a half centuries ago. May we not 
feel it an honor to be extractions from such a genial and warm- 
hearted ancestry of a country claiming to "have the same num- 
ber of square miles as the State of Indiana, also has more kind- 
ness to the acre than any country on earth. *' 



1 In trod iicto ry . 

The line of Coatesses in which we are directly interested, 
and have records to verify our statements, is that of Moses and 
•Susanna (Weldon) Coates, who emigrated from Carlow, Ireland, 
in 1717 to Pennsylvania, and whose descendants we have diligently 
sought for since the inception of Coates' Reunion held in Oxford 
Park, 9 mo. 6, 1900, where almost two hundred of the descend- 
ants of those common ancestors assembled for a day's pleasure 
and sociability. 

To assume I have found and compiled a complete record of 
the generations and members of our ancestors from Carlow, 
is beyond my claim, for no such work of an\- old family is 
■or can be absolutely complete and remain so for any definite 
length of time, for births, deaths, and changes in other ways are 
-constantly transpiring. Some lines are lost by the breaking of a 
thread and no further trace being obtainable to gather the scat- 
tered ends. Another too prevalent source of deficiency may be 
noticed, inasmuch as some to whom applications have been made 
for data have neglected to notice my asking, and now should not 
be too critical with dissenting words toward the compiler of the 
contents of the following pages, where omissions and errors occur. 

Among the man3^ who have kindly aided in this perplexing, 
yet always interesting research, I will mention with pleasure: 
Esther V. Mather and daughter, Irene Woodward, Philadelphia; 
Gilbert Cope, West Chester; E. D. Wileman, Cleveland, O. ; 
Kirk Brown, Baltimore, Md.; Eliza Walker, Port Kennedy, Pa.; 
Albert Cook Myers, Swarthmore, Pa.; Thomas Wynne, Phila- 
delphia; Chalkley Matlock, Philadelphia; "Annals of Pheonix- 
ville, Pa./' by Governor Charles Penn3 T packer; J. Beauley Beale, 
Dublin, Ireland; Eidie O. Priest, Phoenixville, Pa.; Rebecca E. 
Price, Lancaster, Pa.; Mary McCalve} T , Kansas City, Mo.; Eaura 
C.Reed, Kansas City, Mo.; Esther J. Fox, Ohio; Priscilla W. 
Streets, Philadelphia; Eavinia Shafer, Phoenixville, Pa. 

To the named and unnamed, whoever and wherever, who 
have in the least aided in bringing to the present degree of per- 
fection, the data of this volume, I extend my kindest appreciation 
and thanks. Truman Coates. 

Oxford, Pa., 1906. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 11 

Communication from Professor George B. Carr, D.D. Lincoln 

University, Pa, 

Coats is a well-known name in Scotland, and beyond it, 
through a family which has long been connected by residence, 
business, and generous deeds for the public good, with the manu- 
facturing town of Paisley, about seven miles from Glasgow. 

Published records of the famil)' begin with James Coats, of 
Paisley; b. 1 Oct., 1774; d. 19 Aug., 1857; m. 22 Nov., 1802, 
Catherine Mitchell (d. 11 Feb., 1857), and had issue(among others): 

Sir Peter Coats, (3d son) of Auchendrane, Ayrshire. He 
received the well-deserved honor of knighthood in 1869. 

Thomas Coats (4th son) of Ferguslie and Maxwellton, Ren- 
frewshire; b. 15 Oct., 1809; d. 18 Oct., 1883; m. 13 Oct., 1840, 
Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas Glen, of Thornhill, Ren- 
frewshire, and had issue (among others) : 

Sir Thomas Glen-Glen Coats Paisley, J. P., (in the United 
Kingdom, an unpaid local magistrate), and D. L. (Deputy Lieu- 
tenant of the County, appointed by the Government — the position 
being esteemed an honor), Hon. Col. of the 2d Volunteer Bat- 
talion, Princess Louise, Argyll and Sutherlanders; b. 19 Feb., 
1846; m. 20 April, 1876, Elise Agnes, daughter of Alexander 
Walker, Montreal, and has issue: 1. Thomas Coats Glen, B.A., 
Oxford; b. 5 May, 1878. 2. Alexander Harold Glen; b. 26 July, 
1883. 3. Marion Marjorie Winnifred Glen. Sir Thomas was 
created a Baronet in 1894. His crest is a stag's head, and an 
anchor, with the motto, "Be firm." 

The wealth of the family, from which they have given so 
largely to religious and benevolent objects, comes from the manu- 
facture of thread, the spools of "J & P. Coats," like those of the 
Clarks, also from Paisley, being in use over the world. 

G. B. C. 



PART I. 

MOSES AND SUSANNA COATES. 



At our Six weeks men's Meeting at Clonmel, 27th 12 mo. 1714. 

Moses Coats, son of Thomas Coats of Ballycater in the County 
of Caterloe, & Susannah Weldon. daughter of Samuell Weldon 
of Gullacasane appeared in this meeting & signified their inten- 
tions of marriage with each other they having done the like in 
the womens meeting & his father & her father & mother being 
called & queried o concerning their consenting to it signified that 
they were consenting so that nothing appearing to obstruct their 
prbceedings this meeting leaves them to make their second ap- 
pearance at next Province Meeting if they proceed. 



At the Province Men's Meeting- at Corke, 25 2 mo., i7ij. 

Moses Coats of the County of Catherlow and Susanna 
Wielding of the County of Tipperary having made known their 
intentions of marriage with each other to Men's Meeting of Clon- 
mell, and from thence being recommended to the Province Meet- 
ing have ye sent their said intentiohs to this, as also to Women's 
Meeting and it appearing that parents on both sides have given 
their consents, and that the Women's Meeting have taken care 
to enquire into the clearness of the sd Susanna, this meeting ap- 
points John Boles & Sollomon Wattson to write to some friends 
of ye County of Catherlow to enquire into the clearness of the 
sd Moses, and to order Publication of their intention to be made 
in both meetings they belong to, and thereof to certify ye next 
Province Meeting if ye said ptys then approve. 

(12) 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 13 

At our Six weeks men meeting at Killcomon Beg ye jo of 
2 mo., if 15. 
John Boles & Solomon Watson being appointed by the 
Province Meeting to write some friends in the County of Cataloe 
to Enquire into the clearness of Moses Coats on acct of marriage 
in them parts & to cause Publication to be made of his intended 
marriage with Susanah Weldou this meeting desires them to 
mind the same & return acct thereof to next Province meeting. 
Extracts from minute book of County Tipperary meeting of 
the Society of Friends. 

J. Ernest Grub, Carrickon Suir, 29x1 05. 



At the Province mens meeting? in Cork the 25 2 mo., ij is* 

(minute no 2) Moses Coats in prson and Susanna Weldon by 
Certificate under her hand seconded by the womens meeting of 
Cashell having signified ye continuation of their desires for ye 
accomplishing their intended marriage (laid before last meeting) 
and all things relating to this clearness being answered to ye 
satisfaction of this meeting. The said prtys are referred to 
Friends of the monthly or six weeks meetings of those prts to 
see ye orderly ascomplishmeut of their marriage in convenient 
time &c. , 

Extracted from said minutes at Cork, IS November, 1905. A 
true copy. 

The spelling above is as in the original. Kilcomou Beg is 
situate in County Tipperary, 8 or 10 miles south of Cashel. I 
believe the meeting-house and graveyard there (they have long 
since disappeared) passed into the hands of the Earl of Glengall 
and formed a part of his domain. An old story tells that he 
threw the Quaker bones into the Suir which flowed close by. A 
wise woman predicted he or his family would be thrown out of 
his estate by the Quakers or to that effect, the prophecy was ful- 
filled when Bxibert Malcomson (perhaps 100 years later or longer) 
a member of our Society purchased this domain, and Castle and 
mansion of the Earls of Glengall in the Lauded Estates Court 
(formerely incumbered Estates Court) and lived in the mansion 



14 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

where I believe his only child was born, i. e. the present Robert 
Malcomson of Melview Clonmel. The Glengall family had to 
sell to pay their debts. The title became extinct, so in every 
sense the prophecy was fulfilled. 

J. Ernest Grubb, 

Carrickon Suir, Ireland. 



From our mens Meeting held at Cartel ye Sth day of ye 3d Mo. 

anno 1717. 

These may Certifie all whom it may Concern that our friend 
Moses Coats having a resolution to remove from this Country to 
America desires some few lines from us to friends we therefore 
do Certifie you where his lot may fall that he has been brought 
up from a child among us and behaved him self Orderly as also 
kept constantly to our Meetings both Monthly and Weekly as 
they came he also took his wife among friends in the Province 
of Munster his Proceedings therein we refer you to his Marriage 
Certificate he also for some years has been admitted into our 
Mens Meeting as a member thereof. 
Signed in behalf and by order 
of our Mens Meeting by 

James Lackey, 
Thos. Patcke, * 
Samueu. Wattson. 



At Haver ford {now Radnor) Monthly Meeting, 10 mo. i, 1717. 

"Moses Coates produced a Certificate from friends at Carloe 
in Ireland, Signifying his behaviour There among them and 
their unity with him which was read In this meeting and Ordered 
To be recorded. "f 

*Thomas Parke brought a certificate from Carloe in 1724, of which 
Samuel Watson was a signer. — G. Cope. 

tTaken from Book ist., of Records of Merion, Radnor, Haverford Mo 
Mtg,, for Recording Certificates p. 195. John M. Geogre, Recorder. On 
record at 15th and Races Sts., Phila, Pa., Friends Record vault. 




Exterior and Interior Friends Meeting House, Carlow, Ireland. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. IS 

Office of the Society of Friends, 6 Eustace Street, Dublin, 
2, 6 mo. ipoj. 

Dear Friend, Truman Coates, M.D. 

(Memeo. from Carlow M. M. Proceedings). 

1 mo., 1693, Thomas Coats name occurs in a list of Sub- 
scribers — his subscription was £3. 

In 1699, his name again occurs for a much smaller sum — 
toward a New Meeting House in Carlow. 

In the book of Marriage Certificates, from 1660 to 176S, 
there is a Marriage Certificate of Mary Coats (married to Joseph 
Thompson— both of Carlow) dated 19, 2 mo. 1702, the first 
signature as witness to it is Thomas Coats, but no particulars 
are given of her parents as is now the case. 

In the Monthly Meeting Proceeding Book there is an entry 
of the 22, 12, 1712, respecting Thomas Coats and his son Moses 
Coats, disowning them from Membership on account of conduct 
"bringing reproach on the Truth." 

It appears that the present Friends Meeting House in Carlow 
was built about 1718. The membership on 12 mo. 31, 1904, was 
twenty- two. There were at the above date twelve Monthly 
Meetings of Friends with a recorded membership of t wen ty- five 
hundred aud eleven, in Ireland. 

J. Beauley Beai,e. 



NOTES OF THE EMIGRANTS. 

Moses Coates was born in Ireland of an English family, who 
crossed the Channel to escape religions persecution. The Coates 
family seemed to have possessed, in a marked degree; those 
qualifications and steadfastness that distinguished the Society of 
Friends.* 

Moses Coates took his wife Susanna Weldon, from among 
Friends, in the Province of Munster, and were married in Cashel 

*Genealogy of Families of Chester and Delaware Counties, Pa. (1904). 



16 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Friends Meeting, County Tipperary, Province of Munster, Ire- 
land, on third month, 1, 1715.* 

Moses Coates, with his wife, Susanna, emigrated from Car- 
low, Ireland, in 1717 and settled in Providence Township, Mont- 
gomery Co., Pa.f 

At Haverford Monthly Meeting, held at Merion Meeting 
House, 6 mo. 12, 1725, Moses Coates requested a Certificate to 
Guynedd Monthly Meeting. 

Moses Coateses Certificate to Guynedd Monthly Meeting 
was produced at this Meeting, held at Haverford Meeting House 
5 mo. 26, 1726, and ordered to be signed. J 

From Tax Receipts we learn that Moses Coates was in 
Charlestown Township (now Schuylkill) as earl y as 1729, and in 
1729 or 1730 he bought 150 acres of land on north side of French 
Creek, at its junction with Schuylkill river. || Pie and James Starr, 
a miller from New Castile, Del., but an emigrant from Carlow, 
Ireland, became the first settlers at the sight of Phoenixville. 

Moses Coates and his wife emigrated from Carlow, Ireland, 
and settled within verge of Haverford M. M. but Providence 
Preparative Meeting, in Montgomery Co., Pa. They were both 
Friends. His wife was from Province of Munster, Ireland. § 



EXPLANATIONS. 

The generations will be lettered, while the children of each 
will be numbered, thus: Generation "A" will be Moses and 
Susanna Coates, while Generation "B" will compose the children 
of "A" and in numbers, will be as follows: B 1. B. 2. &c, to 
B 8. The children of "B" will be C 1. C 2. &c. 

The names of children in one generation and numbered— if 

*From letter from J. Beauley Bcale, Dublin, Ireland: '-There has been 
no Friends Meeting held in Cashell for more than a century, the sight of 
house is forgotten (1902). 

tOld records. 

tPennypacker's "Annals of Phoenix^ ille." 

|| History of Delaware Co., Pa. 

§Gilbert Cope. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 17 

married — are carried to next generation as parents, and lettered. 

For the sake of economy in space, this rule is not strictly 
observed in the latter generations when the families are small. 

The names in brackets, after the name of the head of the 
family will be seen to be the parent in each succeeding genera- 
tion, reaching in each instance to Moses, the emigrant. 

Dates are given in numbers, and in order of month, day and 
year. 

Abbreviations: b. born; d. died; m. married; int., interred; 
dan. daughter; m. mtg. monthly meeting; unm. unmarried; 
F. B. G. Friends Burying Ground. 

Generation A is composed of Moses and Susanna Coates. 
Moses Coates died at his home on his farm on present sight of 
Phoenixville, 4 mo., 1761, where now stands Phoenix Iron 
Works. Susanna, his wife, died 11 mo. 30, 1772, and both 
interred in Pikeland Friends burying ground. 

Generation B comprises the children of A, Moses and Susan- 
na, as follows: 

B. i. Thomas Coates, b. 12, 22, 1716, in Ireland. Int. in East Cain 
F. B. G., 1797. 

2. Samuel Coates, b. 6, 5, 181S. Int., in East Cain F. B. G. 

3. Moses Coates, Jr. b. 11, 25, 1719. Int. (claimed) in Pikeland 

F. B. G. 

4. Elizabeth Coates, b. 1, 13, 1722; d. 3,16, 1770. 

5. William Coates. No dates, died young and single. 

6. Jonathan Coates, b. n, 17, 172S, in Providence, Montgomery 

Co., Pa.; d. 5, 27, 1S07. 

7. Aaron Coates, b. — , — , 1731. 

S. Benjamin Coates, b. — , — , 1733; d. — , — , 1S01. Int. at Pikeland 
F. B. G„ Chester Co., Pa. 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 

In March, 1731, Moses Coates purchased ISO acres of land 
on the northern side of French Creek at its junction with Schuyl- 
kill river, in Cliarlestown Township, (now Schuylkill) and 
erected a dwelling, about which he planted, for ornament, the 
wild honey locust trees, which until recently before 1S70, were 



18 GeneaoJogy of the Coates Family, 

still growing upon the sight. At this time the only inhabitants 
upon the Manavon Tract, were himself, Francis Buckwalter and 
"Sky," (the latter was an appelation by which a friendly Indian 
was known, who remained, with his family, among the settlers 
after the others of his tribe had retired). 

Wolves were so numerous that the sheepfold, for security, 
was placed against the house, and for man} r years afterward, in 
winter mornings, the snow would be found beaten down b} T the 
struggles of these animals in their effort to gain entrance; when 
they became too daring, a gun would be discharged from a win- 
dow into the pack, which would disperse them temporarily. Pre- 
vious to his purchase in Monavon; Moses Coates had lived for 
about a year on the opposite side of the Schuylkill, where stands 
the present village of Mont Clare, a locality he selected because 
the Indians were there less numerous. 

At night he slept with a loaded gun at his side, and a ser- 
vant la} T at the door of his cave with a pitchfork. Upon longer 
acquaintance however he found the natives disposed to be 
friendly, and his fear of their hostility being dissipated, he 
changed his place of residence. While living on the opposite 
side of the river from their land, the Coates' sons were wont to 
diesobe, and by holding their clothing up with one hand, would 
swim across the river to and from their work, but, on one unfor- 
tunate trip, one of their number dropped his pantaloons into the 
water, and from this mishap was compelled to lie abed while his 
mother dried this article of apparel. 

During the winter of 1730 and 31, Moses Coates caught, up- 
on the island in the river, opposite Phoenixville, twenty-four 
beavers. Shortly after his arrival in this district, he induced his 
friend, James Starr, a miller, from New Castile, Del., originally 
from Carlow, Ireland, to follow him. thither. In December, 1731, 
with his two sons, James and Moses, he purchased 350 acres of land 
for 230 pounds, the land included between French Creek and a 
line running from French Creek bridge along "Nut's road" to 
the "Corner Stores," and from there by way of the "White 
Horse" to the Schuylkill. 

Many of the Indians (who were numerous along French 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 19 

Creek when Moses Coates made his home there in 1730) died 
and were buried at Green Hill and in the hill at Black Rock, but 
there is nothing, long since, at either place to indicate the exact 
spot. Moses Coates "blazed" paths through the wilderness about 
his home, cutting chips off the sides of trees, so that his children 
should not be lost. It was the custom among the early settlers 
to turn all of their domestic animals, except their sheep, out into 
the woods, and let them find their own living; one cow in the 
herd having a bell fastened about her neck, so that in the even- 
ings its tinkling would indicate where they could be found. On 
one occasion the girl of John Buckwalter, was sent for the cows, 
and after a long search, heard the sound of the bell at a great 
distance from her home. By the time she had collected the 
animals together it was dark, and becoming bewildered in the 
woods she lost her way. 

The wolves began howling about her, the cows huddled to- 
gether for mutual protection and the terrified girl crept into the 
midst of the herd and lay all night safely beside the "bell cow." 

Amongst the earliest settlers in this locality were: Thomas 
Davis, in 1723, David Humphery, in 1725, Llewellyn Davis, in 
1728, Aaron Coates, David Davis, called "Sawyer," and an old 
man named Jacob Varle} 7 . 

An early road entered the township at French Creek, bridge, 
and passed a southeasterly course until it reached the trail. It 
remained the only thoroughfare in that direction until Moses 
Coates, having purchased land, through which it passed, objected 
when a jury, in 1735, opened a road on aline between the proper- 
ties of Coates and Starr. From the active participation of Samuel 
Nutt in obtaining and locating this road, it received and has ever 
since borne his name. 

At the time of the French Creek Indian War, three copies 
of the "Pennsylvania Gazette," a news paper published by Hall 
Franklin, came to Charlestown Township. Moses Coates 
was a subscriber to one of them, and it was customary for the 
neighbors to gather at his home on the Sabbath, or at times of 
leisure, to read from its columns the reports from the frontier, 
and other items of interest. 



20 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

At the time of the Revolutionary War, Phoenixville had not 
yet commenced its existence. In a list of heads of families — 64 
mentioned — the names of Moses Coates, Jr., on the West Chester 
Road, South of Nutt's road; Benjamin Coates, Benjamin Long- 
streth, Edward Lane, Thomas Robinson, were amongst the 
above number mentioned families. There were at that time a 
few slaves in the neighborhood, but no free negroes. Amongst 
the slaves, one "Pet," owned by Benjamin Longstreth is men- 
tioned. 

The sons of Moses Coates, said that when they had grown 
to manhood, Pikeland w T as still an unbroken wilderness. Their 
nearest neighbors, after crossing the bounds of Manovan, were a 
family by name of Rogers, who lived in a cave on French Creek, 
seven miles distant. The inhabitants on the Manovan Tract at 
this time, besides themselves, were John Buckwalter, Moses Starr, 
"Sky" (an old Indian) and Roland Richards, who had rented 
the mill erected by James Starr. 

Soon after 1729 Morton and Henry Coates bought from 
Reeves & Whitaker, the "Chester County Iron Works," con- 
sisting of Mill and Nail Factory, on the Schuylkill, and north of 
French Creek, who continued the manufacture of nails until 1743, 
when they failed. The village of Phoenixville, had acquired the 
name of "Phoenix" from the name of a bird, suggested by a Mr. 
Wernwag, a Quaker; later the citizens added "ville" to the 
original name. 



Phoenixville, Pa., Oct. 12, 1904. 
Dkar Friend: 

I enclose a pamphlet given me by the Editor (Mr. 
Roberts), of "theMessenger"giving an account of the "Cave," no 
doubt the very one in which the Coateses dwelt in early times, 
for it is in the very place Mother told me it was, and on the spot 
on which now (1904) stands the P. R. R. Depot in Monte Clare, 
opposite Phoenixville. 

Later Moses Coates bought 500 acres land south of Phoenix- 
ville, supposed to be a portion of the land on which Hannah 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 21 

Longstreth and John Coates lived after their marriage. It was 
afterward the home of Moses Robinson. He was the son of 
Sarah Coates and Thomas Robinson. 

After Hannah (Longstreth) Coates became a widow she 
moved to a home that was her portion of her father's estate. At 
her home she planted the thorny locust. Her son, Aquilla, 
moved to Ohio. She and her son-in-law, Samuel Haycock, went 
to visit him, and she brought the beans home and planted them 
in her yard. I have a large tree in my yard now that is an off- 
shoot of these trees. 

I am, sincerely thy friend, 

Lavbnia W. Shafkr. 



Phoenixville, Pa. 

The first mention of a certain message of tract of land, was 
that one thousand acres was to be surveyed within the Province 
of Pennsylvania on the Schuylkill, in Charlestown Township, 
Chester County, to David Lloyd. The said one thousand acres 
was set apart to Lloyd by the Commissioners of property, April 
15, 1711. 

John Henry Sprogell deeded to David Lloyd one thousand 
acres Jan. 20, 1708. Will of David Lloyd, March 29th, 1724, 
devised his estate to his wife, Grace Lloyd. 

May 16th, 1754, sold 600 acres to Moses Coates, a part of 
the 1,000 acre tract. 

Oct. 30th, 1754, Moses Coates and wife conveyed 350 acres, 
part of the above 600 acres, to Moses Coates, Jr. 

May 10th, 1790, Moses Coates, Jr., conveyed 200 acres, part 
of the 350 acres, to John Hutchinson Coates. 

Death of J. H. Coates, Intestate. Petition of John Long- 
streth & Moses Robinson, adms., of J. H. Coates, Orphan's 
Court, Chester Co., ordered sale for payment of debts, &c. 

John Longstreth & Moses Robinson, Administrators of J. H. 
Coates, Jan. 27th, 1806, conveyed 113 acres of the above 350 
acres to Thomas Robinson, subject to the dower of Hannah 
Coates. Thomas Robinson and wife, to Moses Robinson, 72 
acres, Aug. 13 ; 1816. 



22 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

The will of Moses Robinson gave power to his executor, 
Moses Walker, to sell and convey his real estate. 

Moses Walker to Henry Dyer, April 4th, 1S57, 72 acres. 
Death of Henry Dyer. 

Mary C. Dyer, Jacob March and wife, Elizabeth C. Dyer (to 
William P. Dyer, Oct. 14th, 1892, 72 acres. Wm. P. Dyer to 
Hettie Y. Hallowell, April 22nd, 1S96, the 72 acres. 

Hettie Y. Haixoweix, 
Phoenixville, Pa., 6 mo., 1905. 

COPY OF OLD DEED. 

THIS INDENTURE made the Fourteenth Day of the 
Eleventh Month called January in the Year of Our Lord One 
Thousand Seven Hundred Forty three BETWEEN Moses 
Coates of Charles Town in the County of Chester in the Province 
of Pennsylvania Yeoman and Susanna his wife of the one part 
WHEREAS WILLIAM PENN Esr first Proprietory of the 
Said Province by Indenture of Release Second Day of August 
Anno Dom One Thousand Six Hundred Eighty one for the con- 
sideration therein mentioned Granted the proportion or Quantity 
of Five Hundred acres of Land to be Located in said Province 
Unto Anthony Eston fee AND the Said Anthony Eston Deceas- 
ing left two only Children Authony and Jane AND the Said 
Anthony Eston the same by his Deed of the Twelfth Day of No- 
vember Anno Dom 1702 Granted the full proportion of Four 
Hundred acres the remainder of the Said Five Hundred acres 
then unlocated unto Edward Smout Intermarrying with the Said 
Jane the Daughter of the Said Anthony Eston the latter obtained 
a Proprietory warrant for the Location of Three Hundred & 
Ninety two acres in Right of and as the full Remainder of the 
Said Five Hundred acres untaken up and one other Proprietory 
Warrant for one Hundred acres more contiguous thereto AND 
the Proprietory by patent of his Commissioners of the Eleventh 
day of October Anno Dom 1703. Confirmed the Said Three Hun- 
dred & Ninety two acres and one Hundred acres in one Entire 
Tract by the Buts aud Bounds herein after mentioned unto the 









Fir, 



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,iSClllicj|ii^»trMl ,H.S-Al»l"|nlVl| UU\%\ JUMH Wi^fi* fvH*(l J>WHV>V ^ 



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£•; 



'*• 




Corner of Deed showing Signatures of Moses and Susanna Coates 
for 192 acres of land bought by Moses, 1728, in Cain Twp., Chester Co., P; 




Pifceland Friends Burial Ground, 
wherein are interred Moses (1761 } and Susanna Coatpsf 1772), and others < 



their family 



Gencaology oj the Coatcs Family. 23 

Said Edward Smout in fee paying the Yearl} 7 quit rent of one 
English Silver Shilling for each Hundred acres & so proportion- 
ate the patent on Record Book A Vol. 2, page 620. AND the 
Said Edward Smout Deceasing Intestate left Said Jane his widow 
& Several Children by her Viz: Edward, Sylvanus and John and 
the Said Edward Smout the Son and Heir at Law of the Said 
Edward Smout Deceased by Indenture of the Fourth Day of 
March Anno Dom 1712 Granted & Conveyed Four Hundred 
Ninety two acres of Land aforesaid unto Anthony Morris Sen, in 
fee the Indenture on Record at Philadelphia Book F Vol 8 page 
297 and the Said Sylvanus Smout Released unto the Said Anthony 
Morris Sen, the Said Tract of Land and premises and all his Ef- 
fects and Titles to the Same as b} T Deed on Record at Philadel- 
phia Book F. Vol 5 page 147 may appear And the Said Jane the 
widow of the Said Edward Smout the latter is Departed this 
Life Intestate and the Said John Smout also Died without Issue 
and Intestate, By force and Devising of which half Devised In- 
denture and Release and of the matters and things herein before 
Devised or by some other good Conveyance or assurance in the 
Law Duly had and Executed by the Said Anthony Morris Sen 
became in his Life time Lawfully seized in his Demises as of fee 
of and in the Said Four Hundred & Ninety two acres of Land 
with the appurtances AND he the Said Anthony Morris being 
so thereof Seized made his last will and Testament in writing 
bearing Date the tenth Day of July Anno Dom 1725 and therein 
Nominated his son Anthony Morris and Israel Pemberton to be 
his Executors and did thereby Impower and Authorise his Ex- 
ecutors at any time or times after his son Lute should attain the 
age of Twenty one Years to sell and Convey (Et. Al.) all or any 
of his Unimproved Lands in the Counties of Philadelphia or 
Chester to any person or persons their Heirs or Assigns forever 
for such Consideration as his Said Executors Should think fit 
which the Four Hundred & ninety two acres of Land aforesaid 
the Same being Unimproved and in the County of Chester as by 
the Same Testament remaining in the Registers Central Office at 
Philadelphia Relation being thereunto had may Appear and soon 
after he the Said Anthony Morris the father Died so seized of 



24 Gcncaology of the Coaics Family. 

the premise in his Estate aforesaid and the Said Testators son 
Lute being arrived to his full age of one and Twenty Years they 
the Said Executors Israel Pemberton and Anthony Morris by 
their Indenture of Release Duly bearing Date the fourteenth Day 
of December Anno Dom 1728 for the consideration herein men- 
tioned Did Grant and Convey the Said Four Hundred & ninety 
two acres of Land and Premises unto the Said Moses Coates in 
fee being Butted and Bounded as follows, viz: Beginning at a 
white Oak at a corner of Abiah Taylor's Land and Extending by 
this same South Three Hundred and Twenty perches to a Chest- 
nut tree thence west by vacant Land Two Hundred and Six 
perches to a third Chestnut Tree thence by Margaret Shaffers 
Land East Two Hundred forty six perches to the place of Be- 
ginning NOW THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH that 
Moses Coates and Susanna his wife as well for and in Considera- 
tion of the Natural Love and effection which they bear unto their 
Said Son Samuel Coates as also for his better Livelihood and pre- 
ferements on this world HAVE given Granted Aleined Enfoffed 
Confirmed and by these presence do fully freely and Absolutely 
Give Grant Aleiii Anfoff and confirm unto their Son Samuel 
Coates his Heirs and Assign the one or full equal half part of 
the Said described Four Hundred & Ninety-two acres of Land 
BEGINNING at a Chestnut tree being a corner of Thomas 
Coates Land thence by the same Land South One Hundred and 
Sixty perches to a White Oak thence south ten perches to a 
Maple tree thence South by the same Land One Hundred and 
sixty perches to a post thence west by vacant Land one Hundred 
Eighteen perches to a Chestnut tree thence South by Land of 
the late John Brogan Three Hundred and Twenty perches to a 
Chestnut Tree thence East by Edward Thompsons Land one 
hundred and Twenty Eight perches to the place of Beginning 
Containing Two Hundred forty six acres to be the same more or 
less Together also with all and Singular the fields fences Build- 
ings Orchards Meadows Woods and Ways Water Courses Rights 
Liberties Privileges Improvements Heriditaments and Appur- 
tances whatsoever thereunto belonging or in any way appertain- 
ing and Reversions and Remainders Rents issues and profits 




Haverford (now Radnor) Friends Meeting House, Del., Co,, Pa. 
Here was placed certificates of Moses and Susanna Ooates, Oct, 12,1717, from rarlow 
M. M., Ireland. This is an historical spot, as Macaw's men encamped near t lie 
spot and used the houseasa hospital during the Revolutionary War. 









1 Jt; "^. ' * 

i . r 


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CMi i ill"' 1 ' r •'• 
















l*Iii^ 




*"wpWt51 


JKg^lyg 




***« 


-®|kMSS^S'" 


— - 



East Cain Meeting House. 
Here I he name ot'Coates has been on the membership roll K>4 yimrs.^ 




Geneaology of the Coates Family. 25 

thereof and True Copies of all Deeds Indentures and writings 
concerning the same TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the Said 
Two Hundred Forty Six acres of Land be it more or less Her- 
iditaments and promises hereby Granted and Conveyed or men- 
tioned to be Granted and conveyed with their appurtances unto 
the Said Samuel Coates and his Land to the only proper life and 
behoof of his the Said Samuel Coates his Heirs and Assigns for- 
ever UNDER the yearly quit rent hereinafter arising for the 
fee hereof AND the Said Moses Coates for himself his Said Ex- 
ecutors Administrators for the Said Susanna his wife Doth Cov- 
enant and Grant to and with the Said Samuel Coates his Heirs 
and Assigns by these presence that he the Said Samuel Coates 
his Heirs and Assigns shall and Lawfully ma} T from henceforth 
forever Peaceably and Quiet 1} T have sole use occupy possess and 
enjoy the Said Two Hundred Forty Six acres of Land be it more 
or less Heriditaments and promises hereby Granted or mentioned 
to be Granted and Conveyed with their appurtenances freely and 
duely discharged of and from all former and other Grants Bar- 
gains, Sales Gifts Indentured devised Estates Rents Judgements 
Executions Transfers and from all other Titles Changes and Eu- 
comberances whatsoever had made might done or Suffered or to 
be had made encumbered Done or Suffered by the Said Moses 
Coates his Heirs Executors or Administrators or any other per- 
son or persons Lawfully claiming or to Claim by from or under 
him them or any of them IN WITNESS whereof the Said 
parties to these presence have Interchangeably Set their hands 
and Seals hereunto Dated the Day and Year first above written. 
Sealed and Delivered in presence of us 

Moses Coates Junr. Moses Coates 

James Parker Susanna Coates 



FROM HAVERFORD MONTHLY MEETING RECORD. 

6 mo. 12, 1725: "Arthur Jones & John Morgan are ap- 
pointed to make inquiry concerning Moses Coats conversation. 
He Requested a Certificate to Guynedd Mo Meeting.' ' 



26 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

7 mo. 5, 1725: "Moses Coats Certificate being brought to 
this meeting was read and ordered to be signed." 

8 mo. 14, 1725: "Arthur Jones & John Morgan are desired 
to make Enquiry whether the reports that are spread Concerning 
Moses Coats be true & to make report to next meeting, because 
Last meeting has given a Certificate of his Conversation Directed 
to Guynedd Mo. Meeting. 

9mo. 11, 1725: "pursuant to Last meetings order its agreed 
that it be signified to Guynedd Meeting ye Moses Coats Conduct 
Since he removed over Schuylkill is not included in his Certificate 
but is left to their Inspection sent to them and Signed by Robert 
Jones." 

lOmo. 9, 1725: "David Llewellin & Evan Jones are desired 
to speak wth Moses Coats And Endeavor to put him in a way to 
Remove the Jealousy that the meeting has concerning him & to 
Report to next Meeting." 

llmo. 13, 1725: "The friends appointed to speak with Moses 
Coats has brought the Certificate that this meeting Granted him 
formerely to this meeting & Reports that he proposes Ere long 
to Come & give this meeting Satisfaction." 

lmo. 10, 1726: "Evan Jones & Stephen Bevam are desired 
to speak wth Moses Coats and endeavor to prevail wth him to 
give satisfaction to this meeting." 

2mo.l5, 1726: "Moses Coates being present at this Meeting 
is Desired further to Consider his Resolutions to Comply wth this 
Meetings Advice." 

Testimony of disownment ordered to be prepared for Moses 
Coates because of his unwillingness to settle a claim against him. 

At Haverford Monthly Meeting, 3mo. 12, 1726: 

" Moses Coats brought a paper to this Meeting Acknowl- 
edging that he is heartily Sorry that He had given any occasion 
in his Conduct to bring reproach on the truth wth this Meeting 
Receives." 

4mo. 9, 1726: "Lewis Walker & Stephen Bevan are appointed 
to prepare a certificate for Moses Coats. ' ' 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 27 

5mo. 14, 1626: "Moses Coats Certificate was read and or- 
dered to be signed. ' ' 

Moses Coates was a witness to the marriage of Joseph Thomas 
and Jemima Davis, at Lewis Walker's home in Tredyffrin, 8mo 
29, 1718. 

Also witness to marriage of Samuel Evans and Hanna Walk- 
er at the same place, 4mo. 10, 1724. 



At Gwynedd Monthly Meeting 28th of 10th Mo. ij6o. 

Moses Coates gave in a paper wherein he says he has paid 
Peter Ashton the debt for the refusal whereof together with his 
unbecoming Conduct he was testified agaiust by our Meeting, and 
produced his receipt thereof. The paper is as follows, viz: 



To Gwynedd Monthly Meeting. 

Whereas I have been Testified against some years passed for 
refusing to pay a certain sum of Money to Peter Ashton, and 
since then being visited with Sorrow and disquiet of Mind on that 
account I have discharged all dues and demands to the said and 
I do hereby condemn the spirit which led me at that time to give 
so much trouble to Friends; being now very sensible that the fel- 
lowship and Society of Friends is helpful in old age as well as in 
youth, and hereby desiring to be again received into the Commu- 
nity hoping that my footsteps shall hereafter be guided in the 
paths that lead to peace. 

(No signature to record.) 

Dated the 28th of the 10th mo., 1760. 



A FULL COPY OF THE WILL OF MOSES COATES, SR. 

Whereas, I; Moses Coates of Charlestown township, Chester 
County and Province of Pennsylvania, being weak in Body, 
but of Sound and Perfect Memory, do this fourteenth day 
of April, Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and sixty- 



28 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

one, make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby 
Disannuling and Revoking all former wills by me made whatso- 
ever. Item. I give and bequeath to my Loving wife the Sum of 
Six Pounds a year During her natural life four pounds thereof 
to be paid her out of the interest money which is in the hands of 
Jonathan & Benjamin Coates & the other fourty Shillings to be 
paid her by Benjamin Coates yearly out of his Plantation together 
with all the household goods that she brought with her & the 
new white Rug and the tea-table & small Brindled Cow. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my Grand Daughters Susanna 
and Priscilla Mendenhall the Sum of fourty Pounds each also 
the sum of Twenty Pounds to their brother Moses Mendenhall 
but if any or either of them should die before they come to age 
to receive the sd money that then their part shall be at ye Dis- 
posal of their mother and the sd money is to be left on interest 
until ye Death of ray wife in order to pay her the aforesd four 
pounds a year. Item. I give & bequeath unto Elizth Coates 
Daughter of Moses Coates, Jur. the sum of Twenty Pounds to 
be paid at ye death of my wife. Item. I give & bequeath unto 
my Daughter Elizth my large Bible. Item, I give & bequeath 
unto my son Moses my Red Cow, Item. I give and bequeath 
all my other household goods to son Benjamin, I also give and 
bequeth unto my sou Benjamin the Plantation I live on accord- 
ing to all the butts and bounds therof with all the improvements 
& appurtances thereon belonging to him and his heirs forever in 
fee to hold the same as also that piece or parcell of land lying 
between the great road & ye Mill land which I bought of David 
Davis containing twenty-one acres & a half to him and his heirs 
forever. Item. I give & bequeath unto my son Aaron Coates 
all that piece of land Surveyed to him bounded by the land of 
Moses & Jonathan Coates & John Varley Containing Thirty-five 
acres to him and his heirs forever in fee. Item. I give & be- 
queath my wearing apparel to my son Thomas and I 
do hereb> Constitute and appoint my Son Moses Coates my Sole 
Executor to this my last will and Testament to see that all things 



Gcneaology of the Coates Family. 29 

be performed & accomplished according to the true intent and 
meaning thereof. 

Moses Coates (Sl. ) 
Signd and Seald Published and acknowledged to be his last 
will and Testament in the Presence of 

Joseph Griffith 
Geo. Sholfield. 
Jonath Coates affd 1761 April 25th Executor affid. 

Philada 25 April Then personally appeared George Sholfield 
and Jonathan Coates two of the witnesses of the foregoing will 
and the said George Scholfield on oath and the sd Jonathan Coates 
on his solumu affirmation according to law did declare they saw and 
heard Moses Coates the Testator therein named Sign Seal publish 
and declare the same will for and as his last will and Testament 
and that the doing thereof he was of sound mind memory and 
understanding to the best of their knowledge. 

Wm. Chemsted, Regstr. 

A true and last Appraisement of the goods and Chatties of 
Moses Coates of Charlestown Chester County and Province of 
Pennsylvania Deceased appraised by us the subscribers this 21st 
da> 7 of April Anno Dom 1761. 

To his Riding Mare ,£12.10.0 

To a Saddle and Bridle 1.00.0 

Wearing Apparell 10.00.0 

Clock 8.00.0 

Oval Table 1.05.0 

Desk 5.00.0 

Clothes Press 4.00.0 

Couch 1.05.0 

Books 3.00.0 

Bed & furnature 6.00.0 

Chest 10.0 

Kitchen Furnature 10.00.0 

Rusg & Curtains 3.00.0 

Bed and Furnature 10.00.0 



30 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 



Chest 






18.0 


Tea Table 






15.0 


Chairs 






15.0 


8 yds cloth 

Tea Implements 

Warming Pan 

Tongs hand Irons & Sundries 




2.16.0 

1.00.0 

15.0 

15.0 


Pot Racks & Kettle 






7.6 


Arm Chair 






5.0 


Two Cows 






8.00.0 


Two Hiefers 






4.00.0 


10 Sheep 
Hogg 
Lumber 
Cash 






3.10.0 

10.0 

1.00.0 

129.00.0 




^239.15.6 




Appraised by 


Jno 


Vauntin. 






Laszidkr Wagner 



MOSES COATES. 

The Lord said unto Moses, 

The Quaker records say; 

From Ireland of the English, 

Now get thee forth this day. 

There is a western valley, 

And a river flowing there, 

Where thou shalt lead thy household 

And build thy alter fair. 

And thou shalt be a people; 

Led by the Light Divine, 

And east and west, and north and south, 

The pastures shall be thine. 

So Moses left his kindred, 
With Abram's trust of yore; 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 31 

And journeyed o'er the waters, 

To the far Western shore. 

With faith that knew no doubting, 

He saw as sure the way 

As Israel saw the pillared fire, 

And pillar of cloud by day. 

And there the seed of Moses, 
Fast throve and multiplied, 
Glad dwellers of the happy vales 
Of growing Phoenix's side. 
A people, just, God-fearing; 
True sons of truthful Penn, 
Who prove they love the Father, 
By love of fellowmen. 

Oh ! Abram's faith and Moses, 
To us it may be given, 
Many things are hard to solve 
This side the gates of Heaven. 
And may such lead us onward 
To brighter lands unseen; 
More perfect than sweet Canaan, 
Or Chester's vales of green. 



PART TWO. 



Thomas Coates, First child of Moses and Susanna Coates. 

B 1. Thomas Coates, (Moses) M:— Sarah, dau. of Henry 
and Sarah Miller, of Providence, now Delaware Co., Pa., 3, 21, 
1741. Their children:— 

C. i. Henry, b. 5. 14, 1742. Was a botanist d. UMN. int. East Cain 
F. B. G. 

2. Susanna, b. 3, 12, 1744. 

3. Jonathan, b. 4, 24, 1747. 

4. Samuel, b. g, 13, 1749. 

5. Elizabeth. No dates. Died at age of 16 years and 20 days of 

dysentery. 
Samuel and wife were living 11, 29, 1S1S from date of old letter 
from their son Thomas in Illinois. 

From Gwyuedd M. Mtg. records: — 

"An application, made on behalf of Thomas Coates for two 
certificates, one to proceed in marriage and another to settle him 
wth verge of Cain Monthly Meeting, 31st., of 1st mo., 1741. 

The certificates directed to be drawn for Thomas Coates were 
read and ordered it to be signed. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. records. 

6, 20, 1741, Thomas Coates produced a Certificate from North 
Wales (Gwynedd). Sarah Coates, wife of Thomas Coates, Cer- 
tificate from Chester. 

At a M. Mtg. held at Bradford 18th day of llmo. 1848 : 
Thomas Coates and Wm. Woodward were appointed to attend 
the next quarterly meeting. 

Thomas Coates, in his will, made 12mo.l6, 1792, and proven 
11, 1, 1797, bequeathed: "To son Jonathan 5 shillings. To son- 
in-law, Joseph Gladden — husband of daughter Susanna, 60 
pounds. To son Samuel, the Plantation of 246 acres of land, on 




Kesidence (leti half) Thomas and Sarah Coates, J74J-97. 
Situated near Cain Station, Chester Co., Pa. Left bv will to their son 
Samuel, and where he resided nil his lite. Owned (1!>05) by J. 
Andrew Seltzer. 




Residence of Samuel and Margaret Chernngton Coates. 
In Cain Townsmp, Chester Co., Pa., near Cain Station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
From painting in water colors, by their daughter, Sarah, in I Sol, in her 17th year. The 
carriage was that of Margaret, starting 10 East Cain Meeting on a 5th dav. On the 
white horse was "Bohby" Miller a friend of the family. The "Pittsburg" wagon, to 
the right, was a very common sitdit on this turnpike in days of yore. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 33 

which I live, he to provide for son Henry, who was deprived of 
his right reason," 

This farm is situated in Cain Township, Chester Co., Pa., 
near and east of Cain Station on P. C. R. R., the half part, on 
which stands the original residence of Thomas Coates, is now 
(1904) owned and occupied by J. Andrew Seltzer and family, the 
remainder of the original Thomas Coates farm is owned by Am- 
brose Fulton, on which stands the residence of Samuel Coates, 
the grand-son of Thomas, and son of Samuel Coates, who mar- 
ried Abigail Thatcher, by their deed, dated 4mo.2, A. D. 1824. 
sold and conv^ed to Samuel Torbet, one half of this tract of land 
(123 acres). 

In 1865, Samuel Torbet sold this farm to ex-President James 
Buchanan. His executors sold it William McCanna, and in 1875 
McCanna sold it to J. Andrew Saltzer, who in summer of 1904 
occupied the original Thomas Coates residence, as a part of his 
dwelling. 

The other half of the original Thomas Coates farm was 
deeded by Samuel, (son of Thomas) to his son Samuel who mar- 
ried Margaret Cherrington, and this residence, as stated above, 
is owned by Ambrose Fulton, and stands near the old Lancaster 
Turnpike, with the P. C. R, R., to rear of dwelling. In early 
days of P. C. R. R-, the barn belonging to this farm stood near 
the R.R. and was burned by sparks from a locomotive. 

" In 1702, Henry Miller of Bradnich, Dovenshire, married 
Sarah, dau., of George and Dorothy Deeble, of Alcombe, in the 
Parish of Dunster, in County Summerset, England; in a public 
Meeting of the people of God, called Quakers, and in their meet- 
ing Place in Mynehead, in the County of Sommerset. 

In 1714 Henry and Sarah Miller, with their four children, — 
John, Dorothy, Sarah and Henry, emmigrated from England to 
Pennsylvania, and settled in Upper Providence, (Delaware) then 
Chester County. Henry purchased land of Joseph Phipps, John 
and Jacob Edge, Randal and William Malin, Thomas Williamson, 
and Richard Weekstead, amounting to several hundred acres. 
Among the first owners of this tract was George Woodward, John 



34 Gcneaohgy of the Coaf.es Family. 

Houston, John Fox,&c. "No doubt Henry Miller was attracted by 
the fine meadows on Ridley Creek as bearing strong resemblance 
to the beautiful meadows in Devonshire, his native place. Part of 
the old home is still standing (1900), in which the youngest son, 
George, was born, 7, 19, 1716. Henry Miller's wife, Sarah, died 
in 1731 and he died in 1732, about six months later. Both were 
active business members of the Society of Friends. Their daugh- 
ter, Sarah in 1741 married Thomas Coates and settled in Cain 
Township, Chester County, Pa." 

Copy of the Marriage Cirtificate of Thomas Coates and Sarah 
Miller: 

Whereas! Thomas Coates, son of Moses Coates of Charles- 
town, in the County of Chester and Province of Penn. And Sarah 
Miller, daughter of Henry Miller, of Providence, In the County 
and Province aforesaid, deceased. Having declared their inten- 
tions of Marriage before several Monthly Meetings of ye people 
called Quakers at Providence aforesaid, according to the good 
order used among them, and having consent of Parents and re- 
lations concerned, there said proposal of marriage was allowed by 
the said Meeting. 

Now these are to certify whom it may concern that for the 
full accomplishing there said intentions this twenty-first day of 
ye Third Month, in ye year of our Lord. One Thousand seven 
Hundred and Forty-one, They, the said Thomas Coates and 
Sarah Miller, appeared in a Publick Meeting of the said people 
at Providence aforesaid, and the said Thomas Coates taking the 
said Sarah Miller by the hand, did in solurnn manner openly de- 
clare that he took her, the said Sarah Miller to be his wife, 
Promising through Divine assistance to be unto her a Loving 
and faithful husband until death should separate them. And 
then and there in the same assembly the said Sarah Miller did in 
Like manner declare that she took him, the said Thomas Coates, 
to be her husband, Promising through Divine assistance to be un- 
to him a loving and faithful wife until death should separate 
them. And Moreover, They the said Thomas Coates and Sarah 



GeneaoJogy of the Coates Family. 



Miller, she according to the custom of Marriage, assuming the 
name of her husband as a further confirmation, thereof, did then 
and there to these presence set their hands. And we whose 
names are hereunder also subscribed being present at the Solmun- 
ization and Subscription of the said Marriage have as witnesses 
thereunto set our hands the day and year above written. 

Thomas Coaxes, 
Sarah Coates. 
Henry Howard. 
Robert Tiffin y ? 
Sarah Dicks. 
Mary Sharpless. 
James Starr, 
John Needles. 
Hannah Howard. 
Robert Williams. 
George Smedley. 
Henry Camn. 
Robert Russell. 
Benjamin Weldon. 



Susanna Malin. 

Peter Dicks. 

Rachel Starr, Jr. 

Alice Malin. 

Rebecca Camn. 

Elizabeth Miller. 

Elizabeth Russell. 

Sarah Weldon. 



Moses Coates. 

Susanna Coates. 

Samuel Coates. 

Dorothy Miller. 

Gulielma Deeble. 

Susanna Pile. 

Moses Coates, Jr. 

Henry Miller. 

Jane Deeble. 

Elizabeth Coates. 



William Malin. 
George Miller. 



Elizabeth Richardson. 
John Bailey. 



George Deeble. 
Martha Davis. 



Next is Generation D, Children of C. 

B 1. C 2. Susanna Coates. (Thomas, Moses) M: — Joseph 
Gladden. From Bradford M. Mtg. Records. 4 Mo. 12, 1771. 
Complaint was made of Susanna Coates — -now Gladden — for mar- 
riage bj r a Priest, to one not a member. 6 Mo. 14, 1771. Her ac- 
knowledgment accepted, to be read at East Cain. Their children: 

D. i. Samuel. 

2. Sarah, d. UNM. 

3. Elizabeth, M: — Geo. Swift. 1 child, d. young. 

4. Susanna, M: — Thos. Clark, no issue. 

B 1. C 3. Jonathan Coates (Thomas, Moses) M: — Jane 
Carrigan. 12, 13, 1771. Cain complains of Jonathan Coates for 



36 Genealogy of the Co cites Family. 

M. by a Priest to a non- member. 3, 13, 1772. Disowned, testi- 
mony to be read at West Cain. 6, 14, 1782. Jonathan Coates 
certificate form Uwchlan. Their children: — 

D. i. Thomas, b. 9, 13, 1772. Lost at Sea about 1806. 
2. Margaret, b. 3, 20, 1774. 

B 1. C 4. Samuel Coates. (Thomas, Moses); From Brad- 
ford Records. 3, 12, 1779. Samuel Coates, son of Thomas and 
Abigail Thatcher, declare their intentions; his Father present. 4, 
16, 1771. They appear the second time. 5, 14, 1779. Report 
that the marriage was accomplished. 4, 28, 1779. Abigail 
Thatcher, wife of Samuel, was a dau., of Richard and Abigail 
of Kennett Township, Chester Co., Pa., and married at East Cain 
Meeting. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: — 

Samuel Coates, son of Thomas & Sarah Coates, of Cain 
Township, in the County of Chester & Province of Pennsylvania 
& Abigail Thatcher, daughter of Richard and Abigail Thatcher, 
late or formerly of the township of Kennett in the County of 
Chester aforesaid, deceased * * * married 28th. of 4th. Mo. 
1779 at East Cain Meeting. Witnesses:— Thos. Coates, Susanna 
Gladden, Susanna Harlan, Henry Coates, Hannah Thatcher, 
Susanna Thatcher, Joseph Gladden, Jonatn Coates, Olive 
Thatcher, Lydia Mendenhall, Elizabeth Kirk, Moses Coates, 
Mary Coates, Caleb Kirk, Isaac Coates, & others. Their chil- 

D 1. Warrick, b. 1, 29, 1780. d. 2, 1, i860. Int. at Doe Run F. B. G. 

2. Levi, b. to, 21, 1781. d. 5, 18, 1865. Int. at Sadsbury F. B. G. A 

Recommended Minister in Society of Friends. 

3. Richard, b. 7, 23, 1784. d. 6. 7, 1864, in York Co., Pa 

4. Samuel, b. 2, 23, 1786. d. 9, 12, 1826. Int. at East Cain, F. B. G. 

A Recommended Minister in Society of Friends. On a cer- 
tain Fifth-day he preached in E. Cain Meeting, and on follow- 
ing Fifth-day he was taken there a corpse. Dr. Jesse 
Coates was the physician. There is no stone in East 
Clan Grave-yard to the grave of a Coates, but the Coates row 
of graves is immediately to the right hand when entering the 
gate from the west. From Bradford M. Mtg. Records:— 1 2 
1793. Samuel Coates and others to care for E.Cain graveyard. 
6, 15, 179S. Samuel Coates a.pt overseer in Cain Mtg. in room 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 37 

of Benj. Worrall. 

5. Thomas, b. ii, 8, 1787. Was a carpenter by trade, and a roaving 

disposition. Went to Ohio, and afterward to Illinois and 
Tennessee, finally to Louisiana, and is supposed, died in New 
Orleans, UNM. 

6. George, b. n, 28, 1789. d. 5, 8, 1875, °f gangrene of great toe, in 

York Co., Pa., on his farm. 

7. Sarah, b. 3, 26, 1792. d. 5, 26, 1869, on farm near Christiana, Pa. 

Int. at Sadsbury F. B. G. 

8. Joseph, M.D., b. 1, 12, 1794. d. 1, 24, 1832, on his farm near 

Downingtown, Pa. Abigail (Thatcher) Coates died, when 
Samuel married as follows: — From Bradford M. Mtg. records. 
"3, 14, 1800, Samuel Coates Cert, to Exeter to marry Hannah 
Boone." Samuel Coates' second wife, Hannah (Lee) Boone, 
was a widow, who outlived her husband, Samuel, and died in 
East Cain Township, at residence of her stepson, Samuel. I 
was informed she resided alone for a time, but with age she 
was taken into the family as above. 



Next is Generation E, Children of D. 

B 4. C 2. D 1. Samuel Gladden, (Susanna, Thomas, Moses) 
M:— Anna Marsh. They are both int. at Homeville F. B. G. 
Their children: — 

E. 1. Emmor. 

2. Sarah, d. UNM. 

3. Matson. 

4. Coates. 

5. Hannah, UNM. Res. (1903) at Modena, Pa. 

6. Levi, d. of cancer about 1895. 

B 1. C 3. D 1. Thomas Coates, (Jonathan, Thomas, Moses) 
M:— Rachel Free. Children:— 
From Bradford M.m. records: 

S, 12, 1785. Certificate for Thomas Coates. Their children : 
E. t. Mary Ann, b. 3, 20, 1796. d. young. 

2. Jacob, b. 7, 23, 1797. 

3. Eliza, b. 10, 19, 1798. 

B 1. C 3. D 2. Margaret Coates, (Jonathan, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — William Irwin first husband, Samuel McWilliams, 
second. No children recorded. 



38 Geneaolosry of the Coates Family. 

3 1. C 4. D 1. Warrick Coates, (Thomas, Moses) M:— 
Elenor Pusey, dau. of Ellis and Abigail of London Grove Town- 
ship, Chester Co., Pa. Married in London Grove F. M. H., 
4, 3, 1803. E. P., was b. 12, 18, 1781, and died 8, 6, 1840, was a 
fleshy woman and from a fall had her arm fractured and from re- 
sults of same died. They settled on a farm in Londonderry 
Township, same County, where they resided the remainder of 
their natural lives. Both int. at Doe Run F. B. G. Their chil- 
dren: — 

E. i. Ellis, b. 2, i, 1S04. d. s, 22, 1877. Int. at Homeville F. B. G. 

2. Samuel, b. 4, 11, 1806. d. 1. 11, 1855. Int. Homeville F, B. G. 

3. Hartt, G. b. 1, 10, 1S08. d. 11, 21, [873. Int. Eastland F. B. G. 

4. Susanna Pusey, b. 2, 17. 1810. d 4,24, 1S1 1, of dysentery. Int. 

Doe Run F. B. G. 

5. Warrick, Jr., b. 4, 2, 181 1. d. 3, 15, 1897, at his home in Russel- 

ville, Chester Co., Pa. Int. at Homeville F. B. G. 

6. Susanna Pusey, b. 3, 21, 1S31. d. 2, 2, 188S, at her home in Po- 

copsin Township, Chester Co., Pa. Int. at Burmingham F.B.G. 

7. Sarah, b. 2, 17, 1815. d. 3, 22, 1896, at her home near Doe Run 

village, Chester Co., Pa. Int. at Fallowfield F. B. G. 
S. Abigail, b. 4, 30, 1817. Res. in West Chester, Pa. (1906). 
9. Philena, b. 5, 10, 1819. d. 9, 11,1821. Int. at Doe Run F. B. G. 

10. Pusey, b. 5, 20, 1821. d. 3, 22, 1S23. Int. Doe Run F. B. G. 

11. Lewis, b. 7, 5, 1S23. d. to, 2, rSzS, from results of a fall in his 

father's barn. 

12. Philena, b, 12, 29, 1S26. Res. in Oxford, Pa., (1906). 

After the death of Elenor (Pusey) Coates, Warrick married at 
his home in Londonderry Township, Hannah Darlington, 10. 
22, 1846. She died 11, 8, 1855. Warrick was a man of con- 
siderable executive ability, and held positions of trust and over- 
sight in his neighborhood, being guardian for minor children 
and executor of many estates, and a Director of the Lancaster 
and Newport turnpike. Was a farmer and had a brickyard on 
on same farm for many years. 



Natches, Feb. 10, 1832. 
Dear Brother: 

It appears I am not to receive a letter from you or any of 
my Brothers. I have wrote a number of times it appears of no 
use. Should you get this pay more attention, inform me whether 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 39 

you are all living, more particularly my Father and Mother. I 
did expect to have come this spring and seen you all one more 
time on account of my sickness for more than six months with 
the highest sort of expenses its not in my power. You may see 
from ni}*- writing I am not strong. 
Yours with Respt., 

I remain your Brother, 
Dr. Joseph Coates. Thomas Coates. 

N. B. — I have suffered more this summer and fail than I ever 
did in my life. I have lost four pieces of Jaw Bone with teeth 
fast to them. T. C. 

(The subscription on back of same — marking the envelope 
as well is post marked Natches, Feb. 11, addressed to Joseph 
Coates). 

Downings Town, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 



3rd Mo, 31st, 1837. 

Received of Warrick Coates executor of the Estate of his 
Father Samuel Coates of Cain deceased two hundred and one 
dollars it being the provision made by his will for the son Thomas's 
debts as pr sale of lots for that purpose. 

Isaac Wai/ton. 



Warwick Coates 




Take Notice. 


The value of your property 


for 




the present year, is 




$3870 


adjusted to 




9-67 cent 


Tax, at 2 mills and 5-10s 


on 


the dollar, 


Dog-tax 




50 



Appeal at the house of Joseph Wood 
in Iyondongrove April 16, 1829. 

Jehu Claek, Assessor 



40 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Philadelphia Dec 22 1825. 

Received of Warrick Coates two dollars 
Subscription to the Saturday Evening Post, for 12 months, from 
Oct. 15, 1825, to Oct. 15, 1826. 

$1.00 for agt. Chas. Gale. 



Jan. 28, 1818, Received of Warrick Coates the Administrator 
of the estate of Samuel Love Deceased the Sum of Seven Dollars 
in full for a Coffin and Drawing Corps to grave yard. 
$7.00 Reed by D. Crosby. 

10th Mo. 30, 1848. 
Received of Ellis Coates the sum of twenty Dollars the bal- 
ance in full for sawing of stuff for Warrick and Ellis Coates for 
barn. 

Received by me Catharine Robinson 

for James Robinson. 



Warrick Coates please deposit in the Bank of Chester Co. on 
1st day of April, 1850, the following sums on account of his note 
in my hands, viz: 

$800.00 payable to order of Barnaby & Whinnery,tobe drawn 
in New York. 

$650.00 payable to order of James Barnaby, which may be 
drawn either in New York or Phila. 

Both these sums or drafts for them, to be enclosed and mailed 
in West Chester on the same day, to be sent to James Barnaby, 
care of Fowler & Wells, No. 131 Nassau St., New York. 

$200.00 Payable to order of Uriah Hunt & Son, Phila., to 
John C. Whinnery, Salem, Columbiana Co., O. 

$20.00 ) 
20.00 >■ Payable to my order. 
31.00 ) Sarah Coates, March 15th, 1850. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 41 

COPY OF WILL OF WARRICK COATES, SR. 

Be it remembered that I Warrick Coates, of the township of 
Londenderry in the County of Chester and State of Pennsylvania 
being in my usual health but remembering the uucertancy of life 
& the certancy of death, thought right for me to make and pub- 
lish this, my last Will and Testament, as follows, viz: 

Item 1st. I give and bequeath to my son Ellis Coates, his 
heirs and assigns for Ever all my undivided half part of the farm 
we bought of James Fleming, adm., of Win. Fleming, Contain- 
ing 180 Acres of land together with all my undivided half part 
of all the stock that may be on the sd. farm at the time of my 
death, such as Cattle, Hogs or Sheep, Dairy Fixtures, grain in 
the ground and all articles that may jointly belong to us at that 
time (Except Back dues from the tenant) Subject However to 
the following payments and encumbrances: — said Ellis Coats to 
pay H. G. Coates four hundred dollars & to the rest of my Chil- 
dren five hundred dollars apiece, Namely, W. Coates, Jr., S. P. 
Darlington, S. C. Wood, A. Hoopes, and P. C. Lynch, lately 
intermarried with J. Lynch, Jr., or their legal representatives, 
said payments to be due & payable at my death & remain a lien 
upon said Farm till paid. 

Item 2. I give and bequeath to my daughter P. C. Lynch 
the cow she now calls her own; my Riding Carriage with the 
new T harness belonging thereto, the carpet and stove in my lodg- 
ing room, the looking glass, one feathe bed bedstead & bedding 
and also the Bureau belonging in the 2nd best room upstairs, 
The large chest in the Garret, the old arm chair and such arti- 
cles about the house as is understood to belong to her, and also 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars worth of other articles of the 
house goods to be taken at the appraisment, Provided she re- 
mains with me as housekeeper & caretaker during the remainder 
of my life. 

Item 3rd. I give and bequeath to my Grand daughter Ele- 
nor Darlington 1 feather bed bedstead and bedding. 

Item 4th. I give and bequeath to my Grand daughter, Ele- 



42 Gcneaology of the Chafes Family. 

nor Hoopes 1 feather bed beadstead and bedding. Item 5th. I 
give and bequeath to my two Grand daughters, Lydia Coates & 
Edith Coates, Daughters of H. G. Coates; three silver tablespoons 
each, marked H. D. Item 6th. I give and bequeath to Mary 
Gerety the cow called her own, the bed bedstead & bedding she 
now occupies in my house; and fifty-five dollars, provided she re- 
mains with me as now during the remainder of my life. And 
lastly I do appoint my son Ellis Coates & 1113^ son-in-law Thomas 
Wood to be my Executors of this my last Will and Testament, 
fully authorizing and empowering them to sell all my personal 
and real estate (except what I have herein willed to my son Ellis 
my daughter Philena my four grand daughters Eleuor Darlington, 
Elenor Hoopes, Lydia & Edith Hoopes & Mary Garety) to make 
and execute Deeds to the purchaser or purchasers which is held 
to be as good & affectual in law as if executed by myself and af- 
ter paying all my just debts and funeral expenses to divide the 
residue & remainder of my estate amongst my children or their 
legal representatives, namely; Hart G. Coates, Warrick Coates, 
Jr., Susanna P. Darlington, Sarah C. Wood, Abigail Hoopes, 
and Philena C. Lynch, share and share alike, except one thous- 
and dollars oi my daughter Philena's share which I direct to be 
secured in such a way as my above named Executors may think 
best, that she may receive interest therefrom annually until the 
death of her husband at which time it is to be paid to her or her 
legal representatives, yet should she become needy during her 
husband's lifetime, my Executors may pay to her such sums as 
they may think necessary out of the principle. And I hereby 
revoke and cancel all other Wills by me heretofore made declared 
this and this only to be my last Will and Testament. 

In witness whereof I Warwick Coates the Testator, have to 
this, my Will, set my hand and seal, this twenty first day of ninth 
month in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 

fifty eight. 

Warrick Coates, (Seal) 

Signed sealed and delivered in the 
presence of us who have subscribed 
as witnesses in the presence of each 
other this twenty first day of ninth 
month 1858. 

Daniel Kent. 

Isaac Hall. 



Geneaology of the Co cites Family. 43 

Whereas, I, Warrick Coates of the Township of London- 
derry County of Chester State of Pennsylvania have made & 
declared my last Will and Testament in writing, bearing date the 
twenty first day of ninth month 1858. Now I do hereby de- 
clare this present writing to be a Codicil to my said Will and di- 
rect the same to be annexed thereto and taken as part thereof. 
Now I hereby appoint and constitute my son Warrick Coates, Jr. 
one of my Executors instead of my son Ellis Coates, which is 
named as one of my Executors in the body said Will and Testa- 
ment. In witness thereof, I the said Warrick Coates to this Cod- 
icil set my hand and seal this twenty-sixth day of third month 
eighteen hundred and fifty-nine. 

Warrick Coates. (Seal) 
Signed in the presence of us, and 
in the presence of each other, 
DanieIv Kent. 
Isaac Hall. 

Proven in West Chester, Chester Co., Pa., 2, 8, 1860, in Reg- 
isters Office. 

Amariah Strickland, Register. 



B 1. C 4. D 2. Eevi Coates (Samuel, Thomas, Moses). 
Was born in Cain Township, Chester County, Pa. Was a far- 
mer, and carried on a Pottery. Having settled in Londonderry 
Township, after marrying Mary Truman, 4, 12, 1809, dau., of 
James and Elizabeth (Dickinson), of Sadsbury Township, Lan. 
Co., Pa. Mary was bom 4, 3, 1791, died 5. 7, 1816. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. records: 

12. 17, 1798. Levi Coates, son of Samuel, Cert., toUwchlan. 
Their children: 

E. i. Truman, b. 3, S, 181 1. d. 4, 9, 1893, of cancer of throat. Int. at 
Horaeville F. B. G. UNM. 

2. Hannah, b. 11, 30, 1S13. d. 3, 3, 1S70. 

3. Phebe, b. 9, 19, 1815. d io, 23, 1855. Int. at Homeville F. B. G. 
Mary (Truman) Coates died, when Levi married Ann Smith. 

Children:— 



44 Geneaology af the Coaics Family. 

2-1. Mary, b. 5. 10, 1S20. d. 8, 31, 18S0 

2-2. Joseph, b. 4, 23, 1822. d. 1838, was hurt on ice while attending 

school at West Grove, Pa. 
2-3. Amos, b. 8, 25, 1824. d. 11, 24, 1894. Int. at Doe Run F. B. G. 
2-4. James, b. 9, 14, 1825, d. ti, 19, 1866. 
2-5. Elizabeth, b. 9. 9, 1827. Res. Germantown, Pa. (1905). 
2-6. Ellen Smith, b. 8. 16, 1839. Res. 2019 Arch St., Phila., Pa. (1906) 
2-7. George, b. 10, 2, TS31. d. 6, 20, 1905, of gangrene. Int. at Doe 

Run F. B. G. Died on his farm, formerly his father's in 

Londonderry Township, Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 3. Richard Coates (Samuel, Thomas, Moses) 
M:— Rebecca Walker, 4. 11, 1810. She was b. 8. 21, 1791, and 
died 9. 11, 1814, at the home of her father, Asahel Walker, in 
vSadsbury Township, Lan. Co., Pa. Their children: 

E. 1. Samuel, d. young. 

2. Abigail, d. young. 

3. Joseph, d. at 3 years, drowned in his father's pool, where he 

washed hats. 

Richard was a Hatter. At above time Richard resided in 
Londonderry Township, Chester Co., Pa., but afterward moved 
to York Co., Pa., where he died. After death of Rebecca, 
Richard married Margaret Criswell, a widow, with one child 
Nathan Creswell. Their children : — 
2-1. Samuel A., b. 2, 1, 1825. 2-2. Sarah Jane, b. 8, S, 182S. 
2-3. Hannah Susanna, b. 2, 3, 183 1. 2-4. Ann Margaret, b. 3, 27, '37. 
d. 1900. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. Samukl Coates, (Samuel, Thomas, Moses) 
M: — -Margaret Cherrington, dan. of Thomas and Rachel (L,ee) 
2, 2, 1809, at Exeter Friends Meeting, Berks Co., Pa., by Friends 
Ceremony. Margaret died, 1. 2, 1852, at home of her dau., 
Anna Moore, in Coleraine Twpt., I^an. Co., Pa. Children: — 

E. 1. Abigail, b. 10, 20, 1S09. d. 12, 21, 1S97, at home of her dau. 
Sarah, in Drumoore, Lan. Co., Pa. Int. at Drumoore, F.B.G. 

2. Rachel, b. 8, 14, 1S11. d. 8, 1, 1851, of dysentery. 

3. Anna, b. 5, 28, '13. d. 7, 5, 1S77. Int. Druemore F. B. G. 

4. Esther, M.D., b. 10, 19, 1S15. d. 3, 18, 1873, in Florida. Int. at 

Drumoore F. B. G. Lan, Co. t Pa, 

5. Cherrington, b. 6, 15, 1S17. d. 1, 5, 1902, in Monmouth, 111., 

where he was Int, 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 45 

6. Joseph, b. i, 17, 1820. d. 2, 12, 1822. 

7. Mary, b. 1, 6, 1822. d. 2, 28, 1893. Int. at Druemoore, Lan. Co., 

Pa! F. B. G. 

8. Sarah, M.D., b. 3, 7, [834, d. 2, 2j, 1886. Int. at Galena, III., 

where she resided. 

After the marriage of Samuel and Margaret (Cherrington) 
Coates they settled on a farm in Cain Twpt., Chester Co., Pa., 
which was one-half of his father's farm, a part of the original 
Thomas Coates homestead, in a house near and south of the 
Philadelphia and Pittsburg turnpike, with P.R.R. to the rear 
of buildings. Samuel was a minister in Society of Friends* 
and was int. at East Cain F. B. G, 

Whereas, Samuel Coates, Junr., of East Cain Township, in 
the County of Chester, in the State of Pennsylvania, Son of 
Samuel Coates, of the same place, and Abigail, his wife (She 
being now deceased), and Margaret Cherrington, daughter of 
Thomas Cherrington of Exeter Township, in the County of 
Berks, and State aforesaid, and Rachel his wife, having declared 
their intentions of marriage with each other, before a monthly 
meeting of the religious Societ} 7 of Friends, held alternately at Ex- 
eter aforesaid and Maidencreek, according to the good order sued 
among them, and having consent of Parents their proposal of 
marriage was allowed of by the said meeting. Now these are to 
certify whom it may concern, that for the full accomplishment of 
their Said intentions, this Second day of the Second month, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and nine, they 
the Said Samuel Coates and Margaret Cherrington appeared in a 
public meeting of the Said People held at Exeter aforesaid, and 
the Said Samuel Coates taking the Said Margaret Cherrington 
by the hand, did on this Solumn occasion, openly declare, that 
he took her, the Said Margaret Cherrington, to be his wife, prom- 
ising, with Divine assistance, to be unto her a loving and faithful 
Husband until death Should separate them; and then, in the 
same Assembly, the Said Margaret Cherrington, did in the 
manner declare, that she took him the Said Samuel Coates to be 



46 



Geneaology of the Coaies Family. 



her Husband, promising with Divine assistance, to be unto him 
a loving and faithful wife, until death Should Separate them. 
And, moreover, the Said Samuel Coates and Margaret Cherring- 
ton (she according to the custom of marriage assuming the name 
of her Husband) did as a further confirmation thereof, then and 
to these present Set their hand. 

Samukl Coates, Jun. 

Margaret Coates, 

And we whose names are also hereunto Subscribed, being 
present at the Solumnization of the Said marriage and Subscrip- 
tion, have, as Witnesses thereto Set our hands the day and year 
above written: 
Mordbcai Lee, Jn. 
Jacob Warren. 
Benja. Wright. 
Mary Wright. 
Enos Lee. 
Ann Lee. 

Benjn. Wright, Jn. 
Daniel Cox. 
Isaac Chrisman. 
Hannah Chrisman. 
Abel Thomas, Jr. 
Jacob Thomas. 
Abner Thomas. 
John Evans. 
Jane Evans. 
Amos Lee. 



Samuel Lee. 

Sarah Pim. 

Edith Whitaker. 

Zilla Coates. 

Eleanor Lee. 



Frances Lee. 

Ruth Lee. 

Elizabeth Boone. 

Charles Lee. 

Thos. Cherrington. 



Sarah Lee. Rachel Cherrington. 

Rachel Boone. John Cherrington. 

John Lee, Jr. William Cherrington. 

Richard Coates. Thomas Coates. 

Mary Cherrington. Levi Coates. 

Ellis Lee. Samuel Lee, Junr. 

Mary P. Lee. George Coates. 

John Lee. Jerm. Lee. 

Elizabeth Lee. Anthony Lee. 

Sarah Coates. Robert Hillis. 



Inventory of goods and chatties and credits of Samuel Coates, 
of Cain Township in Chester County (deceased), taken the 10th 
of 2 mo., 1833: 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 47 

Dol. Cts. 

Wearing apparel $20.00 

Cash on hand 97.62% 

Desk 12.00 

Clock 30.00 

Books 1.00 

Notes and interest on them 170.13 

Book accounts 62.92 

Two buckles. 1.50 

Two potracks & Coffee mill 1.00 

Carpet 1.50 

3 pairs of spectacles & scales, weights, &c , . 6.00 

Lot of razors straps and shaving box 1.00 

Two chairs 62 % 

$405.30 



1 mo. 23, 1834. 

Received of Warrick Coates, Executor of the Estate of 
Samuel Coates, deceased, seven hundred dollars on account of a 
legacy bequeathed to my wife, Abigail, in his last Will. 

ELivis Coatks. 



2 mo., 1834. 

Received of Warrick Coates, executor of the Estate of Samuel 
Coates, Deceased, four hundred and forty-eight dollars and two 
cents, it being the legac} r in full bequeathed in his last Will to me 

and my wife for me. 

Asahel Walker. Jr. 

West Bradford Boarding School, 

4 mo. 23, 1836. 
Margaret Coates, 

To C. Hannun. 
To 3 months tuition & boarding her son 

Cherrington $30.00 

Washing 3.00 

To Books, 1 Nomenclature (25), Blairs Phil- 
osophy (56), French Tables 75, Civil En- 
gineering, 1.50 3.06 

Paper & quills 31 

$36.37 

Red'd payment for the above in full 

Cheyney Hannun. 



48 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Received of Warrick Coates, gueardean of Cherrington 
Coates, the above stated amount in full, & also Six dollars for 
boarding, washing, &c. for my son Cherrington Coates. 

Margaret Coatks. 



11th mo. 8th, 1838. 

Received of Warrick Coates (Gueardean) of my daughters 
Mary and Sarah Coates, sixty dollars to be applied to paying 
their boarding and tuition at Boarding school. 

Margaret Coates. 



11 mo. 8th, 1838. 

Received of Warrick Coates One hundred dollars in part and 
on Account of my Legacy in his hands. 

($100.00) . Anna Coates. 

Cain, 8th mo. 6th, 1838. 
Received of Warrick Coates (by hand of Ellis Coates) the 
sum of twenty-five dollars, being part of interest money due me. 
($25.00). Esther Coates. 



This is to certify, that on the thirty-first day of August in 
the year of our Lord 1817 George Coates of Chester County and 
Martha B. Irvine of Lancaster County were joined in Marriage, 
before me the subscriber, one of the Aldermen of the City of 
Philadelphia, they having previously declared themselves free re- 
spectively from prior engagements, or other lawful impediments. 
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and 
(seat^) the day and year above written. 

G. Badger, Alder. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. George Coates (Samuel, Thomas, Moses). 
M:— Martha B. Irwin, 8, 31, 1817, as copy of Mar. Cert, will 
show. Their children: 

E. i. Sarah Jane, b. 12, 21, 1820; d. 7, 29, 1S49. 
2. Margaret, b. 2, 18, 1824; d, 1, 27, 1891. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 49 

3. George Thomas, b. 3, 31, 1837; d. in York Co., Pa. UNM. 

4. Samuel, b. 9, 12, 1S29; d. in York Co., Pa., UNM. 

5. Joseph Rubincan, b. 5, 12, 1834; d. 3, 23, 1902, of pneumonia, at 

his home at Richardsmere, Cecil Co., Md. Int. at West Not- 
tingham F.B.G. 

6. Phebe Ann, b. 4, 2, 1838; d. 1S79, of consumption in York Co., Pa. 

Martha (Irwin) Coates died when George married Jehoshaba 
Brown King Hambleton, eldest dau., of Nathan an Rachel 
Brown. No issue in this union. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. Sarah Thatcher Coates (Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses). M:— Asahel Walker, 10, 20, 1813, son of Asahel and 
Ann, of Sadsbury Twpt., Lancaster Co., Pa. Asahel was b. 2, 
7, 1788; married in East Cain Meeting House; resided on a farm 
in Sadsbury Twpt., Lancaster Co., Pa. He died 1, 12, 1856, 
and Sarah d. 5, 25, 1869. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. records: Asahel Walker, the younger, 
of Sadsbury Township, Lancaster County, Pa., son of Asahel, of 
same place, and Ann his wife, and Sarah Thatcher, daughter of 
Samuel Coates of East Cain Township, County of Chester, and 
State of Pa., and Abigail, the latter deceased, * * * married 
20th of 10th mo., 1813. Witnesses: Asahel Walker, Ann Walker, 
Saml. Coates, Hannah Coates, Samuel Coates, Jr.. Margaret 
Coates, Rachel Boone, Richard Coates, Rebecca Coates, Joseph 
Coates, Thomas Coates, George Coates, Moses Coates, Junr. , 
Grace Coates, Deborah Coates & others. Their children: 
E. 1. Anna, b. 6, 19, 1S10; d. 10, 26, 1846. 

2. Susanna, b. 6, 29, 1S20; d. 3, 26, 1882, at her home in Upper Ox- 

ford Twpt., wife of Pusey Barnard. 

3. Phebe, b. S, 15, 1829; d. 8, 12, 1891, in Phila., Pa. 

4. Sarah, b. 9, 1, 1825; d. 8, 25, 1891, at her home near Chatham, Pa. 

5. Samuel, b. 11,9, 1837; d. 1, 27, 1897, at his home near Christiana, 

Penna. 

6. Asahel, b. 10, 9, 1829; d. 1, 4, 1893. Married Margaret E. Cornog ? 

One son. 

7. Joseph Coates, b. 4, 4, 1832. 

8. Mary Alice, b. 6, 19, 1834. 

9. Margaretta, b. 4, 15, 1840. 

B1.C4. D 8. Joseph Coatks, M.D. (Samuel, Thomas, 



50 Gen etiology of the Coates Family. 

Moses). M: — Ann Jones Roberts, dait. of John and Elizabeth, of 
West Whiteland Twpt., Chester Co., Pa., 12, 8, 1822. Their 
child: 

E. i. Elizabeth R., b. io, io, 1823; d. io, 23, 1896, at her home near 

Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. Joseph Coates died, when his widow married Thomas R- 
Mathews, of Bait., Md., 9, 23, 1840. 

B 1. C 3. D 3 Eliza Coates. (Thomas, Jonathan, Thomas, 
Moses). M:— John Schlasser in 1853. They had twelve children. 

Generation E, Chilldren of E. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. Ellis Coates. (Warrick, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses") M: — Abigail Coates, his first cousin, a dau. of 
Samuel and Margaret (Cherrington) Coates, of E. Cain Township. 
Ellis lived and died on his farm in Upper Oxford Township, 
Chester Co., Pa., near Homeville, and buried in F.B.G. at Home- 
ville. Their children: 

F. 1. Sarah Walker, b. 2, 7, 1S31. 

2. Margaret, b. 7, 7, 1832. 

3. Samuel, b. 2, 31, 1836; d. 10, 13, 1836. Int. in Doe Run F. B. G. 

4. Samuel, b. n, 17, 1838. 

5. Mary, b. 12, 24, 1840; d. i, 18, 1856, of pneumonia. Int. in Home- 

ville F.B.G. 

6. Lewis, b. 2, n, 1843. 

7. Phebe Anna, b. 2, 30, 1846; d. 6, 29, 1846. Int. in Homeville 

F.B,G. 

8. Joseph, b. 8, 17, 1848; d. S, 17, 1850. Int. in Homeville F. B. G . 

B 1. C 4. D 1 E 3. Hartt Grandum Coates (Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas Moses). M: — Eliza Darlington, who wa. c born 
8, 9, 1814. Died 1, 5, 1889. Hartt and wife were buried in 
Eastland F.B.G. Lancaster Co., Pa. M. 11, (4 or 5) 1833 to 
Eliza dau. of George and Lydia (Barnard) Darlington. They 
resided on a farm in Lower Oxford Township, Chester Co,, Pa., 
on which, at one time, was a flour and feed mill, including a 
"Sorgum" mill. Their children: 

F. 1. Lydia, b. 2, 14, 1835; d. 9, 26, 1869. Int. at Eastland F.B.G. 

2. Warrick, b. 8, 8, 1837; d. 11, 1, 1837. Int. in Eastland F.B.G. 

3. Edith, b. 7, 13, 1839. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 51 

4. George Darlington, b. to, 31, 1840, 

5. Granville, b, 7, 3, 1843. 

6. Howard, b. 10, 30, 1S45. 

7. Stephen, b. 5, 30. 1S4S. 

B1.C4.D1.E5. Warrick Coates (Warrick, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses). M: — Rutbanna, dan. of William and Susanna 
(Cutler) Cook, of Pleasant Grove, Lancaster Co., Pa., in Little 
Britian k 'Penn Hill" Friends Meeting House, 3, 24, 1842, as a 
copy of their Marriage Certificate will hereinafter describe. Same 
Spring the}' settled on a farm in Upper Oxford Township, Chester 
Co., Pa. Their children: 

F. i. Susanna, b. 2, 13, 1S43. 

2. Pusey, b. 5, 5, 1844. 

3. Truman, M.D., b. 1, 21, 1S52. 

4. Harvey, b. 7, 2, 1853, d, 1, 25, 1855, of pneumonia. Int. at Home- 

villeF.B.G. 

In Spring of 1877, Warrick and Ruthanna moved from their 
farm in Upper Oxford Township to a part of their son-in-law's 
dwelling, and on S, 1, 1877, moved into their new home in Russel- 
ville, same township, where Warrick died 3, 15, 1S97 and his 
widow passed from earth at the home of her daughter, Susanna 
Wood, 5, 15, 1899, twenty-six months after life's companion, on 
same day of the month, week (second), and within less than an 
hour (1 p. m.) of the day. My Angel Mother's passing words 
were: "It is a beautiful place if we are only always eood." A 
spiritual-minded woman, and has the reward of the righteous 
life lived while in the flesh, of "Well done," from acts to re- 
wards. 

Warrick Coates, Jr., and his brother, Ellis, before their mar- 
riage, made a trip on horseback, to the Niagara Falls in the 
autumn of 1S35. An instance is herewith stated of their exper- 
ience. Much of the country through which they passed was in 
a wild, uncultivated state, and mountaneous, and wild animals 
were not infrequently seen by them. On one occasion, not find- 
ing a lodging place for the night, early in the evening they heard 
in the distance the screams of a wildcat which seemed to be ap- 
proaching them. Father said that was not an enviable time in 
their journey, but the animal did not come very near, conse- 
quently they were not molested, but soon came to a cotter's 
home where they were hospitably received for the night, as was 
the practice in thinly inhabited locations in those days. This 



52 Geneaology af the Coates Family. 

was in Potter Co., Pa. The trip each way from their home in 
Londonderry Twpt., near Cochranville, (now, 1905, owned by 
Harvey Spencer) required nine days riding. 

Not feeling that he was ready to settle for life, before seeing 
more of our county, Warrick, in 1839, with a friend, Nathan 
Linton, started on foot, on a western journey. In this way and 
by stage and canal they reached Ohio and passed through the 
town of Salem, where forty- three years afterward I was married 
to one of Salem's daughters. They wended their way to Cincin- 
nati, where father decided to buy ahorse and assume his favorite 
way of travel. This steed was young and spirited, and being 
untrained, showed inclination to be treacherous, when father, to 
bring the colt to subjection, rode him pretty hard for two days, 
and overtired his new animal and was compelled to rest him a 
day; during this day there came two Virginia planters on horse- 
back on same errand, sightseeing to the West. They were soon 
acquainted rode together, and became very much attached to 
each other. 

They were companions until they traveled to one hundred and 
twenty-five miles west of Jefferson City, Mo. On their homeward 
journey they boarded, with their horses, at St. Louis, on a vessel 
bound for Louisville, Ky. Leaving this vessel, the planters 
bought a number of horses while passing through Ohio, which 
Father helped to care for until they reached Harper's Ferry, 
Maryland, where they parted, never to meet again in this life. 

T. C. 

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE OF WARRICK COATES, JR., AND 
RUTHANA (COOK) COATES. 

Whereas, Warrick Coates, Jr., of Londonderry Township, 
in the County of Chester, in the State of Pennsylvania, son of 
Warrick Coates, of the same place, and Elenor. his wife, (she 
being deceased), and Ruthanna Cook, daughter of William Cook 
of Little Britain Township in the County of Lancaster, and State 
aforesaid, and Susanna his wife, having declared their intentions 
of marriage with each other before a Monthly Meeting of the 
religious society of Friends held at Little Britain. * * * 
Married 24th day of 3 mo., 1842, in a public meeting at Little 
Britain Meeting House, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

Warrick Coates, Jr. 
Ruth Anna Coates. 



Gaieaology of the Coates Family. 



53 



gardner fukness 
James Smedley 
Jeremiah Brown, Jr. 
Timothy Haines, Jr. 
Thomas Stubbs 
Wii/uam Hatton, Jr. 
Azariah Brown 
Sarah Holcomb 
Susanna C. Stubbs 
Rebecca H. Stubbs 
Martha L. Stubbs, Jr. 
Thomas Stubbs, Jr. 
Daniel Stubbs, Jr. 
Lewis Brown 
Timothy Haines 
Rachel Hutton 
John Dunn Stubbs 
Charles C. Kinsey 
Warrick Coates 



John Kirk 

Deborah Kirk 

Mary Stubbs 

John Stubbs 

Amos King 

Adrian a Thomas 

Joseph Thomas 

Priscilla S. Pakry 

Thomas Smedley 

Sarah Smedley 

Emmor Smedley 

Gilipin Stubbs 

Sidney Hoopes 

Abigail Coates 

Mary \V. Coates 

Julia Ann Cook 

Alban Cutler 

Elwood M. Stubbs 



James Barnard 

Alice B. Caldwell 

Alice K Boyd 

Mary Kirk 

Elizabeth Smedley 

Mary Russell 

Joseph C. Stubbs 

John H. Bicknell 

Eli Smedley 

AllenCook 

Rachel H. Cook 

Franklin Cook 

Philena P. Cook 

Clarkson Cook 

Eliza L. Cook 

Reuben Cook 

Mark Haines 

Mercy C. Haines 



B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. Susanna Pusey Coates. (Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — George, son of George and Lydia 
(Barnard) Darlington, by Friends Ceremony, at Fallowfield 
Monthly Meeting, 11, 23, 1833. George died 5, 15, 1888; Sus- 
anna died 2, 2, 1898. Lived all their married lives in Pocopsin 
Township, Chester Co., Pa., on a farm. They had for years a 
cotton factory, also a flour mill on same farm. Their children: 

F. i. Eleanor, b. 8, 13, 1834. 

2. Lydia Ann, b. 3, 23, 1836; d. 2, 9, 1905, in West Chester, Pa., at 

home of her brother. Int. at Birmingham F.B.G. 

3. Sarah Maria, b. 7, 4, 1838, 

4. Hannah, b, 9, 13. 1840; d. 1, 15, 1885, of consumption. Int. at 

Birmingham F.B.G. 

5. Susan R., b. 10, 30, 1843. 

6. Mary Jane, b. 2, 3, 1849. 

7. George W., b. 5, 18, 1853. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 7. Sarah Coates. (Warrick, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Thomas Wood, son of John and Lydia 
(Swayne) Wood, 2, 10, 1841, in Doe Run F. M. H., by Friends 
Ceremony. They both died on their farm near Doe Run Village 



54 Geneaology of the Coatcs Family. 

Chester Co., Pa., Thomas died 1, 21, 1892, and Sarah 3, 22, 
1896. Both int. in F.B.G. at Fallowfield (Ercildoun). Their 
children: 

F. i. Lydia, b. n, 4, 1842. 

2. Elenor C, d, about one year old. 

3. Ellis P., b. 11, 14, 1S46. 

4. Philena, b. 2, 9, 1S49. 

5. Laura, b. 11, 23, 1S52; d. 1, 21, 1866. 

6. Morris T., b. 12, 1, 1857. 

B1.C4.D1. E 8. Abigail Coates (Warrick, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Francis Pratt Hoopse. Their children: 
F. 1. Ellen, b. 4, 1S46, U.N.M. 

2. Mary J., b. 9, 7, 1848. 

3. Morton, b. 9, 9, 1850; d. 4, 19, 1892, on his farm in Upper Oxford 

Township, Chester Co., Pa. 

4. Henry, b. 4, 13, 1S53; d. 5, 29, 18S9, of consumption. 

5. Warrick, H. b. 10, 11, 1856. 

6. Sarah Scarlet, b. 2, 26, 1859; d. 4, 21, 1899, in Harrisburg, Pa., 

infant also. Int. in London Grove F.B.G., Chester Co., Pa. 
M: — 9, 5, 1894, Emil Taube, a musician. 

7. William, d. in infancy, from smallpox, contracted from the doc- 

tor who was attending the mother, Abigail. Their domestic 
also contracted the disease and died. 

Abigail (Coates) Hoopse and husband resided on a farm near 

Chatham, Chester Co., Pa., for many years, when they moved to 

West Chester, Pa., where F. P. Hoopse died and where Abigail 

(1905) yet resides. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 12. Philena Coates. (Warrick, Samuel, 

Thomas, Moses) M: — James Lynch, son of James and Mary 

(Hoy) Lynch. Children: 

F. 1. Anna Mary, b. 5, 1858. 

2. Ella Warrick, b. 2, 9, 1861. 

3. Susan, b. 4, 10, 1864. 

4. Laura, b. 5, 29, 1866. 

James Lynch was a soldier in the 124th Pa. Volunteers in the 
late Civil War. Afterward he was elected to the office of Pro- 
thonotary of the County of Chester, State of Pa. They now 
(1905) reside in Oxford, some county. Their daughter Anna, is 
a teacher in Friend Central School, 15th and Race Sts., Phila., 
Pa- Jas. Lynch died in Oxford, Pa., 9,28, 1905. Int. Doe Run F.B.G. 
B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2. Truman Coates (Levi, Samuel, 



(rcnealogy of the Coates Family 55 

Thomas, Moses) Lived on his farm in Coleraine Township, 
Lancaster Co., Pa., where he died UNM. He was a stock dealer 
and butcher. Was a successful business man. In his will he 
left bequests to his relatives and also to Friends Meetings at 
Homeville, where he was buried, and to Penns Grove, Chester 
Co., Pa., and also a considerable bequest to a Children's Home 
in Lancaster City, Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D2. E2. Hannah Coates (Levi, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — Ezra, son of Enoch and Sarah (Swayne) Gray. 

From Fallowfield M. M. Records: 

2, 7, 1835. Ezra Gray and Hannah Coates having consent of 
surviving parents, laid their intentions of marriage with each 
other before this Meeting. Ezra is requested to produce a cer- 
tificate of his clearness of similar engagements to our next Meet- 
ing. 

3, 7, 1835. A certificate for Ezra Gray from New Garden 
M. M. dated the 5th inst., was received and nothing appearing 
to prevent his proceeding in marriage with Hannah Coates, they 
were therefore left at liberty to accomplish it according to Discip- 
line. Joshua Speakman and Warrick Coates, Sr., were appointed 
to have an oversight thereof, and to hand the certificate to the Re- 
corder and report. 

4, 11, 1835. Information was received that the marriage of 
Ezra Gray and Hannah Coates was orderly accomplished, and 
the certificate was handed to the Recorder. Their children: 

F. [. Mary Ann, b. 8, 15, 1836, UNM. Has (1905) a store on Market 
St., Wilmington, Del. 

2, Enoch C, d. at home of Chackley Webster, near Homeville, 

Chester Co., Pa., of consumption. 

3. Lucretia Mott, M. Frank Hickman, D.D.S. Res. at Bound 

Brook, N.J. (1903). 

B 1. C. 4. D 2. E3. Phebe Coates (Eevy, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — Pusey Barnard, son of Jeramiah and Abigail (Pusey) 
of Doe Run, Pa. Pusey was b. 12, 16, 1810, and Phebe died 10, 
28, 1855. 

From Fallowfield M. M. Records: 

3, 7, 1835. Pusey Barnard and Phebe Coates, having con. 



56 Gciictwlog'y of the Coatcs Family. 

<ent of surviving parents, laid their intentions of marriage with 
each other before this Meeting. Ebenezer Maule and Richard 
.Darlington are appointed to enquire into the young man's clear- 
ness of similar engagements and report at next meeting. 

4, 1835. Nothing appearing to prevent Pusey Barnard pro- 
ceeding in marriage with Phebe Coates, they were therefore left 
at liberty to accomplish it agreeable to discipline. Joseph Wal- 
ton and Joseph Taylor were appointed to have oversight thereof 
and to hand the Certificate to the Recorder and report. 

5, 9, 1835. Overseers inform that the marriage of Pusey 
Barnard and Phebe Coates was orderly accomplished, and the 
certificate left in the hands of the Recorder. Their children: 

F. i. James Truman, b. 2, 13, 1836. 

2. Mary Louisa, b. 5, 16, 1838; d. 3, 6, 1873, in Christians, Pa. 

Wife of Brinton Walter. No children. 

3. Rebecca T., b. 5, 16, 1840; d. 3, 2, 1843. Int. at Homeville F.B.G. 

4. Anna M., b. 9, 31, 1844; d. 2, 16, 1847. Int. at Homeville F.B.G. 

Pusey afterward married Susan (Walker) Pownall, of Chris- 
tiana, Pa., where they both died, after leaving their farm in Up- 
per Oxford Twpt., Chester Co., Pa., near Bell Bank, Lancaster 
Co., Pa. 
B 1. C 4. D 2. E2-1. Mary Coates (Levi, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — Coates Preston, 11, 1855. Resided in Chester, Pa. 

One child: 

F. 1. Carrol, died at age of a few months. 

Mary (Coates) Preston died 8,31, 1880, in Chester, Pa. 
B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-3. Amos Coates. (Levi, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — Sarah, dan. of Isaac and Hannah (Kirk) Pierce. 
Sarah was born 3, 14, 1829, and died 3, 2, 1896. Int. Doe Run 
F.B.G. Their children: 

F. 1. Anna Hannah, b. 11,9, 1856. M:— Charles Lewis. Res. (1905) 
in Passadena, Cal. No children. 

2. Mary Pierce, b. 5, 30, 1859. 

3. John Truman, b. 4, 10, 1863. 

4. Lydia Irea, b. 5, 7, 1866. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-4. James Coatks. (Levi, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M: — Lydia Ann Moore, who was born 9, 30, J 833. Mar- 
ried in Philadelphia, lived on a farm on Octoraro Creek, Cole- 
raine Township, Lancaster Co., Pa. Their children: 



Gcneaology oj the Coates Family, 57 

F. i. Charles, b. 9, 27, 1S56; d, 4, 24, 1S60. 

2. Virginia, b. 9, 6, 1S5S; d. i860. 

Both buried in Homeville F.B.G. 

3. Leora. M: — Harry Cooper. Their children: 1. Roy, 2. Her- 

bert, 3. Burleigh. 

4. Cordelia, b. 10, 4, 1S64. 

5. Elizabeth, b. 12, 14, 1S66. 

B 1 C 4. D 2. E 2-5. Ellen Smith Coates. (Levi, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Isaac Jackson, who was born 3, 3, 1829. 
Married 5, S, 1S54. Isaac died 11, 15, 186S at "Harmony 
Grove," West Grove, Chester Co., Pa. Their children: 

F. 1. Lora, M.D., b. 9, 30, 1S55. M:-Wra, W. Blackman, M.D. 
Res. Brooklyn, N.Y. Children: 1. Elinor, 2 Wm. Jackson, 
2. William, b. 12, 2A t 18.57. M:— Ellen Jackson. Res. on Arch St.,. 
Phila., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 2-7. George Coates (Levi, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Sarah Clark, of Londonderry Township, 
Chester Co., Pa. Their children: 

F. 1. Charles Sumner, b. 1, 1, 1S64. 

2. William Lincoln, b. 8, 1865. 

3. Mary, b. 7, 1867. M: — Clarence Moore, of Christiana, Lan. Co., 

Pa. Res. West Chester, Pa. (1906). 

4. Joseph, b. 10, 1869. 

5. Minuette, b. 3, 1S72. M:— Elwood Pusey. 

6. Benjamin, b. 9, 1S75. M: — Nellie Whiteside. Res. Christiana, 
Pa. 
B 1. C 4. D 8. E 2-1. Samuel A. Coates (Richard, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Mary Reynolds, of Cecil Co., Md. Their 
children: 

F. [. Roland. 
2. George. 
B 1. C 4. D 3. E 2-2. Sarah Jane Coates. (Richard, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M:— Matthew Day, b. 8, 9, 1818; d. 
11, 7, 1892. Resided in York Co., Pa. Res. Delta, York Co., 
Pa. (1906). Their children:— 

F. 1. Minervia Eugenie, b. 8, 21, 1857. UNM. 

2. Emily C, b. 1, 22, 1S59. M: — George Daughton. 

3. Nathan A., b. 11, 12, 1S62. M:— Carrie Metzel. 

4. Anna P., b. 6, 21, 1864. M: — First, Joseph Orr, who was killed 

in a slate quarry; then married Ben. Gass. 



58 Gencaology of the Coates Family. 

5. Laurence J., b. 5, 21, 1S66. M: — Katie Metzel. 

6. Truman C, b. 12, 12, 186S. M: — Emma Withrow. 

7. Phebe M., b, 7, 11, 1S72. M:— John T. Fredd. 

S. Amanda M., b. 4, 22, 1S77, M: — Samuel Kinsler. 

B 1. C 4. D 3. E2-3. Hannah Susanna Coates. (Richard, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — John Hunsberger, of Bucks Co., 
Pa. He died 12, 1S99. Their children: 

F. 1. Oscar. 

2. Zell Cordelia. M: — Payn Strawbridge. Is a widow. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 1. Abigail Coates. (Samuel, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M:— Ellis Coates (see B 1. C 4. D 1. El). 
Abigail Coates died at the home of son-in-law, George S. Lam- 
borii in Druemoore Township, Lan. Co., Pa., and int. in Drue- 
nioore F.B.G. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 3. Anna Coates (Samuel, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M:— Thomas Moore, 2, 13, 1839, of Bald Eagle 
Valley, Center Co., Pa. Settled in Drumoore Township, Lan. 
Co., Pa., on a farm, where Anna died. Thomas died in Millers- 
ville, Pa., at home of dau., Matilda, in 1882. Children: 

F. 1. Elmira, b. 6, 26, 1844; d. 7, 4, 1896, at Langhorn, Bucks Co., Pa. 

2. Cornelia, b. 4, 28, 1846; d. in a Hospital, in Jacksonville, Florida. 

3. Alonza, b. 3, 7, 1S50; d. 9, 4, 1S52. 

4. Flora, b. 4, 24, 1S54; d. in a Hospital in Philadelphia, the results 

of a burn. Res. Philadelphia, Pa. M. Henry Cloud, 2, iS, 1S75. 

Thomas Moore was a widower with children when he married 

Anna Coates. 

B 1. C 4. E 4. Esther Coates, M.D. (Samuel, Samuel, 

Thomas, Moses) M: — Abram G. Wileman, of Marlboro, Ohio. 

Their children: 

F. 1. Flora, died young. 

2. Erasmus Darwin, b. 1,3, 1854. 

Esther (Coates) Wileman studied medicine and practiced in 

various places, and traveled much. Went to Florida to spend a 

winter, where she died and was buried in Druemoore F.B.G., 

Lan. Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 5. Chekrington Coates (Samuel, Samuel, 

Thomas, Moses) M: — 10, 10, 1844, in city of Lancaster, Pa., by 

Friends Ceremony, in presence of Mayor, Sarah Ann Knight, 

dan. of Moses and Rhoda, b. 3, 27, 1822. 



GencaoJogy of the Coates Family. 59 

From Fallowfleld M. M. Records: 

3, 7, 1835. Womeus Meeting produced an essay of a certifi- 
cate for Sarah Ann Knight (a minor) to Biberry M. M., which 
was read, approved and signed. Children: 

F. i. Virginia Augusta, b. 8, 23, '45, in Chester Co., Pa. M. David 
W. Downey, u, 26, '67. Child: G. 1. Clarence. Res., Mon- 
roe Co., Iowa. 

2. Phillip Malancthon, b. 11, 29, '46, in Chester Co., Pa. M. Har- 

riet E. Walmsley, 12, 6, '71. Res., Lagrange, 111. Is clerk in 
Chicago, 111. Post Office. 

3. Caroline, b. 4, 5, '49; d. 8, 12, '50, in Chester Co., Pa. Int. Home- 

ville F. B. G. 

4. Mary Emma, b. 10, 26, '50, in Chester Co., Pa. 

5. Anna Cora, b. 1, 26, '54, in Cincinnati, O. M. Geo. G. McCosh, 

4, 14, '75. Children* G. 1. Nettie H., 2. Harry T., 
George G., was killed in 1S92, and Cora died, 1895. 

6. Henry W. B., b. 11, 10, '59, in Monmouth, 111. 

7. Margaret, b. 6, 7, '6o, in Monmouth, 111. 

8. Ernest R., b. 3. 7, '65; d. in Memphis, Tenn., 9, 15, '89. 

Cherrington and wife had their certificates transferred to Clea 
Creek M. Mtg. of Friends, 111., 4, i, 1S56. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 7. Mary Coates. (Samuel, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Alban, son of Jesse and Mary (Stubbs) 
Cutler. The latter were married 10, 4, 1817, and Alban and 
Mary were married 12, 15, 1846, becoming acquainted, and com- 
pany at wedding of Warrick Coates and Ruthanna Cook, 3, 24, 
1842. Children: 

F. 1. Theodore Parker, b. 10, 10, '47; d. 6, 8, '50. 

2. Horace Greeley, b. 25, 6, '53. d. 

3. Cassandra Southwick, b. 8, 20, '55. 

4. Mary Ella. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 8. Sarah Coates. (Samuel, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Daniel Smith Harris, a Captain of a Miss- 
issippi River Steamboat, on which she met him while enroute 
from St. Louis to St Paul, Mill., where she was going to deliver 
a course of lectures on Anatomiy, Physiology and Hygiene. 
Their marriage soon followed. Capt. Harris was a widower, 
with children when he and Sarah were married. She was a 



60 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Graduate in Medicine of the Homeopathic School. Died in 
Galena, 111. Their children: 

F. i. Wenona. 2. Ernistine. 3. Irene. 4. Scribe. 5. Anna. M. Dr. 

Hugh J. Jencks, of Galena, 111. He died. Anna's address, 

1357 Monadnock Block, Chicago, 111. 6. Paul Cherrington, b. 

8, 1869; d. 2 10, 1905, in Cal. M. Nellie, no issue. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 1. Sarah Jane Coates, (George, Samuel, 

Thomas, Moses) M: — William Webb, of Downington, Chester 

Co., Pa. Their children: 

F. 1. Henry Clay, b. 8, 18, 1844. 2. Anna. 3. Margaret. 4. George 
Thomas, b. 7, 15, 1849. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 2. Margaret Coates. (George, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Nathan Pyle, of York Co., Pa., in Phila., 
Pa., at "Black Bear" Hotel, 12, 4, 1851. Margaret died 1, 27, 
1891. Nathan died 2, 16, 1881. Their children: 

F. 1. Nathan Irvin, b. 9, 28, 1852. 

2. Joseph H, b. 6, 6, 1855; d. 2, 22, i860. 

3. Phebe Jane, b. 12, 22, 1857. 

4. Edward Everett, b. 3, 21, i860. 

5. Mary M., b. 6. 1, 1862. 

6. M. Alice, b. 5. 17, 1865. 

7. Hannah G., b. 3, 30, 1867. 

B 1. C 4. D 4, E 5. Joseph Rubincan Coates. (George, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — First wife, Ruthanna Richards, 
dau. of Isaac and Mary Ann (Reynolds), born 2, 14, 1843, died 
after a lingering illnes, 4, 1896. Married 1, 8, 1867. They 
settled on a farm in York Co., Pa., but in 1874 removed to a 
small farm on Octoraro Creek, at Porter's Bridge (now Richards- 
mere), Cecil Co., Md, where Ruthanna died. In 1898 Joseph 
married Ellen Fox, dau. of George and Sarah A., of Shepperds- 
ton, West Va. No children from either union. 

On 3, 26, 1902, Joseph died of pneumonia, at his farm at 
Richardsmere. He was a farmer all his life and a fervent helper 
in arranging for the Coates Reunion in Oxford Park, 9, 6, 1900. 

B 1 C 4. D 7. E 1. Anna Walker. (Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, 
Moses) M:— William P. Cooper, farmer, b. 1, 5, 1815; d. 7, 14, 
1872. in Vineland, N. J. Their children: 






Geneaology of the Coates Family. 61 

F. i. Asahel W„ b. 3, 28, 1839. 

2. Jeremiah R. 

3. William, b. 3, 1, 1S46. 

4. Sarah Alice. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 2. Susanna Walker. (Sarah, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Moses Pownall, who died 12, 1859. Their 
child: 

F. 1. Joseph Diskinson Coates. 

Moses Pownall died when Susanna married Pusey Barnard of 
"Bell Bank," Upper Oxford, Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 3. Phkbe Walker. (Sarah, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — William P. Cooper, as second wife (Anna 
Walker — sisters — being his first wife). Their children: 

F. 1. Samuel Lewis, b. 6, 26, 1849. UNM. 

2. Joseph Ellis, b. 1, 20, 1856. 

3. Mary Leah, b. 8, 20, 1860. 

4. Lorena, b. 4, 10, 1864; d 8, 25, 1895 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 4, Sarah Walker. (Sarah, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Sylvester Linvill, tanner and farmer, died 
5, 1886, on his farm near Chathan, Chester, Co., Pa. Their 
children: 

F. 1. Asahel Walker, died in Florida. 

2. Aquilla, Coal dealer in Phila., Pa. 

3. Anna. 

4. Lucy, died young. 

5. Clement H., b. 1, 20, 1858. M. Anna B. McElhaney, 8, 13, 1904, 

she b. 8, 28, '58. Res., 6432 Winslow St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

6. Arthur, died young. 

7. Margaret. 

8. Laura, died young. 

Sarah died at her home on farm near Chatham, Chester Co., 
Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 5. Samuel Walker. (Sarah, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Sarah T. Haines. Samuel died at his 
home near Chistiana, Lancaster Co., Pa. Children: 

F. 1. Anna Sarah, died young. 

2. Joseph H., is a farmer. 

3. Margaretta E. M. Rev. Lacy M. Simmons. 

4. Samuel Ellsworth. M. Martha Sauble. 

5. Mary Deborah. M. Willis Kent. Children: G. 1, Willis H. 



62 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

2. Sarah M. 3. Janette. 4. Raymond. 5. Mahlon. 

6. Asahel C, Jr. M. Helen Bruner. Children: G. 1. John E. 

2. Sarah H. 

7. L. Haines. M. Mary Kent. Children: G. r. Ruthanna. 2. 

Haines K. 

8. Susan Phebe. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 7. Joseph Coates Walker. (Sarah, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Lucy Heister Ellmaker, daughter 
of Esaius Enfield and Sarah Watson Ellmaker, 3, 13, 1856. 
Their children: 

F. 1. E. Enfield, b. 3, 3, 1S59. M. Nancy, dau. of Stawart and Mar- 
garet McCullough, 6, 26, 1894. Their children: G. 1. Joseph 
C, b. 1897. 2. Margaret Wellock, b. 1901. 3. Stewart Mc, 
b. 1903. 

2. Sarah Watson, b. 3, 4, 1861; d. 3, 29, 1905. 

3. Susan Pusey, b. n, 2, 1862. 

4. Joseph C. Jr., b. 10, 30, 1S65; d. 1, 2, 1878. 

5. William Latta, b. 3, 4, 1879. 

Jos. C. Walker promoted the Gap National Bank in 1883. He 
has been its President continually since. It has declared 5% 
dividends since its incorporation and now has a surpluss of over 
$50,000, an amount equaling its capital. His oldest son being 
its Vice President and Treasurer, and youngest son Secretary. 
Joseph is also President of the Jos. C. Walker & Sons Co., "In- 
corporated," a business that has grown from fifty years experience 
and the largest and oldest on the line of P.R.R., in the lines of 
grain, coal, etc. 

B 1. B 4. D 7. E 8. Mary Auce Walker. (Sarah Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Alfred Ellmaker, Pres. Spider Lake Tube 
Co., Wisconsin. Their children: 

F. 1. Edgar B. 2. Mary A. M. Edward C. Wallace; no children. 

3. Flora. 4. Nathaniel. 5. Sarah. 6. Alfred, Jr, M. Mary 
E. Hess. Child' G. 1. Emmett L. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E. 9. Margatktta Walker (Sarah, Samuel 
Thomas, Moses) M: — J. Francis Pennock, son of Joseph and Mary. 
Res. 235 N. 18th St., Phila. Children: 

F. 1. Joseph Darlington, b. 5, 6, 1870. M. Clara Snider, of Phila. 
No children. Res., Philadelphia. 
2. Walker Coates, b. 10, 22, 1880. Graduated in dentistry 1905. 
Office 239 N. 18th St., Phila., Pa. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family, 63 

B 1. C 4. D 8. E 1. Elizabeth Coates (Joseph, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M:— Gerard T. Hopkins, of Bait., Md., b. 10, 
10, 1816. Married 11, 25, 1846. Their children: 

F. i. Francis Nevil, b. 2, 3, 184S; d. 2, 16, 1879. Married 2, 7, 1872 to 

Frances A. Monroe. Their children: G. 1. Nevin Monroe, 
b. 9, 15. 1873. M. Katharine Guy. Their children: H. 1. 
Annie K. 2. Francis Guy. 2. Alfred F. M. 11, 5, 1905 
to Ann Wolfe Gibson. 

2. Anna R., b.9, 12, iS5o;d. 7, 13, iSSS. M. 11, 25, iS73, Evan Paul* 

No issue. 

3. Elizabeth Jones, b. 7, 14, 1S53. Res. iS E. Preston St., Bait, Md. 

4. John H. b. 3, 17, 1859. M. 12, 30, 1SS5, Mary R. Gill. Children: 

G. 1. Johns H., 5, 5, 1S93. 2 - William G., b. 11, 7, 1895. 

5. Gerard T., b. 12, 24, 1861. Res., Baltimore. Md. 

6. Roger Brook, b. 2, 2, 1S64. Res. Bait., Md. 

Next is Generation G, children of F, 
B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. F 1. Sarah Walker Coates. (Ellis, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — George L,. Lamborn, by- 
Friends Ceremony, 5, 8, 1856, son of Smedley and Margaret 
Lamborn, b. 11, 24, 1837. Their children: 

G. 1. Margaret C., b. 4, 6, 1S57; d. 7, 19, 1S72. 

2. Mary M. 3 b. 10, 23. iS^S; d. 6, 28, 1S62. 

3. Priscilla, b. 4, 27, 1S60. 

4. John Comley, b. 4, 18, 1863; d. 7, 24, 1866. 

5. Anna Alary, b. 1, 24, 1865; d. n, 25, 1SS2. 

6. Charles Linnaeus, b. 5, 2, 1S67. 

7. Lucretia Mott, b. 5, 15, 1870. 

George and Sarah live on their farm in Druemoore Township, 
Lan. Co., Pa., and all their deceased children are int. in Drue- 
moore F.B.G. P. O., Bon View, Lancaster Co., Pa. R.F.D. 

B 1. C 4. D L. E 1. F 2. Margaret Coates. (Ellis, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Chalkley Webster, son of 
Jesse and Elizabeth, (Lukins) Bart Township, Iran. Co., Pa., 3, 
22, 1855, Res. Collamer, Chester, Co., Pa. Their children: 

G, 1. Evaline, b. 6, 15, 1S56. 

2. Joseph, b. 12, 15, 1857. 

3. Jesse Ellis, b. 11, 30, '59. M. Annie, dau. of Jos. H. and Mary 

Brusius. Children: H. 1. Lillian. 2. Idella. Res., Harvey. 
Illinois. 

4. Medora, b. 1,7, '62, 



64 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

5. William, b. 9, 17, '63. M. Anna Sharpless. 4, 19, 1888. Chip 

dren. H. 1. Sharpless. 2. Raymond. Res, Russelville, Pa' 

6. George, b. 12, 14, '64. M. May Chambers, 11, 8, 93. Res* 

Christiana, Pa. Child: H. 1. Lillian. 

7. Linford, b. 12, 26, '66. M. Estella Eastburn, of Del. Children: 

H. 1. Marion. 2. Joseph. Res., Collamer, Pa. 
S. Lillian, b. 1, 27, '73. 
9. Viola, b. 10, 15, '76. 
B1.C4.D1. F4. Samuel Coates (Ellis, Warrick, Samuel, 
Thomas, Moses) M: — Clarissa, dan. of John and Mary Romans, 
11, 28, '62 Clarissa was b. at Romansville, Chester Co., Pa., 6, 4, 
'42, and died at their home on farm near Homeville, Pa., 12, 
6, '65. Their children: 

G. 1. Mary Eva, b. S, 4, '63. M. Horace King, 3, 15, 88. Children: 
H. 1. Nina. 2. Hazel. Res., Christiana, Pa, 

2. Louella M., b. 9, 9, '64. M, Dennison Shivery, 12, 16, '84. Chil- 

dren: H. 1. Norwood. 2. Delmar. Res., Collamer, Pa. 

3. A son, died in infancy. Int. at Homeville F.B.G. 

Samuel married a second wife; 9, 3, '68, Lydia Ann Gill, dau. 

of Robinson and Lydia, of Upper Oxford Twpt,, Chester Co., 

Pa. Their children: 

2-1. Charles T. b. 12, 21, '69. M. Mary E. Kreider, 12, 24, '89 

Children: H. 1. Lydia M. 2. Mina. P. O. Cochranville, Pa 

2-2. William, b. 11, 19, '70 M. Charlotte Jebb, 9, 28, '95. Children: 

H. 1. Jennie Elva. Res., Cochranville, Pa. 
2-3. Norman, b. 5, 16, '75. M. Charlotte Fry, 5. 14, '98. Children: 
H. 1. Gladys R. 2. Leroy. 3. Helen M., P. O., Cochranville, Pa 
2-4. Anna L., b. 5, 16, '77. 
2-5. Parker, b. 7, 24, '79- M- Lillian Lamborn. Child: H. 1. 

Ethel B. 
2-6. Emma W., b. 8, 15, 'Si. M. Benj. Prang. Children: H. 1. 

Mabel, 2. Leary. 
2-7. Lafayette, b. 7, 28, ^:,. 
2-8. Esther, b. S, 6, '86. M. Shivery, 1905. 

Lydia (Gill) Coates was bom near Cochranville, Chester Co. 
Pa., 1, 14, '48. Samuel was a soldier in the Civil War. in the 
124th Pa. Volunteers, Infantry under Captain James B. Whit- 
craft, and Col. Jos. W. Hawley, Co. C, Nine Months men. 
Mustered into service 8, 11, 1862 and mustered out 5, 17, 1863. 
Saw much hard service in the Army of the Potomac. Battle of 
Antietam being the most severe. Res., on farm. P. O., Coch- 
ranville, Chester Co., Pa. R.F.D. No. 1. 



Genealogy of the Coafes Family, 65 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. F 6. Lewis Coates, (Ellis, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Gertrude Strickland, of Chester 
Co., Pa. Their children: 

G. i. Lewis, b. i, 12, '66; d. 1, 28, '66. Int. Homeville F.B.G, 

2. Elsie May, b. 2, 15, '67; d. 7, iS, '71. Int. as above. 

3. Harry Orville, b. 12, 22, '69. M. Elizabeth Wickersham, 12, 31, 
dau. of John and Catharine, of Russelville, Pa. 

4. Mary M., b. 11, 8, '71. M. S. Irving Husted, of Rochester, N. 

Y., where they reside. Children: H. 1. Elya May, b. 11, '33. 
2. Ruth Coates, b. 1900. 3. Harold I., b. '03. 4. Louis C, b, 
1 1, '04. 
5. Jesse, b. 2. Lewis now (1906) res., Burke P.O., Va. 
B 1. C. 4. D 1. E 3. D 3. Edith Coates. (Hartt, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Davis Keech, of Lower Oxford 
Twpt., Chester Co., Pa. Their children: 

G. 1. Elizabeth, b. 2, 23, '75. M. Gailen P. Boyce, 9, 14, '98. Chil- 
dren: B. 1. MelvinC. 2. Edith A. 

2. Jacob, b. 11, 26, '79. 

3. Rebecca, b. 5, 17, 'S2. Nottingham, Pa., R.F.D. 1. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 3. F 4. George Darlington Coates 
(Hartt, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Philena, dau. 
of Henry and Eliza Reynolds, b. 8, 11, 1840. They were mar- 
ried 10, 26, 1875, and reside on their farm in Lower Oxford 
Township, Chester Co., Pa., where Philena died 2, 8, 1892. No 
children. Res., Nothingham, Pa., R.F.D., 1, 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E3. F6. Howard Coates. (Hartt, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Alice Sutton, of Virginia. Their 
children: 

G. 1. Phebe Lockwood, b. 2, 25, 1S72. Trained nurse, (1905). 
2, Hartt Grandum. 3. Charles Sutton. Twins, b. 7, 17,1982. 

4. George D., Jr., b. 2, 29, 1SS4; d. at 7 days old. 

5. Joseph, b. 7, 20, 1885. 

6. Howard Bennett, b. 4. 13, 1S91. I\ O. Nottingham, Pa., R. F. 
D., 2. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 3. F 7. Stephen Coates (Hartt, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses") M: — Lydia J. Pugh, dau. of Amos 
and Mary A (Bye) of East Nottingham Township, Chester Co., 
Pa. by Friends Ceremony, 9, 19, 1876. L. J. C, b. 2, 15, 1856. 
Children: 



66 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

G. i. Aimee P., b. S, 22, 1S77. 

2. Edna D., b. 12, 11, 1S00. 

3. Granville, b. S, 2Q, 1SS3. 

4. George D., Jr., b. 7, 8, 18S7. P.O., Nothinsham, Pa., R.F.D. 1. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 5. F 1. Susanna Coaxes. (Warrick, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — William Neal Wood, son of 
Joshua and Eliza (Hall) . Farmer in Lan. Co., Pa., near Octo- 
raro, Coleraine Township. Married 1, 29, 1862, in Philadelphia 
at the home of William Calver. Their children: 

G. 1. Annetta, b. 11, 1, 1S63; d. 10, 16, 1S65. 

2. Annie C, b. 8, 14, 1866. 

3. Alberta, b. 1, 1872. 

William and Susanna (Coates) Wood first settled 011 a farm 
in Lan. Co., Pa., belonging to his father, near "Andrews Bridge, 1 ' 
afterward to a farm near New London, Chester Co., Pa., which 
he bought, and afterward bought a farm in Upper Oxford Town- 
ship,Chester Co., Pa., near his father-in-law, and resided on it un- 
til he moved to another farm in same township known as "Edon- 
ton," formerly a hotel property, now (1906) owned by their son- 
in-law, Samuel P. Martin. From this farm they moved to 
Russelville, where William died on 4, 6, 1S98. Int. in Home- 
ville F.B.G. 

B 1. C. 4. D 1. E5. F2. Pusey Coates (Warrick, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Adaline, dau. of William and 
Lydia (Pennock) Brosius, of Lan. Co., Pa. William B. was a 
minister of note in the Society of Friends and a member at Home- 
ville Meeting. Married by Friends Cermony at the home of her 
parents in Coleraine Township, 12, 14, 1871, under the care of 
Penns Grove M. M. They settled on a farm in Upper Oxford 
Township, Chester Co., Pa., the following Spring, where they 
have since remained, (1906). Their children: 

G. 1. Evaline Lydia, b. 6, 4, 1873. 

2. William Brosius, b. 7, 4, 1874. 

3. Alice Ruthanna, b. 7, 4, 1879, a trained nurse. 

4. Mary, b. 3, 18S3; d. 4, 1883. 

5. Anna, b. 5, 6, 1S84. P. O., Cochranville, Chester Co., Pa., 

R. F. D. No. 2. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 5. F 3. Truman Coates, M.D., (Warrick; 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Sarah Boone Thomas, 




Sarah B. Coates 



Truman Coates, M.D. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 67 

dau. of Jacob and Rebecca John (Lee), of Salem, Ohio, 10, 26. 
1882, at the home of the bride. After they resided with his 
parents in Russelville, Chester Co., Pa., for four years they 
went to Clevaland, Ohio, where he entered the Medical Depart- 
ment of Wooster University, and graduated 7, 26, 1888, following 
his profession in office practice in Russelville for seven years, 
during this time he had Post Graduate Courses in Philadelphia 
Polyclinic Hospital and Post Graduate College for Physicians. 
In Spring of 1896 located in Oxford, same County, where success 
followed his efforts in the calling of the Specialities of Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Throat affections. In Spring of 1869 Doctor Coates 
had measles, and from working in plowed ground too soon there- 
after he contracted cold, which settled in his spine, which, in 
after years developed spinal paralysis, from which he was com- 
pelled to use a wheel-chair thereafter, from the Summer of 1878. 
Compiler of this work. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. F 1. Elenor Darlington (Susanna, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M; — Charles, son of David 
and Sarah Walton, 4, 2, 1863. Their child: 

G, I. Clara Walton, b. 2, n, 1865. M. Frank Hannum, 2, 24, 1SS6. 
Their children: H. 1. Bertha, b. 9, S 1S87. 2. Earl, b. 6 V 29, 
1S94. 3. Mary, b. 11, 24, 1S96. P. O., of both above, Parker- 
ville, Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. F 3. Sarah Maria Darlington 
(Susanna, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Ellis P., son 
of Thomas and Lydia Speakman, 3, 22, 1S71. No children. P. 
O., Kennett Square, Pa., R.F.D. No. 2. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. F 5. Susanna R. Darlington (Sus- 
anna, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Samuel P., son of 
J. Pennell and Esther P. Hannum, 11, 1, 1865. Their children: 

G. 1. Elsie, b. S, 23, 1866. 

2. Georgetta, b. 2, 1, 1S71. 

3. D.Frederick, b. 7, 26, 1874. P.O., Kennett Square,Pa.,R.F.D.No.3 

Elsie Hannum married William E. Hickman. Their children: 
H. 1. Pennell, b. 7, 12, 1S91. 2. Ethel, b. 4, 9, 1S96. 3. Grace 
b. 9, 22, 1900. Myrtle, b. 4, 15. 1903. 

D. Frederick, married Christine MacCallum, 12, 24, 1900. No 
children. Christine died 8, 1901. 



68 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. F 6. Mary Jane Darlington (Susanna, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — John J., son of Ebenezer 
and Maria Speakman. No children. P. O., West Chester, Pa., 
R.F.D., No. 11. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 6. F 7. Gejorgk W. Darlington (Susanna, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Eliza, dau. of Ebenezer 
and Maria Speakman, 3, 8, 1877. Their children: 

G. i. Emma V., b. n, 26, 1877; d 2, 22, 1SS1; int. in Burmingham F.B.G. 

2. Susan M., b. 12, 2, 1S78; d. 11, 17, 1895; i nt - m Burmingham F.B.G. 

3. G. Barclay, b. 2, 25, 1880. 

4. Ellis P., b. 6, 9, 1SS1. 

5. J. Howard, b. 10, 16, 1SS2. 

6. Helen, b. 6, 14, 1884. 

7. E. Pierce, b. 12. 17, 1885. P. O., West Chester, Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 7. F 1. Lydia Wood (Sarah, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas. Moses) M: — Jesse Hood, son of Moses and 
Margaret Ann (Hallowell) Brinton, 1, 22, 1865, by Friends 
Ceremony at home of bride's parents, on farm "Mount Airy," 
near Steelville, Chester Co., Pa., under care of Penns Grove M. 
M. Res., (1906) West Grove, Pa. Their children: 

G. 1. Sarah Laura, b. 1, 5, 1870. M. Leslie Barnes. Have 4 sons. 

2. Charles Marion, b. 6, 12, 1872 or 1873. M. Edith Williams, of 

Vineland, N. J., 1904. Res., Atlantic City, N J. (1905). 

3. Almatenia Cresilda, b. 12, 21, 1875. 

4. Estella, b. 6, 16, 1878. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 7. F 3. Ellis Pusey Wood (Sarah, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M:— P.ebecca W. Martin, b. 12, 2, 
'48, dau. of Thos. and Hannah, of near Coatesville, Pa., on 
turnpike, at formerly "Rain Bow" hotel property, by Friends 
Ceremony. Res. and P. O., Doe Rum Chester Co., Pa. A re- 
tired fanner. Their children: 

G. 1, Walter T., b. 11, 25, '72, at "Half Way House," hotel Property. 
M. Mary B. Pusey, 10, 17, 1900, by Friends Ceremony. Their 
child: H. 1. Edith Pusey, b. 3, 4, '04. Farmer on his father's 
farm, Doe Run, Pa. 
2. Mary E., b. 12, 17, '76. M. Saml. Pusey, 12, 27, 1900, by Friends 
Ceremony. Their child: H. 1. Rebecca Marion, b. 4, 19, '02. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 7. F 4. Phixkna Coates Wood (Sarah, 



Gencaolcgy of the Coatcs Family. 69 

Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — David W., sou of David 
and Elizabeth Jackson, who emmigrated from Ireland in 1828, 
and resided in New Garden Township, Chester Co., Pa. David 
and Philena were married by Friends Ceremony at home of 
bride's parents, near Doe Run, Pa., 2, IS, 1875, and moved to 
their farm iu Bart Township, Lan. Co., Pa., where they yet re- 
side (1906). P. O., Bartville, Pa. Children: 

G. I. Lindley D., b. 3, 2, '76. Runs his father's mill on farm. 

2. Elizabeth Westfield, b. 9, 10, '8i. Was a graduate at Swarth- 
more Friend College, class of 1903. A leader (1906). 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 7. F 6. Morris Thomas Wood (Sarah, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Margaret, B., dau. of 
William T., and Mary Weldon, 12, 23, 1S80 by Pres. Minister 
at Ercildoun, Chester Co., Pa. Their children: 
G. 1. Leila Mary, b. 7, 20, '82. Is a teacher (1906). 

2. Elizabeth Hodson, b. 2, 6, '84. Both of the above attended 
Women's College, Bait., Md. M. T. W., is a farmer and dairy- 
man. P. O., Doe Run, Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 8. F 2. Mary J. Koopks (Abigail, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Agustus Brosius, son of 
Henry and Rachel (Moore) b. 12, 7, 1840. Married 2, 12, '74, 
at home of bride's parents, on farm near Chatham, Chester Co., 
Pa. Agustus succeeded Mahlon B. Kent, as Indian Agent at 
the Great Nemaha Agency, at White Cloud, Kansas, for two 
years, where he and family resided. Appointed by Philadelphia 
Yearly Meeting of Friends. Res., Avondale, Chester Co., Pa. 
(1905). Their children: 

G. 1. Florence, b. 2, 28, '75, in New Castle, Del. M. J. Thomas 

Baker, son of Geo. L. 3, 6 t '02. Child: H. 1. Mary Amy, b 

2, 4, '03. 

2. Bertha, b. I, 8, '80, in Kennett Twpt, Pa.; d. 3, 4, 'Si. 

3. Arthur, b. 4, 7, '82, at White Cloud, Kan. 

4. Mary, b. 7, 24, '84, in Oxford, Pa.; d. 8, 4, '84. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 8. F 3. Morton Hoopes. (Abigail, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Laura Hoopes, dau. of 
Cyrus Hoopes, of Doe Run, Pa., b. 12, 3, 1849, and d. 5, 1, 
1896, iu Avondale, la. Their children: 



70 Gencaology of the Coates Family. 

G. i. Ida L., b. 9, 28, 1877. M. Henry Crandall, Russelville, Pa. 
No children. He died about 1901 or 2. 

2. Henry M., b. 9, 7, 1S79. 

3. George B., b. 10, 5, 1882. 

4. Nina D., b. 8, 16, 1886. 

5. Francis Pratt, b. 3, 9, 1889. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 8. F 4. Henry Hoopks (Abigail, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Rebecca R. dau. of William B. 
and Mary C. Waters, 12, 28, 1880. Their children: 

G. 1. Linda M., b. 11,12, 1883. Graduate of W. C. S. N. S., Pa., and 
Cushing Academy, Mass. 
2. Marion V., b. io, 12, 1886; d. 4, 17, 1888. 

Henry Hoopes died of consumption, when his widow married 
Evan T. Pennock, and lived on farm until Evan died, 5, 12, 1892. 
Rebecca rtsides in West Grove, Pa. (1905). 
B 1. C 4. D 1. E 8. F 5. Warrick Hoopks (Abigail, War- 
rick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Annie Dalton of Norris- 
town, Pa. Their children: 

G. 1. Francis P., b. 7, 12, 1890. 

2. John D., b. 9, 1, 1S91, 

3. Charles Percy, b. 12, 7, 1892. 

4. Mary, b. 10, 4, 1894. 

5. Pauline, b. 7, 24, 1896. 

6. Helen, b. 8, 18, 1898. 

7. Abbie Sarah, b. 9, 30, 1900. Resides on farm near West Chester, 

Penna. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 8. F 6. Sarah Scarlet Hoopks (Abigail, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Emil Taube, a musician. 
They built a Conservatory of Music, in Harrisburg, Pa., where 
Sarah died, 4, 21, 1899. Int. in F. B. G. at London Grove, 
Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 12. F 2. Eu,a Warrick Lynch (Philena, 
Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Harry C. Thomas, of 
Chester Co., Pa. Their child: 

G. 1. Philena L., b. 7, 17, 1886. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 12 F 3. Susan Lynch (Philena, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Henry Froyer, son of Henry and 
Catherine Froyer, of King of Prussia, Chester Co, Pa. Their 
children: 



Gen etiology of the Coates Family, 71 

G. i. James Robert, b. 9, 16, 1SQ3. 

2. Catharine Charlton, b. 8, 28, 1S96. 

Henry Froyer died of Typhoid Fever. Susan resides in West 
Chester, Pa. (1906). 
B 1. C 4. D 1. E 12. F 4. Laura Lynch (Philena, Warrick, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Henry Haines, son of George and 
Harriett, of West Chester, Pa., by Friends Ceremony, in Oxford, 
Pa., at home of bride's parents. He is a groceryman, in West 
Chester, Pa. (1905). Their children. 
G. 1. George D., b, 4, 26, 1903. 
2. Harriett, b. 1, 19, '06. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2. F 1. Mary Ann Gray (Hannah, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) UNM. Has a store at 625 Market St., 
Wilmington, Del. (1905). 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2. F 2. Enoch Gray (Hannah, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Ella Boone. Their children: 

G. 1. Charles B., b. 4, 28, 1S62. Married, and resides in Highland, 
Del., (1902). 

2. Lincoln Truman, b. 10, 23, 1S64; d. 10, 19, 1S66. 

3. Louisa S., b. 3, 30, 1867. M. 9, 30, 1891, DeForest L., son of 

Col. Amos W. and E. Jennie (Rank) Backman. DeForest L, 
b. 5, 29, 1869. He was assistant manager in the jewelry dept., 
in Wanamaker's, Phila., (1900). Res., 4216 Ogden St., Phila. 

4. Elsie, b. 2, 28, 1S7S. Res., 4217 Ogden St., Phila. 

Enoch Gray died of consumption at residence of Chalkley 
Webster, near Collamer. P. O., Chester Co., Pa. and int. in 
Phila.. Pa. Was a soldier in the Civil War. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2. F 3. Lucretia Gray (Hannah, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Francis Hickman, D.D.S. Their 
children: 

G. 1. Walter B., b. n, 28, 1S62; d. 5, 15, 1S70. 

2. Carrol G., b. 9, 30, 1S64; d. 6, 12, 1865. 

3. Mary B., b. 5, 28, 1866. Res., Bound Brook, N.J. (1900). 

B 1. C 4. D 2. C 3. F 1. James Truman Barnard (Phebe, 
Levi, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Dorothea Davis, dau. of 
William and Catherine, dau. of Joseph and Susan Hill Engle, 
(see B 3. C 1. D 1.) of "Bell Bank/' Lancaster Co., Pa. Res., 
Christiana, Pa. (1905). Their children: 



72 Gencaology of the Coates Family. 

G. i. Oriana Phebe, b. 7, 16, 1S62; d. g, io, 1864, int. in Homeville F.B.G. 

2. Rebecca, b. 10, 30, 1863; died at one day old. 

3. Mary T., b. 10, 16, 1865. 

4. Pusey, b. 6, 6, 1868; d. 1, 26, 1870, int. in Homeville F.B.G. 

5. William Davis, b. 10, 9, 1869. Was electrician. Died 10, 1905. 

6. Henry Walter, b. 7, 27, 1869. M. Ella S., dau. of Calvin 

Cooper, of Bird in Hand, Pa. Res., on his father's farm, in 
Upper Oxford Township, Chester Co , Pa. (1905). Their chil- 
dren: H. 1. Milton Everett, b. 9, 1902. 2. Dorthea, b. 4, 1904. 

7. Everett Pusey, M.D., b. 3, 1,1875. Was graduated in medicine in 

University of Pennsylvania, Class of 1900. Practicing in 
Phila., Pa. (in 1906) South Broad St. 

Jas. T., wife and daughter Mary, reside in Christiana, Lan. 
Co., Pa., 1906. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2. F 2. Louisa Barnard (Phebe, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Brinton Walter, coal, grain and 
lumber merchant in Christiana, Lan. Co., Pa. No children. 
Louisa died, when Brinton married, in turn two of William 
Davis' daughters. 

C 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-6. F 1. Lkora Coates. (James, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Harry P., son of Warrick Cooper, 
of Bart, Lan. Co., Pa. P.O., Strawsburg, Lan. Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-6. F 1. Lora Jackson, M.D. (Ellen, 
Smith, Levi, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — William Waldo 
Blackman, M.D., of Brooklyn, N.Y., b. 5. 25, 1856, son of 
William Wise and Sarah Waldo, of Waterville, N.Y. Res., 519 
Clinton Ave., Brooklyn, E. D., New York. Their children: 

G. 1. Kenneth, b. 1, 10, 18S8; d. 4, 13, 1S8S. 

2. Elinor, b. 3, 23, 1892. 

3. William Jackson, b. 5, 25, 1S93. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-7. F 3. Mary Coates (George, Levi, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Clarence Moore, of Christiana, 
Lan. Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 2. E 2-7. F 5. Minuette Coates (George, 
Levi, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Elwood, son of Franklin 
and Mary Pusey, of Upper Oxford Township, Chester Co., Pa. 
Res., West Grove, Pa. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family* 73 

G. 1-2. Twin boys, George Coates and Franklin Elwood, b. 12, 1905. 
B 1. C 4. D 4. E 3. F 1. Euviira Moore (Anna, Samuel, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Elwood Lamborn, 9, 13, 1866. 
Elwood died in 1878, int. in Druemoore Township, L,an. Co. , Pa. 
One child: 

G. 1. Edgar, b. 12, 25, 1S69; d. 5, 30, 1900, in Phila., Pa. Was a 

machinist at Baldwin's Locomotive Works in Phila. M. 

Laura I. Beaver, b. 4, 11, 1869. Their child: H. 1. Gertrude, 

b. in Phila., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 3. F 2. Cornelia Moore (Anna, Samuel, 

Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M:— Bird Landon, 11, 1880. One 

child: 

G. 1. Seaton. They removed to Florida and there Cornelia died in a 

hospital in Jacksonville, 1885. 
B 1. C 4. D 4. F 2. Erasmus Darwin Wileman (Esther, 
Samuel, Samuel, Thomas Moses) M: — Catharine H. Hatton, 
dau. of Owen and Joanna, b. 3, 19, 1851. Married by Rev. 
Charles G. Ames, a Unitarian minister, of Germantown, Pa., 
11, 23, 1876. Their children: 

G. 1. Owen Abram, b, 5, 1$, 187S, in Adelaide, Australia. Drowned 
in State of Delaware. 

2. Esther Joanna, b. 12, 21, 1SS0, in Adelaide, Australia; d. 4, 7, 

1904, in Detroit, Mich., of consumption. 

3. Florence, b. 11, 26, 1883, in Allegheny, Pa. Res., in Toledo 

Ohio, (1903). 

4. Anna Mary, b. 2, 20, 1S85, in Pittsburg, Pa., d. 7, 11, 18S5, in 

Germantown, Pa. Int. at Fair Hill Cemetery, Phila, Pa. 
E. D. W. is employed by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
R. R., General Office in Cleveland, Ohio (1906), where he has 
been for years. He spent several years in Australia in Scientific 
pursuits. 
B 1. C 4. D 4. E 5. F 3. Mary Emma Coates (Cherrington, 
Samuel, Samuel, Thomas ; Moses) M: — 4, 27, 1872, Howard 
Nelson, son of Joel and Phebe Woodword, of Newark, Del. 
Res., Elbow, Powhatton Co., Va. (1905), Their children: 

G. 1. Blanche Cherrington, b. 8, 12, '73. M. Joseph N. Young, 1889, 
he died in 1891. Their child: H. 1. Ross, b. 1890. 

2. Ethel V., b. 7, 24, '75. 

3. Cora E., b. 23, '78. M. 10, 17, 1902, Walter C. Fogg, of Miami 

Florida. 



74 Geneaology of the Coaics Family. 

4. Pauline M„ b. 11, 11, '79. 

5. Willis C, b. 5, 18, 1881. 

6. Howard E., b. 8, 3, '83; d. 8, 1, '89. 

7. Fred V., b. 12, 17, '85. 

8. Harold J., b. 9} 3, '87. 

9. Helen K., b. 7, 29, '92. 
10. Phillip B., b. ii, 9, '96. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 7. F 2. Horace Greeley Cutler (Mary 
•Samuel, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Jennie Stewart, 12, 14, 
1876. Their children: 

G. 1. Joseph, b. 5, 7, 187^. M. Louella Deaver. Their children: H, 
1. Dorothy, b. 4, 1901. 2. Jennette, b. 4, 1903. 

2. Ernest, b. 8, 5, 1879. 

3. Helen, b. 11, 29, 1881. 

4. Ralph, b. 1, 24, 1884. 

5. Horace, b. 10, 12, 1886; d. 5, 7, 1890. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 7. F 3. Cassandra Southwick Cutler 
(Mary, Samuel, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Wilmer, sou of 
Jason and Anna Bolton, 1,1, 1879. Wilmer b. 6, 3, 1847. Their 
children: 

G. 1. Theodore C, b. 11, 21, 1882; d. 12, 11, 1902. Int. in Druemore 
F.B.G., Lan. Co., Pa. 

2. Leslie I., b. 6. 9, 1886. 

3. Edgar J., b. 10, 1, 1S88; d. 9, 20, 1S89, Int. in Druemore F.B.G. 

Wi'imer is a farmer and nurseryman in Druemore Township, 
Lancaster Co., Pa. P. O., Bon View. R.F.D. 1. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 7. F 3. Mary Ella Cutler (Mary, Samuel, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Charles L M son of Joseph and 
Emeline Shoemaker, 11, 20, 1884. Charles was born in 1856. 
P O., Goshen, Pa. Their children: 

G. 1. Alton C, b. 12, 16, 1885; d. 9, 22, 18S6. 

2. Mary Ethel, b. 12, 20, 1886. 

3. Emeline, b. 10, 24, 1889. 

4. Jesse A., b. 12, 26, 1890. 

5. Author J., b. 9, 10, 1893. 

6. Clifford, b. 11, 19, 1895. 

B1.C4.D4.E8.F1. Wenona Harris (Sarah, Samuel, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — John Valentine Helman, b. 10, 5, 
1848. " Res. Illinois. Children: 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 75 

G. i. Pauline S. Harris, b. io, 2$, 1873. M. Joseph Mulroney. Their 
children: H. 1. Pauline, b. 7,2, 1897. 2. Margaret, b. 1, 1, 1900. 

2. Irene Christine, b. 10, 6, 1875. 

3. Elenor, b. 2, 14, 1S87. 

B. 1. C 4. D 4. E 8. F 2. Ernestine; Harris (Sarah, 
Samuel, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Charles Franklin, b. 6, 
26, 1854. Their children: 

G. 1. Helen Esther, b. 6, 5, 1881. 

2. Arthur Norris, b. 10, 18, 18S3; d. 5, 13, 1889. 

3. Sarah Coates, b. 12, 1S85. 

Reside in Warren, III. 

B 1. C 4. D 4. E 8. F 3. Irkne Harris (Sarah, Samuel, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — John Andrew Gilleth, b. 4, 25, 
1856; d. 9, 24, 1899. Children: 

G. 1. Roy William, b. n, 1, 1SS0. 

2. Charles Liver more, b. 9, 14, 1893. 

3. Sarah Coates, b. 8, 23, 1886; d. 8, 29, 1S87. 

4. Bernice H., b. 10, 21, 18S9. 

Reside Galena, 111. (713 South Bench St.). 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 1. F 1. Hknry Clay Wkbb (Sarah Jane, 
George, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: Ruthanna Hall Eamborn, 
dau. of Thomas and Catharine, b. 7, 20, 1849. Their children: 

G. 1. Fred, b. 6, 18, 1S70. M. Laura C. White, in Phila., Pa. 

2. Sarah J., b. 2, 5, 1872. 

3. Ella Coates, b. 10, 25, 1873. M. Walter Windle, in Phila., Pa. 

4. Maud, b. 10, 19, 1879. 

5. Florence D., b. 2, 3, 1884; d. 12, 28, 1885. 

6. Joseph Coates, b. 7,26, 18SS. 

7. A daughter, 

Res., Unionville, Chester Co., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 1. F 2. Gkorgk Thomas Webb (Sarah 
Jane, George, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Sarah Almena, 
dau. of William and Elizabeth Rich, 9, 4, 1879, in West Chester, 
Pa., by Rev. Alfred Haines. Children: 

G. 1. Anna Elizabeth, b. 8, 22, 1880. M. Frank B. King, 9, 33, 1904, 
at home of bride. 

2. Comley Earl, b. 6, 26, '82; d. 8, 19, '82. Int. London Grove F.B.G. 

3. George Thomas, Jr., b. 7, 12, '83. M. Hannon Gerkler Ector, 

12, 28, '05, dau. of Thos. and Henrietta, of New Garden, Pa 

4. Sarah Almena, b. 7, 11. '86; d. 1, 30, '89. 



76 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 2. F 1. Nathan Irwin Pyle (Margaret, 
George, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Caroline, dau. of John 
and Casandra Neiper, of York Co., Pa., 8, 3, '75, in City of 
York, Pa., by a Lutheran Minister. Res., Pylesville, Harford 
Co., Md. Their children: 

G. i. Joseph J., b. 5. 13, '76. M. Ethel E., 8, 7, 'oi. Children: H. 
1. George. 2. Alfred. 

2. Carrie M., b. 7, 21, '78. M. Samuel J. Thompson. Children: 

H. 1. Samuel. 2. Ross G. 3. Carrie, b. 1905. 

3. David, b. 8, 13, '79- 

4. Howard, b. 3, 30, '86. 

5. Benjamin, b. 10, 15, '88. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 2. F 4. Edward Everett Pyle (Margaret, 
George, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Bertha Duphorn, of 
Harford Co., Md., 11, 2, 1902, in Belair, Md., at Pres. Parson- 
age. Their child: 

G. 1. Margaret F. b. 7, 9, '04. Res. Pylesville, Harford Co., Md, 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E2. F5. Mary M. Pyle (Margaret, George, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M:— Charles K. Caughey, of Bait., 
Md., 4, 8, '91, at Advent Mission Chapel, by Rev. Mr. Clicker. 
Their children: 

G. 1. Elizabeth K., b. 7, 27, '96. 

2. Chas. F.. b. 4, 24, '04. Res., 1522 Retreat St., Bait., Md. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 2. F 6. Martha Alice Pyle (Margaret, 
George, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — George B. Johnson, of 
South Orange, N.Y., 10, 15, 1902, by Rev. Hyde, of Slate Hill 
Pres. Church, of Delta, York Co., Pa. Res., Richards, Ind. 

B 1. C 4. D 6. E 2. F 7. Hannah G. Pyle (Margaret, George, 
Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — John R., son of Robt. N. Ramsey, 
of Harford Co., Md., 1, 3, 1887, at Pres. parsonage in West- 
minister, Carroll Co., Md., by the Rev. Mr. G. W. Cooper. 
Res., Rocks, Harford Co., Md. Their children: 

G. 1. Robert E., b. 10, 6, 1888. Graduate Belair High School 1905. 
2. Janie A., b. 5, 7, 1892. 3. Hazel G., b. 8, 12, '05. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 1. F4. Benjamin Frankun Trout (Sarah 
Alice, Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Myrtle . Their 

children: 

G. 1. Isabella, b. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 77 

D 1. C 4. D 7. E 1. F 8. Clara May Trout (Sarah Alice, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Edward Hirst. Their 
child: 

G. i. Earl. 

B1.C4.D7.E2.F1. Joskph Dickinson Coates Pown- 
all (Susanna, Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Mary- 
Haines Stubbs, 2, 1864, in Phila. Their children: 

G. i. Moses Wilmer, b. 3, 5, 1865. M. Phebe Thompson, 9, 16, 1890. 
Their children: H. 1. William Joseph, b. 5, 11, 1900. 2. 
Malcom, b. 8, 11, 1902. Res., in Coatsville, Pa. 

2. Vincent Stubbs, b. 8, 12, 1870. M. Bertha Walton, i2, 16, 1898. 

Their children: H. 1. Ruth Elizabeth, b. 12, 20, 1900. Res., 
in Coatesville, Pa. 

3. Mary Elizabeth, b. 2, 2, 1873. M - Edwin Clayton Walton, 

Res., Swarthmore, Pa. 

4. Susanna Edna, b. 6, 23, 1879. M. Albert L. Buffington, 6, 10, 

1903, son of Edwin and Hannah Buffington. Res., in Rising 
Sun, Md. Merchant. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 3. F 2. Joseph Ellis Cooper (Phebe, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Ada McDermit, 6, IS, 
1878. Their children: 

G. 1. Lurena May. 

2. Mabel A., b. 10, 24, 1882. 

3. Lucy Pearl. 

4. George A. Smith, b. 5, 25, 1892. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 3. F 3. Mary Leah Cooper (Phebe, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — -Frederick Eppleshimer. 
Their children: 

G. 1. Edward. 

2. John Frederick, 

B1.C4.D7.E4.F1. Asahel Walkkr EinvillK (Sarah, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Eydia Roberts Moore, dau. 
of Sharpless and Rachel. Children: 

G. 1. Lucy A. b, 1, 10, 1879. 

2. Alice R., b. 10, 27, 1881. 

3. Arthur W., b. 10, 29, 1SS9. 

Asahel W. Linville died in Florida, 10, 10, 1890. His widow 
resides at Swarthmore, Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 4. F 2. Aquilla J. Einville (Sarah, 



78 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Sarah Trego Echus, dau. 
of Virgil T. and Jaue P., 2, 7, 1877: Their children: 
G. i, Jane Echus. 

2. Sophia D. 

3. Walker. 

4. Marion, d. 2, 9, 1887. 

Aquilla is a coal dealer at 1827 N. 10th St., Phila M Pa. (1906), 
B 1. C 4. D 7. E 4. F 5. Sarah H. Linville (Sarah, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Benj. F. Walter, a mer- 
chant, in Christiana, Lan. Co., Pa. Their children: 
G. 1. Laura. 

2. Maurice F. 

3. Margaret. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 4. F 8. Margaret Einville (Sarah, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Edwin Eawton Moore, 
son of John Moore. Their children: 

G. 1. E. Lawton. 

2. Anna. 

3. Edith T. Res. 434 Carpenter St., Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 5. F 2. Joseph H. Walker (Samuel, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Emma Alexander. Their 
children: 

G. 1. James Blaine. 

2. Joseph Earl. 

3. Mary Emma. 

4. Ann. 

5. Margaretta. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 8. F 3. Flora Ellmaker (Mary Alice, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Edward M. Wallace. 
Children: 

G. 1. Edgar Pearl. 

2. Elizabeth L. 

3. John Ellsworth. 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E 8. F 4. Nathaniel Ellmaker (Mary 
Alice, Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Mary Williams. 
Children: 

G. 1. Cecelia. 

2. Hannah Alice. 

3. John Watson. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 79 

B 1. C 4. D 7. E S. F 5. Sarah Eujmaker (Mary Alice, 
Sarah, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M:— Evan T. Ambler. Children: 
G. i. Caroline Watson. 
2. Mary Elizabeth. 

E. T. A., is Cashier of Quarryville, Pa., National Bank. 

Generation G, Children of F. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. F 1. G 6. Linnaeus Eamborn (Sarah, 
Ellis, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Ann Amanda 
Taylor, 4, 4, 1895, dau. of Richard H. and Eydia Ann, b. 7, 4, 
1861. Their children: 

H. I. Helen, b. 12, 28, 1S95. 

2. Herbert Spencer, b. 3, 3, 189S. 

3. Alva Linnaeus, b. 1, 30, 1900. 

4. Esther Elizabeth, b. S, 21, 1901. 

5. Annie May, b. 5, 1, 1904. 

Res., in Drumore Township, Lan., Co., Pa., on his father 
George's farm (1906). P. O., Bon View. 

B 1. C 4. E 1. F 1. G 7. LucrKTia MottLamborn (Sarah, 
Elois, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — W. Dorsey Black- 
burn, son of Hiramaand Mary Ann Blackburn, 9, 20, 1896. Res., 
Fishertown, Bedford Co., Pa. Their children: 

H. 1. Hermine Lucille, b. 11, 7, 1897; d. 9, 1, 1903. 

2. Edith, b. 11,27, 1S98. 

3. Elenor, b. 1, 3, 1901. 

4. Evelyn, b. 10, 8, 1902. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. F2. G 1. Evaune Webster (Margaret, 
Ellis, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Joseph Cloud, son 
of Edwin and Elizabeth E., 2, 18, 1874. Their children: 

H. 1. George Watters, b. 1, 8, 1876. M. Martha A. Ewing, dau. of 
Thompson and Margaret. Their children: I. 1. Freda 
May, b. 2, 18, 1898. 

2. Clarence Taylor, b. 10, 30, 1S77. 

3. Millie Irene, b. 1, 17, 1880. M, Larkin Steel, son of Nathaniel 

and Sarah, 2, 5, 1903. 

4. William, b. 4, 14, 1SS2. 

5. Myrtle Edna, b. 6, 26, 1SS4. 

6. Leona Dora, b. S, 29, 1S86. 

7. Philena E., b. 12, 18, 1S88. 



80 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

8. Frank Stackhouse, b, io, it, 1890. 

9. Jesse Raymond, b. 10, 5, 1894. 

10. Adella Blanche, b. 11, 21. 1896. 

11. Pauline W., b. 8, 18, 189S. 

B1.C4. Dl. E 1. F 2. G 2. Joseph Webster (Margaret, 
Ellis, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Sophia Fell, dau. 
of Barclay and Hannah, 12, 16, 18S0. Their children: 

H. 1. Jesse Hibbard, b. io, 3, 1881; d. 9, 11, 1S99, at home of his uncle 
Jesse, at Harvey, near Chicago, 111. Int. at Homeville F.B.G 
Chester Co., Pa. 

2. Phebe, b. 3, 27, 1SS3. M. Frank C. Hanna, son of Wm. H. 

and Sarah (Pennock), 12, 23, 1902. Res., Georgia (1906). 
Child: I. 1. Joseph Wm., b. 1904. 2. Mary, b. 1905. 

3. Mary, b. 1, 22, 1S88. 

4. Clarence, b. 1, 4, 1892. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 1. F 2. G 4. Medora Webster (Margaret, 
Ellis, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Howard Kennedy 
Newcomer, son of Lewis and Esther A. (Brosius), 3, 20, 1880. 
(same day as Silver wedding of her parents), at home of the 
brides' parents on farm near Homeville, Chester Co., Pa., by 
Friends Ceremony. P. O., Lincoln University, Pa. (1906). Their 
children: 

H. 1. Rowenna B., b. 2, 7, 1881. 

2. Esther B., b. 8, 26, 18S2. 

3. Wendell Brinton, b. 4, 14, 18S4. 

4. Sarah R., b. 11, 12, 18S7. 

5. Mary C, b. 9, 19, 1890. 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 5. F 1. G 2. Annie C. Wood (Susanna, 
Warrick, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — Samuel P., 
son of Thomas and Elizabeth Martin, of Cochranville, Chester Co., 
Pa., in Mayor's Office, Phila. by Friends Ceremony. P.O. ,(1906) 
Cochranville, Chester Co., Pa. R.F.D. No. 2. Their children: 

H. 1. Charles William, b. 7, 4, 1SS8; d. at 6 days old. 

2. Harold Thomas, b. 9, 26, 1889. Entered Haverford College on 

1 6th birthday. 

3. Elena Susanna, b. 11, 13, 1891. 

4. Ernest Warrick, b. 6, 16, 1S95. 

5. Miriam, b. 1, 26, 1S97. 

6. Anna Mary, b. 12, 12, 1S99. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 81 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 5. F 1. G 3. Alberta Wood (Susanna, 
Warrick, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — William 
Wickersham, son of John and Catherine, 3, 4, 1897 by Friends 
Ceremony, at home of bride's parents, in Russelville, Pa. P. O., 
Russelville, Chester Co., Pa. (1906) 

B 1. C 4. D 1. E 5. F 2. G 1. Evalinh Lydia Coates 
(Pusey, Warrick, Warrick, Samuel, Thomas, Moses) M: — J. 
Howard Broomell, son of Samuel H. and Mary (Cloud), 3, 16, 
1899, at home of bride's parents, Upper Oxford Township, 
Chester Co., Pa. P. O., (1906) Cochranville, Pa., R.F.D. No. 2. 
Child: 

H. i. Helen, b. 4, 7, 1902. 

BRIEF OF TITLE. 

Of a Messuage or tract of 123 A, 92 Ps (old survey) of land 
in Valley (formerely East Cain) township, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, about to be conveyed by Samuel Torbut, to James 
Buchanan, of Wheatland. 

The first, or starting point in the title of this land, on the 
records of Chester County, is the following: 



Release. 

Anthony Morris and 

Israel Pemmerton, Exrs. &c. 

of Anthony Morris, Sr. , dec. 

To 

Moses Coates 



Dated December 14th 
A. D., 1728, and recorded 
in the Recorder's Office in 
Deed Book O, Vol. 14 
page 91, and conveying 
492 acres of land, in fee, 

subject to a yearly quit-rent of one English Silver Shilling per 
100 Acres, to the Proprietory &c. 

The recitals in this Deed of release are important as indicat- 
ing the several links in the chain of title from Penn, down to 
this point, and are, subsequently, as follows: 

That the Proprietary of the Province, William Penn, by 
Indenture of Release, of August 2nd, A.D., 1681, granted to 
Anthony Elton, in fee, five hundred acres of laud to be located 
111 the Province. 

That the said Anthony Elton died, leaving two only children, 
Anthony and Jane: 



82 Geneaology of the Co ales Family. 

That Anthony, the son, by his deed of November 12th, 
A.D., 1702, conveyed four hundred acres, the remainder of said 
five hundred acres, then unlocated, unto Edward Smout, in fee: 

That the said Edward Smout, having intermarried with the 
said Jane, the daughter of said Anthony Elton, the father, ob- 
tained a Proprietary Warrant for the location of three hundred 
and ninety-two acres of land, in right of and as the full remainder 
of the five hundred acres, untaken up, and another Proprietary 
Warrant for one hundred acres contiguous thereto: 

That the said Proprietary by Patent of his commissioners, 
dated October 11th, A.D., 1703, confirmed the said 392 acres 
and 100 acres, in one entire tract, by metes and bounds, unto the 
said Edward Smout, in fee, paying the yearly quit-rent &c, 
which rent is recorded in Record Book A, Vol. 2 page 620. 

That the said Edward Smout died intestate, leaving a widow 7 , 
the aforesaid Jane, and children, viz: Edward, Sylvanus and 
John, that the said Edw T ard, the son, as heir at law, by deed of 
March 4th, A.D., 1712, granted the 492 acres unto Anthony Mor- 
ris. Sr., in fee, the Deed being on record at Philadelphia, in Book 
E, 7 Vol. 8, page 297, that the said Sylvanus Smout released all 
his right and interest in said tract of land, unto said Anthony 
Morris, Sr., by Deed on Record at Philadelphia in Book F, Vol. 
3, page 447 that Jane, the widow of Edward Smout, the father, 
died intestate, and that the said John Smout, the other son, also 
died intestate without issue. 

That the said Anthony Morris, Sr., thus seized of said tract 
of 492 acres of land, by his Will of July 10th, A.D., 1721, and 
on file in the Register General's office at Philadelphia and Chester, 
which include the aforesaid 492 acres, being then unimproved. 

Moses Coates being thus seized of the said tract of four hun- 
dred and ninety-two acres of land, he and his wife conveyed one- 
half (two hundred and forty-six acres) in fee, to their sou 
Thomas Coates, by Deed dated December 2nd, A.D., 1743, and 
recorded in the Recorders office of Chester County in Deed Book 
O, Vol. 14, page 102. 

Thomas Coates, of the township of East Cain, thus seized 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 83 

of the above two hundred and forty-six acres of land, made his 
Will, dated December 16th, A.D. 1792, and subsequently died. 
This Will was proved November 1st, A.D. 1797, and is on record 
in the Registers Office of Chester County, in Will Book K, Vol. 
10, page 18. In that Will, he disposes of his real estate as follows: 
I give and bequeath to my son Samuel, "the plantation I 
live on, with all the appurtances thereunto belonging, to- 
gether with all the residue of my personal estate, to him, his 
heirs and assigns forever, he or they to provide for his son 
Henry, who is deprived of his right reason." 
Samuel Coates, holding the aforesaid two hundred and forty- 
six acres of land, under the Will of his father, as above recited, 
he and his wife, by their Deed dated April 2nd, A.D. 1824, re- 
corded in the Recorders Office of Chester County, in Deed Book 
X, 3 Vol. 70, page 4, sold and conveyed, in fee, to Samuel Tor- 
bet, the present owner, (who has sold and is about to convey 
the same to James Buchanan, of Wheatland) one hundred and 
twenty three acres and ninety two perches thereof, with the 
right of a lane or roadway, twenty feet wide, from the southern 
line of the tract (123 A 92 P) to the Lancaster turnpike, parallel 
with the west line of the tract, and to enter the turnpike, fifty 
seven perches easterly from said line. 

Prepared from the Records in the Recorders and Registers 
Offices of Chester County, by 

Nimrod Strickland, 
West Chester, Pa. ) Conveyancer. 

March 1, A.D. 1865. j 

Copied from the original by the owner of the Thomas Coates 
tract, J. Andrew Seltzer, Cain, Pa., for Dr. Truman Coates, 
Oxford, Pa., b mo., 1905. 

Cain, Pa,, 3, 16, 1904. 
Dr. Truman Coates. 

Dear Sir: — In looking over my records I find that in 1728 
Anthony Morris and Israel Pemberton, Executors of Anthony 
Morris, Sr., deceased, Conveyed to Moses Coates 492 acres of 



84 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

land situated in East Cain Township, then Moses Coates and 
wife Conveyed one half of this land being (246) acres, to his son 
Thomas Coates by deed dated December 2nd, A.D. 1743. 

Thomas Coates thus owning the 246 acres of land made his 
Will, dated December 16th, A.D. 1792, and subsequently died. 
This Will, was proved November 1st, A.D. 1797, giving to his 
son Samuel this plantation. 

Samuel Coates holding these 246 acres he and his wife, by 
their Deed dated April 2nd, A.D., 1824, sold and conveyed to 
Samuel Torbet one half of this tract of laud, one hundred and 
twenty three acres. The farm that I now occupy. It lies North 
of the Turnpike, and Mr. Ambrose Fulton owns the other half, 
joining on the south, I suppose the balance of this 492 acres is 
the Hatfield farm and probably W. C. Valentine. 

In 1865 Samuel Torbet sold this farm to Ex-President James 
Buchanan. His Executors sold it to William McCanna, and 
in 1875, McCanna sold it to Mr. J. A. Seltzer, who owns and oc- 
cupies it at present. I remember Dr. Jesse Coates very well, he 
was my fathers physician for many years. He doctored me 
through a spell of sickness nearly fifty years ago. 

I am, very truly }'ours, 

J. A. Sei/tzer, 

Cain, Pa. 



THIS INDENTURE made the third day of April in the Year 
of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Between 
Warrick Miller of the Township of East Cain, County of Chester 
in the Province of Pennsylvania Yoemau of the one Part and 
Thomas Coates of the Township, County and Province aforesaid 
of the other part. Whereas, Thomas Kartt of the Township, 
County and Province aforesaid Mason in and by a Certain Lease 
of Indenture under his Hand and Seal being Dated the tenth 
Day of May Anno Domini 1769 for the Consideration therein 
mentioned did Grant and Confirm unto the said Warrick Miller 
a Certain piece or Parcel of Limestone Land Situate lying and 
being in the Township of East Calu aforesaid * * * * 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 85 

Beginning at a marked Whiteoak in or near the Line Between 
the Land of said Thomas Hartt and Moses Coates thence West 
five Perches to a Post thence South Eight Perches to a Post 
thence East five Perches to a Post thence North Eight Perches 
to the Place of Beginning Containing forty Perches Besides 
liberty for a Road or Cart way of Ten feet wide from said Piece 
of Land to the Gap Road To Hold to him the said Warrick 
Miller his heirs and Assigns so long as there is or shall be any 
Limestone in said Piece or Parcel of Land As in and by said 
Lease or Indenture. Relations being thereunto had more fully 
and at Large appear. 



Now this Indenture Wituesseth that the said Warrick Miller 
for and in Consideration of the Covenants and Agreements herein 
after mentioned to be fulfilled and kept on the part and behalf of 
him the said Thomas Coates his Heirs and Executors Hath 
Granted Demised and Sett and by these presents doth Grant De- 
mise and Sett unto the said Thomas Coates his Heirs and Execu- 
tors the above Described piece or parcel of Limestone Land and 
uninterrupted Liberty and Privelege to Enter upon the said 
Premises and every part thereof and Quarry and Carry away to 
Burn as much of said Limestone as he or they or any of them 
shall see cause to use on the Plantation where the said Thomas 
Coates now lives from Time to Times and at all Time so long as 
there is or shall be any Limestone in said Described Premises or 
in any part thereof Providing they do not hinder the Said War- 
rick Miller his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns to 
come on said ..Premises and dig Carry away and Burn said Lime 
stone in like manner so much as he or they see Cause. It is also 
agree'd Between the said Warrick Miller and Thomas Coates 
that If any difference shall at any Time or Times hereafter arise 
between them the said Warrick Miller and Thomas Coates or be- 
tween their Heirs, Executors or the Administrators of Warrick 
Miller Concerning or about the said Limestone that they shall 
Choose three Indifferent Persons who shall have full Power to 
Decide all Matters in Dispute Concerning the Same if Either of 



86 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

them shall be Sued by the above said Thomas Hartt his Heirs 
Executors Administrators or Assigns the other party shall pay 
half the Cost and Costs arising on account of said Land Likewise 
it's agree'd Between the said Warrick Miller and Thomas Coates 
that they nor any one of them or for Either of them shall not 
Work over the Quarry so as to throw and Leave Earth or Rotten 
Stone or other Incumberance in the way of the other party but 
shall from time to time and at all Times so long as there is any 
stone in said Quarry leave it in as good order and Condition as 
he or they shall or do find it and the said Warrick Miller his 
Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns shall from Time to 
Time so long as there is any Stone in said Quarry Lett and allow 
the said Thomas Coates his Heirs and Executors have and Enjoy 
an Equal Liberty with him or them for to use or the above 
mentioned Plantation Paying the Sum of Ten Shillings Lawful 
money of said Province to said Warrick Miller, his Heirs or As- 
signs for Every Kiln or for every five hundred Bushels he or 
they or any of them Burn when Burned Each of said parties 
shall be at half the Expense of Fencing said Land Provided al- 
ways the Covenants and Agreement herein before Contained are 
Complyed with. And for the true Performance of all and Every 
of the Covenants &c. to the other Party his Heirs Executors &c. 
In the Penal Sum of Fifty Pounds Lawful Money of the afore- 
said Province in Witness whereof the said Parties to these pres- 
ents their hands and Seals have Interchangeably set the Day and 
Year above written. 

Warrick Miu,kr (Seal)*. 
Sealed and Delivered 
in the Presence of us 
Curtis Lewis 

her 

Sarah X McVky 

mark 

*The Seal on original is red wax with imprint of man's head with crown. 




bLic 



Residence of Samuel Coates, second child of emigrants/v^BRAj 
Near Cain Station. Owned (HHXi) by Gilbert Hatfield. The original 
porch was wide and oval in shape in front with peaked 



banisters and seats, 
meetings, when the 



■ ■—I-"."-.,, vw.w ,^..nv<. roof, and 
Here the Friends were wont to hold their 
oval ceiling would add volume to the voice. 




Clock owned by Moses Coates, Founder of Coatesville 



PART THREE. 



B 2. Samukl Coatks (Moses) Second child of Moses and 
Susanna. M: — Elizabeth, dau. of Aaron and Rose (Pearson) 
Mendenhall of Cain Township, Chester Co., Pa., 3, 1, 1743, in 
East Cain Meeting. 

At Gwynedd M. M., held 25th of 11 mo.. 1742, an applica- 
tion was made in behalf of Samuel Coates for a certificate to 
Bradford M. M. where he intends to locate. 

22nd of 12 mo., a certificate was granted Samuel Coates. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 

At a Meeting held at Bradford the 17th day of 1st mo. 1743, 
Samuel Coates and Elizabeth Mendenhall here signified their in- 
tention of taking each other in marriage, this being the first time. 
Samuel is desired to produce to our next meeting a certificate 
from the M. Mtg. to which he belongs, of his conversation and 
clearness from all other women in relation of marriage; their 
parents being here hath signified their consent thereto. 

At our M. M. of Bradford, held in Cain the 21st day of 2nd 
Mo. 1743, Samuel Coates and Elizabeth Mendenhall appeared 
here and signified that they continue their intention of taking 
each other in marriage; this being the second time, and Samuel 
having produced to this Meeting a Certificate from North Wales 
Monthly Meeting of his orderly conversation and clearness from 
all other women on account of marriage as also for his removal 
to settle among us; and nothing appearing to obstruct their pro- 
ceedings; this Meeting leaves them at their liberty, to accomplish 
their intended marriage according to the good order used amongst 
us; and appoint Robert Miller and Phineas Lewis to see the 

(S7j 



88 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

orderly accomplishment thereof, and to make report to next 
Meeting, and to return the Certificate to be recorded. 

At a M. M., held in Bradford the 19th of 3 mo., 1743. The 
Friends report that the marriage of Samuel Coates and Elizabeth 
Mendenhall was orderly accomplished in Cain Meeting the first 
day of this month, and hath returned the Certificate to this 
meeting. 

Extracted from Marriage Certificate of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Mendenhall) Coates: 

Whereas, Samuel Coates son of Moses Coates of Charlestown 
in the County of Chester in the Province of Pennsylvania, and 
Elizabeth Mendenhall, daughter of Aaron Mendenhall of East 
Cain in said County, married at Cain, 1st, 3 mo., 1743. 

Samuel and Elizabeth settled on one half of the 492 acres of 
land his father Moses, bought in Cain Township. This farm is 
adjoining the Village of Cain and Station of that name on P. C. R. R. 
All but 38 acres is now (1905) owned by J. Gilbert Hatfield, on 
which is an extensive Kaolin Works. The above 38 acres was 
sold by Isaac Coates and wife Hannah, to John Jones, saddler, in 
1790, and is now (1905) owned by W. A. Valentine a blacksmith. 
Children of Samuel and Elizabeth Coates: 

C. i. Aaron, b. 4, 6, 1744. 

2. Moses, b. 11,4, 1746; d 8, 4, 1816; int. in E. Cain F.B.G. 

3. Isaac, b. 2, 1, 1748. d. Int. E. Cain F.B.G. A Minister of note in 

Society of Friends. 

4. A daughter, died young; no dates. 

8, 16, 1746. Cain Meeting complains of Samuel Coates and 
others for going to the house of Robert Miller in the night and 
abusing said Robert by calling him many bad names. 

11, 15, 1746. Report that he had made acknowledgement 
to Robert. 

4, 18, 1754. Cain Meeting complains of Elizabeth Coates, 
Administrator of Samuel Coates for not answering a demand of 
Thomas Paine concerning some timber. 

5, 16, 1754. A committe report the debt of ^3.10, but 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 89 

Moses Coates, the guardian for the children, being here, desires 
the case may be heard by Arbitrators. 

6, 20, 1754. The matter reported settled. 

8, 19, 1756 Caleb Kirk and Elizabeth Coates declares inten- 
tions. A committee appointed to see that the children's rights 
are secured. 

9, 16, 1756. They appear the second time. 

10, 21, 1756. The marriage reported to have been accom- 
plished, 9, 30, 1756. They had four children. 

At a M. Mtg. held at Bradford by adjournments the 25th 
day of 7 Mo., 1760. Thomas Stalker and Thomas Pirn were ap- 
pointed to prepare a Certificate for Aaron Coates, he being placed 
an apprentice within the varge of Goshen M. Mtg. 

8, 15, 1760. Certificate signed for Aaron Coates to Goshen. 

7, 19, 1765. Aaron Coates produced certificate from Uwchlau 
dated 7, 4, 1765. 

B 2. C 1. Aaron Coates (Samuel, Moses) M: — Mary, dau. 
of Robert Cox, late of East Cain, 7, 30, 1766, at East Cain Meet- 
ing. From Gwynedd M. M. record to Bradford M. M. 30th of 
11 mo., 1749-50 M. M, giving Aaron Coates certificate, that he 
is a man of orderly life and conversation and clear of marriage 
engagements, was received here. 

6, 13, 1766. Aaron Coates and Mary Cox declare intentions, 
his Mother being present. 

7, 25, 1766. They appear second time. 

8, 15, 1766. Report that the marriage was accomplished 
7, 30, 1766. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Marriage Records: 

Aaron Coates, son of Samuel, deceased, of East Cain, in 
County of Chester, and Province of Pennsylvania, and Mary 
Cox, daughter of Robert Cox, deceased of same place married 
30th of 7 Mo., 1766 at East Cain. Witnesses: Caleb Kirk, 
Elizabeth Kirk, Rose Mendenhall, Lawrence Cox, Rose Packer, 
Jane Cox, Rebeckah Cox, Gideon Pearson, Deborah Cox, Jacob 



90 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Cox, Samuel Coates, Isaac Coates, Moses Coates, Sarah Coates, 
Elizabeth Coates and others. 

9, 12, 1766. They request a Certificate to Warrington M. M. 

4, 17, 1767. A certificate being granted, an objection being 
removed. Their children: 

D. i. Samuel, died UNM. 2. Elizabeth. 3. Moses. 4. Sidney, b. 6, 
2, 1777. 

9, 15, 1775. Aaron Coates produced a certificate from War- 
rington for self and wife Mary, and children: Samuel, Elizabeth 
and Moses, dated 5, 6, 1775. 

5, 14, 1779. E. Cain complains of Aaron Coates for using 
unsavory expressions to Joshua Mendenhall and resisting when 
he went to put lime into the house Aaron lived. 

8, 13, 1779. His acknowledgement accepted. (J. M. also 
offered one). 

8, 17, 1781. Aaron Coates received a certificate to Warring- 
ton with wife and children, Samuel, Elizabeth, Moses, Sidney 
and Rachel. 

9, 13, 1782. Elizabeth Coates, certificate requested to Hor- 
sham M. M. 

11, 12, 1784. Samuel Coates certificate from Warrington, 
dated 9, 11, 1784. 

12, 18, 1789. Sidney Coates, dau. of Aaron Coates, to York. 

I , 15, 1790. Samuel Coates, son of Aaron, certificate to 
York. 

II, 12, 1790. Certificate from York, 10, 6, 1790. 

6, 12, 1795. Samuel Coates, son of Aaron, certificate to 
York. 

B 2. C 2. Mosks Coates (Samuel, Moses) M: — Hannah, 
dau. of Thomas and Hannah Musgrave. Thomas was an Irish 
Quaker of Sadsbury Township, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Marriage Records: 

Moses Coates requests certificate to Exeter to marry Hannah 
Musgrave. 

13th of 4 Mo., 1770. Certificate granted to Moses Coates. 




" Brandywine Mansion/* — First house built in Coatesville. 

Uesidenee of Moses Conies and built by himself and father, Samuel, on '-'nd Av< 
near Brandywine. den. Washington was enl( j rt;iined here. 




Residence of Moses Coates, (Founder of Coatesville, Pa.,) and his wife, Mary. 
Stone in front, "<J" at top, and "il & M" in the niiddJe, with "18(H)" at bottom, date of 
building. 



Gencaology of the Coates Family. 91 

Moses Coates became owner of a large tract of land, now oc- 
cupied by the town of Coatesville, Chester Co., Pa., which was 
laid out and named by himself, and was the first Post Master of 
the place in 1812. Hannah Musgrave was born 2,12,1752, Married 
Moses Coates in 1770, and died 4, 5, 1775, of a Nervous Fever 
and interred 7th at East Cain F.B.G., where later Moses was 
laid. Their children: 

D. i. Elizabeth, b. 3, 12, 1771; d. 9, 9, 1729, of consumption. Interred 
at West Chester, Pa. 

9, 13, 1782. Elizabeth Coates Certificate requested to Hor- 
sham M. Mtg. 
2. Hannah, b. 6, 13, 1773; d. 5, 25, 1S01, of consumption. 
2, iS, 1 791. Hannah Coates, Jr., Certificate to York. 

Hannah (Musgrave) Coates died, when her husband, Moses, 
married, 5, 1777, Mary Knight Vickers. 

15, 3, 1777. Moses Coates requested a certificate to Buck- 
ingham Monthly Meeting for marriage with Mary Vickers, dau. 
of Peter and Ann, b. 11, 27, 1750; d. 10, 12, 1824. Interred at 
Marlborough, Stark Co., Ohio. 

18, 4, 1777. Certificate granted to Moses Coates. 

Buckingham M. Mtg. Women's Minutes: 

7, 5, 1777. Moses Coates and Mary Vickers appear and de- 
clare their intentions of marriage. 

5, 5, 1777. Moses Coates and Mary Vickers are at liberty 
to proceed in marriage with each other. 

2nd of 6mo., 1777. Marriage of Moses Coates and Mary 
Vickers reported as accomplished. Their children: 

2-1. Isaac, b. 3, 7, 1778; d. 6, 1, 1853. Int. at Deer Creek, Stark Co., O. 

2-2. Ann Eliza, b. 9, 14, 1779; d. 4, 3, 184$, of lung fever. Int. at Sandy 
Springs, near Hanover, Ohio. 

2-3. Caleb, b. 4, 30, 1781; d. 6, 19, 1869. 

2-4. Esther, b. 2, 25, 1783; d. 8, 28, 1859, of dropsy. 

2-5. Elisha, b. 9, 20, 1784; d, 2, 5, 1797, after a short illness. 

2-6. Sarah, b. 7, 9. 1786; d. 3, 7, 1861. 

2-7. Mary, b. 5, 21, 1788; d. 9, 8, 1788. 

2-8. Moses, b. 8, 30, 1789; d. 6, 29, 1844. 

2-9. Aquilla, b. 10, 9, 1791; d. 11, 6, 1862. Int. at Deer Creek Meeting, 
Stark Co., Ohio. 



92 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

2-10. Amos, b. t, iS, 1794; d. 4, 25, 1863. Int. at Sandy Hill, Stark Co., O. 
2-1 1. Jesse, M. D., b. 3, 4, 1796; d. 8, 2, 1868, in Coatesville, Pa. 

B 2. C 3. Isaac Coatks (Samuel, Moses) M: — Hannah H. 
Stalker, b. 3, 9, 1752. Married 12, 1, 1773, at East Cain, dau. 
of Thomas and Grace. 

10, 15, 1773. Isaac Coates and Hannah Stalker declare in- 
tentions first time. 

11, 12, 1773. They appear second time. 

12, 17, 1773. Report that the marriage was accomplished 
12, 1, 1773. Their children: 

D. 1. Beulah, b. 7, 19, 1774. 

2. Grace, b. 5, 25, 1776. 

3. Lydia, b. 2, 6, 1778; d. 5, 18, 1839. 

4. Rebecca, b. 2, 2, 1780. 

5. Seymour, b. 2, 27, 1783. 

6. Amy, b. 6, 4, 1785. 

7. Zilla, b. 8, 16, 1787. 

8. Israel, b. 4, 24, 1792. 

9. Lindley, b. 3, 3, 17945 d> 6, 1856. 
Bradford M. Mtg. Marriage Records: 

Isaac Coates, son of Samuel Coates, of East Cain in the 
County of Chester and Province of Pennsylvania, deceased, and 
Hannah Stalker, dau. of Thomas Stalker of the same place, mar- 
ried 1, 12, 1773, at East Cain * * * * * * 
Witnesses: Thomas Stalker, Grace Stalker, Elizabeth Kirk, 
Jonathan Coates, Thomas Coates, Moses Coates, Lydia Menden- 
hall, Mary Harrison, Ann Coates, Henry Coates, Samuel Coates, 
Joshua Mendenhall, Eli Kirk, Jonathan Mendenhall, Caleb Kirk, 
Elizabeth Coates, Phebe Coates, Ann Coates, Junr., James 
Parker, Moses Coates and others. 

5, 14, 1784. Isaac Coates, appointed overseer of E. Cain 
meeting, in place of Samuel Coates. 

7, 17, 1789. Isaac Coates appointed clerk. 

9, 13, 1793. Isaac Coates, minute to attend Baltimore yearly 
meeting. 

3, 14, 1794. Isaac Coates succeeded by Joseph Barnard as 
clerk. 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 93 

-, 18, 1798. Isaac Coates, miuute to attend N. Y. yearly 
meeting. 

4, 3, 1809. Isaac Coates appointed an Elder of E. Cain 
meeting. 



JOURNAL OF JOURNEY TO THE INDIAN COUNTRY. 

BY ISAAC COATES, OF CAI^N, CHESTER COUNTY. 

The following journal, kept by Isaac Coates, a Friend, of 
Cain, Chester County, describes a journey taken to visit "the 
Indian Country" in Western Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York, 
in 1799. It gives an animated description of the country passed 
through, the experiences of the travelers, etc., as well as many 
interesting details concerning Friends and the Indians. 

Isaac was the son of Samuel Coates, of East Cain township, 
and was born Fourth month, 12, 1748. He married Hannah 
Stalker, of the same township, b. 3d mo, 9, 1752, and lived on a 
farm that had been his father's, near the present Cain Station, 
on the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was from here, presumably, 
that he set off on the journey described below. He was a mem- 
ber of East Cain Meeting, and is buried in that burying-ground. 

6th day the 23d of the Eighth month, 1799, after a solid time 
in my family I left home on my journey into the Indian Country 
and Upper Canada. 

24th. With some difficulty crossed the Susquehanna, (the 
river being low); passed through York Town to rn.y brother 
Caleb Kirk's. This day's ride, twenty-five miles. 

25th. Stayed meeting at York, and lodged at brother Caleb's 
two nights. 

26th. Rode to Warrington, eleven miles; attended quarterly 
meeting; passed a furnace known by the name of Kittera's. The 
precipices on both right and left of one of them exhibited a 
magnificent appearance. Then ascended the mountain called 
the Blue Ridge, the ascent and descent of which is three miles, 
affording a prospect which shows the wonderful works of the 



94 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Author of Nature. Lodged at Skinner's in Horse Valley. This 
day's ride, forty-one and a half miles. 

28th. In the morning, ascended and descended two large 
mountains, the valley between them called Path Valley, in which 
is a small village called Ferrisburg. After crossing the moun- 
tains, very poor broken land thinly inhabited, to Fort Littleton, 
twelve miles from Skinner's; here we breakfasted. In crossing 
those mountains and valleys my mind was much employed in 
contemplating the wonderful works of an all-wise Creator. 

From thence to Berlin, thirteen miles. On our way we met 
an old man who had just killed a large buck wiiich had horns 
with a number of prongs, covered with the velvet, which he had 
skinned and had some of the meat tied up in it carrying about 
his neck in the manner of a knapsack. In riding six miles we 
came to the foot of the great Allegheny mountains where is some 
good land; buckwheat and oats about of an equal ripeness, both 
good, but the buckwheat extraordinary. m 

After we got over the mountains the timber was very thick 
but much destroyed with fire. Two or three miles before we 
came to Berlin the laud appeared to be excellent, covered with 
heavy timber, black oak, white oak, red oak, hickory, and sugar 
maple, grass and other vegetables very flourishing, it having been 
a wet growing season. This day's ride, thirty-six miles. 

30th. Took an early set-off from Berliu, being a village of 
about 50 houses; passed through some very rough lands and roads 
on which I saw a rattlesnake about three feet long with ten 
rattles, lying in the road, appearing to have been just killed by a 
wagon wheel running over it. 

From thence to George Bachelor's, fourteen miles in which 
we crossed what is called Laurel Hill, being one mountain after 
another for seven or eight miles of the way. Almost all those 
mountains that go by the aforesaid name are the most fertile of 
any I have yet seen; the trees and vegetables of every kind are 
so luxuriant I could not help feeling some attachment to the 
place; but when I considered the exceeding rough mountainous 
face of the surface and the intolerable road to and from the place, 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 95 

I am content if I should live to return to spend the remainder of 
my days in Chester County. Proceeded to Connelstown. Here 
on the Yoghagena river the people were employed in building 
flat-bottomed boats, the stern of which they cover with thin 
boards for a shelter. Some of them are thirty, some forty, and 
some fifty feet long and twelve wide, in which they will carry 
360 barrels of flour or irou or other produce in proportion, to 
Kentucky or New Orleans. 

Then passed over many hills and valleys to Reese Cadwalla- 
der's, twenty miles. Passed a new paper-mill occupied by Jon- 
athan Sharpless, on Redstone creek; also Samuel Jackson's grist 
mill at the mouth of said creek, over which there is a large bridge 
near thirty feet high. The land thus far through the Redstone 
settlement is very rough and mountainous, and appears to be 
very fertile, producing wheat, rye, oats, buckwheat, and grass in 
abundance even on the top of the hills, and abundance of lofty 
timber of many sorts, particularly sugar maple and white oak. 

Ninth month, 1st, being First-day, attended Redstone meet- 
ing. In the afternoon crossed the Monongahela at Bridgetown, 
the banks of which, I am informed, will average forty feet. Rode 
five miles of the roughest road I have yet passed to Francis 
Townsend's. 

2nd. Attended quarterly meeting at Westland, which not- 
withstanding some weaknesses [and] disorder appeared in the 
conduct of the young people, was a comfortable, solid time, there 
being a number of well-concerned, valuable Friends engaged in 
conducting the business of this remote and newly established 
quarterly meeting. Here I met with a number of my former 
acquaintances who had removed to this country years past, divers 
of them in low or straightened circumstances, that now appeared 
to live in fullness and plenty; many of whom I hope are in a 
good measure thankful to their kind Benefactor who hath spread 
them a table in the wilderness and provided a comfortable asylum 
in this western country. We were truly glad to see each other. 
This night, lodged at my kind friend, Jones Catel's. 



96 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

3d. Passed the time very agreeably amongst our friends 
about Bridgeport. 

5th Rode eight miles to one Barclay's, got breakfast. Up 
this narrow valley the greatest quantity of sugar maple with 
troughs for collecting sap appeared, of any place I have yet seen, 
though they abound through the country in such plenty that I 
think if the inhabitants are careful, and frugal they need never 
import the luxury of sugar. From thence to Pittsburg, fifteen 
miles. About one mile from Barclay's is a sawmill, occupied 
and owned by one, Baldwin, who moved from Newlin, a friendly 
man. When we arrived on the top of the mountain, we got the 
first sight of Pittsburg. Also had a view of the remains of the 
old French Fort Duquesue and the English fort, which are both 
very much demolished and beautiful grass plots in their place. 
This town appears to be a lively place of trade containing per- 
haps 200 houses. 

Ninth month, 6th, 1799. Set off early from Pittsburg and 
immediately crossed the Allegheny river, a beautiful stream about 
a quarter of a mile wide. For about two or three miles after cross- 
ing, we rocle through the richest piece of land I think I ever be- 
held. The stately walnuts [were] four feet through, and 
a great length, and other timber in proportion, from thence 
to one, Bovear's, where three of our company lodged. James 
Cooper and myself rode six miles further to my cousin, Abner 
Coates's, who is just newly settled in the woods; has got about 
ten acres of land cleared and seems in a likely wa}' to make a 
living. He was very kind and glad to see me; tied up our horses, 
fed them with bran and cut corn tops, with which they seemed 
to do very well. All this stage appeared to me to be very poor, 
until we turned off the road and got near Abner' s. where the 
land appears tolerably level and pretty good soil. 

7th. Rode from Abner Coates's to Funk's, seventeen miles. 
From thence to McClern's, nine miles. We stayed all night, and 
lodged comfortably in the barn. 

8th. Set off early and rode to Franklin [county seat of Ven- 
ango county, Pa.], a small town of perhaps tensor fifteen houses, 



v 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 97 

on French creek, a small distance above the fort at the junction 
of said creek and the Allegheny river, thirteen miles, proceeded 
from here to Jonathan Titus', on Oil Creek, eighteen miles. 

About twelve miles from Franklin we came across a cabin 
and a few acres of grouud cleared, where the people looked clean 
and decent; had abundance of watermelons with which they re- 
galed us plentifully without charge. A few more cabins and 
small lots cleared we saw on our way between French Creek and 
Oil Creek. Rattlesnakes abound here. I saw a large one of 
about three feet nine inches long, aud about as thick as my 
wrist. I alighted and killed it; cutoff the the rattles, being nine. 
Great numbers of wild turkeys are here; we saw several flocks 
containing forty or more and might easily have shot some of 
them if we had had guns and ammunition. 

We arrived at Titus's a little before sunset; got our horses 
to good pasture, and lodged comfortably in his barn. Said Titus 
being a young man, settled here on Oil Creek in the woods about 
two and a half years ago, has made a great improvement for the 
time; owns 400 acres of laud, the most of it a rich bottom; has 
got about twenty-six acres of excellent corn in the ground, a 
considerable quantit}? of wheat in stack; a spring of excellent 
water near the door, large enough to turn a breast-mill; so that 
upon the whole I think this farm likely iu time to be of most in- 
estimable value. Oil Creek took its name from the oil which is 
skimmed oft the water iu great quantities. 

9th. Being very rainy, I rode two miles to a blacksmith at 
Oil Creek mill, got a shoe on my mare and returned to my com- 
pany at Titu's, where we remained all this day, it being very 
wet, and lodged in the same barn. 

10th. Being a fine morning, we set off early and rode twenty- 
nine miles near the mouth of a large stream called Brokenstraw, 
where we pitched our tent, kindled a fire, and lodged in the 
woods. Many places the timber is, I believe, from one hundred 
to two hundred feet high, and thickly set, insomuch that a great 
part of the face of the ground and rock is scarcely ever saluted 
with the luminous ra)^s of the sun. I saw one rock about twenty 



98 Geneaology of the Coaies Family. 

feet in diameter, which had seven trees on it, some of which were 
two or three feet over and perhaps one hundred and fifty feet 
high and the rocks ten or twelve feet high. I think we saw neith- 
er house nor improvement for twenty miles. As I rode along this 
day I frequently experienced a transition of ideas; while passing 
through the dark shades of the thick and lofty timber which 
sometimes appeared like a desolate, gloomy wilderness compar- 
able to the gloom of eternal night; and other times so great, so 
grand, so magnificent that it became truly transporting. 

11th. Set off early, without taking breakfast or feeding our 
horses, and with some difficulty got along, the Indian path up 
the river being in many places hard to be discovered, to a place 
called Warren [now the county seat of Warren county], being a 
newly laid out town, but without much building except one cabin 
and a storehouse. 

Here we breakfasted and fed our horses. The people in the 
cabin were very kind, made our chocolate for us and gave us 
some good pigeon soup. Distance nine miles. Here we hired a 
guide; rode over the Connowongo, and followed our guide with 
undescribable difficulty about sixteen miles to Cornplanter's 
settlement. The logs, the brush, and thick-set young timber 
rendered this stage extremely difficult and tiresome; almost a 
continual succession of logs, in many places three or four in a 
perch, as high as our horses could step over, and may of them 
they had to jump; and the young growth being so thick that if 
we were two rods apart we would have to call out to each other 
in fear of being lost. 

About an hour before sunset we reached the new house 
which Cornplanter is getting built, and the schoolhouse where 
Henry Simmons teaches the young Indians, at which place we 
met with Henry, greatly to our mutual comfort, and where we 
tarried all night in the schoolhouse. At this place there are 
several comfortable houses building, it being about one mile 
lower down the river than where Cornplanter's village stands, 
and appears to be on more suitable ground, which with the advice 
of our young men, the Indian inhabitants of the town just above, 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 99 

proposed to move. Cornplauter and many others of the nation 
came this evening to visit us, and appeared to be much pleased 
with our coming. 

12th. This morning the old chief and some of his connections 
brought us some cucumbers to help out our breakfast, and im- 
mediately returned to his village. We then soon set off up the 
river, Henry Simmons bearing us company, and in about one 
mile we came to the town. Stopped a few minutes with the 
Indians who gathered around us apparently much pleased with 
our arrival. We proposed a council or conference with them, to 
be held in two days after that time, to which they readily assent- 
ed, and agreed to send out some runners to inform their people. 
We then took leave of them for the present and proceeded up 
and across the river twice to Genesinguhta, to our dear friends, 
Halliday Jackson and Joel Swayne, whom we met with mutual 
joy, and rested pretty much in the house the remainder of this 
day. 

Ninth month, 14th, 1799. After breakfast, prepared to set 
off nine miles down the river to Cornplanter's village,* in order 
to attend the council before appointed, and nine of us embarked 
in a canoe to wit: Indian John, Halftown, Halliday Jackson, 
Joel Swayne, Joshua Sharpies, Thomas Stewardson, James Cooper 
and myself, and Hugh Hartshorn. Had a pleasant sail down 
the river, and arrived at our destined port a little before 11 o'clock, 
divers of the distant chiefs being collected before we came. Be- 
fore we sat in council, walked about, viewing some of the Indian 
cottages and their dress, which would take more time to describe 
than I am at this time disposed to take. About an hour after 
we arrived, a large horn, something like a Frenck horn, was 
blown, in order to collect the chiefs and others to council; and in 
a short time they collected in a part of Cornplanter's house or 

*Note. — Genesinguhta, where the travelers met Halliday Jackson and 
Joel Swayne, was on the Allegheny Reservation of the Senecca Indians, on 
the Allegheny river, just above the line, in New York State. Cornplanter 
had a village and private reservation of his own — about 1300 acres — down 
the river, and below the line, in Warren county, Pennsylvania. He called 
it Genesedaga. The town of Kinzua is now on the opposite side of the river. 



100 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

cabin, perhaps to the number of thirty or more. We all sat 
down in stillness a short space, when the old chief stood up (his 
son Henry O'Beil interpreting), and addressed us in substance as 
follows: 

"Brothers, I am glad the good Spirit has favored you all with 
health in your long journey to come and see us and take us by 
the hand, so that we may brighten the chain of friendship; and 
now some of us are collected, we should be glad to hear what you 
have to say to us." 

We then informed them that we had taken a long journey to 
see our young men who were settled among our Indian brothers, 
and that we had not much that we knew of to say to the Indians; 
only to have known from themselves how they liked our young 
men being amongst them, and whether they thought they were 
likely to be useful to them or not. We then had our certificate 
read and interpreted to them, with which they expressed satis- 
faction; and we having agreed upon a short piece of advice or 
queries to lay before them, which we had in writing, it was read 
by paragraphs and interpreted to them as follows: 

"Brothers, you have now heard that our coming here was 
to see how you and our young men who live amongst you are 
getting along. We are glad the God Spirit has favored us to 
meet you in health, and given us this opportunity of taking you 
by the hand and brightening the chain gf friendship. Now broth- 
ers, we should like to hear from your own mouths if you are 
quite satisfied with our young men living amongst you. They 
came here with a hope of being useful, by instructing you in a 
better way of managing your laud and providing for yourselves 
and your cattle. We desire you to speak freely brothers. It has 
been some satisfaction to us in riding through your town to see 
marks of industry taking place; that you are building better and 
warmer houses to live in; and that so much of your cleared land 
is planted with corn, potatoes, beans, squashes, cucumbers, etc., 
and to see these articles kept in good order. Brothers, we ob- 
serve where your new houses are building, that the timber is very 
much cut of! a rich flat which we wish you encouraged to clear 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 101 

and make it fit for plowing. We believe it to be very good land 
for wheat, as well as corn, and as the white people are settling 
around you, the deer and other wild game will grow scarce and 
more difficuli to be taken. We therefore hope that more of your 
men will assist in clearing land, fencing it, planting it with corn, 
and sowing it with wheat. You will then have a supply of pro- 
vision more certain to depend upon than hunting. Brothers, we 
were pleased to see your stock of cattle increased; the rich bot- 
toms on the river will be plenty for them to live on in the sum- 
mer season, but as your winters are long and cold, it will require 
something for them to live on in the winter. Now the white 
people keep their cattle on hay, on straw, and on corn-fodder. 
Straw you cannot get until you raise wheat or other grain; the 
rich bottoms, if they w T ere put in order, would produce a great 
deal of ha}'; but for an immediate supply, we think, if as soon as 
you gather your corn you would cut the stalks close at the 
ground, bind them up in small bundles, and put them in stack, 
as our young men do, they would keep the cattle part of the 
cold weather. Brothers, we are glad to see a quantity of new 
fence made this summer, near where our young men live, and we 
would not have you get discouraged at the labor it takes; for if 
you will clear a little more land every year and fence it, you will 
soon get enough to raise what bread you want, as well as some 
for grass to make hay for winter. Brothers, we understand you 
are desirous to discourage whiskey from being brought amongst 
yon, with which we are much pleased, and should be glad you 
could entirely keep it away; for to get it, you give your money 
which you should have to buy clothes with, and to buy oxen and 
plows with to work your land; and it does not do you any good." 
After which a solemn silence took place, in which I thought 
I felt love to flow to the poor natives, accompanied by a strong 
desire that they might be prevailed upon to wholly decline the 
drinking of distilled spirits; for truly I think until some reforma- 
tion in that respect takes place amongst them, the solid ground 
on which we can expect their profitable civilization is small; and 
though I felt as I did, it seemed discouraging to offer anything 



102 Geneaology af the Coates Family. 

to them on the occasion, considering my own inability and the 
imperfect interpreter we had — being one who hath a strong in- 
clination to the evil habit himself. So I had liked to have 
omitted saying anything, until my friend, Joshua Sharpies, 
whispered to me and told me if I had anything to say to them 
not to omit it. I then addressed them in substance as follows: 

1 rothers, your brothers, the Quakers, who have come a 
long way to see you, believe that the Great Spirit made both 
white men and red men, and placed them on this great island, 
gave them many good things to live upon such as grain, flesh, 
fruit, etc., and also gave them understanding hearts. And we 
also believe that his design or intention was that we should love 
and serve him, and not only love him and our own people but 
love and be at peace with all people of all nations and colors. 
But some white men became very cunning and sought out new 
inventions, one of which was making rum, whiskey, brandy, etc., 
out of the good things that he had given them, which at first 
was used in very small quantities as medicine; but as it became 
more plenty, many white men got to love it and drink more of 
it, insomuch that they became drunk and neglected their business; 
many of their wives and children suffered in want of food and 
clothing, and it seemed to be the beginner or forerunner of al- 
most every bad practice. 

Now brothers, some of your friends, the Quakers, many 
years since were favored to see the mischief that rum and whiskey 
had done, and believed it right for them not to drink any more, 
and have found by more than twenty years' experience that they 
can do better without it than with it. And seeing the mischief 
it did to others, and how much better they themselves did with- 
out, believed it right to persuade others to do so too; and as we 
love our Indian brothers, and seeing their land is much sold and 
white people settling all around them whereby the deer and other 
game is likely to become so scarce that they cannot live by hunt- 
ing much longer, we were drawn in compassion to invite some of 
our young men to come and live amongst you in order to instruct 
you in the itseful ways of the white people who have now been 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family 103 

some time with you. But we understand that some bad white 
men let Indians have whiskey and that many of them love it so 
much that they often get drunk and are wicked. Brothers, we 
wish you would not hearken to those bad men who want }^ou to 
buy their whiskey, nor give way to your own love for it, but 
stand against it and not use any of it; for if you do, your friends, 
the Quakers, will be discouraged and hang down their heads and 
go and leave you. But if you will stand against it and not use 
it, become sober men, they will be willing to assist and instruct 
you what they can." 

I believe the interpreter endeavored to render it into the 
Indian language as well as he could, though he appeared some- 
what convicted; and I also think they understood it pretty well, 
as there appeared a general concurrence by their usual nod and 
sound ou such occasions; and by what the old chief said to us 
after, on our asking them if they had anything to say to us, he 
replied that Henry Simmons had told him some time ago that he 
intended to go home this fall, (Henry having taught school at 
Cornplanter's village), and that he could not give us an answer 
until he knew whether Henry would go or not. 

We then agreed to be a little time by ourselves. They left 
us a few minutes and we laid the matter close to Henry. He 
then told us that he believed it was his duty to come here and he 
now believed it was his place to go home, which we could not 
gainsay, though we felt sorry the Indian children should be left 
without an instructor. The chiefs were called in again, and ten- 
derly informed of Henry's intention of returning. Cornplanter 
then replied if it was right, he could not say against it, but was 
afraid he should not have help enough to keep away the whiskey, 
as Henry had been a great help to him in that, and that he 
thought the Indians would now mind him more than they would 
one of them; and then said that when our young men came first 
amongst them some of their warriors did not like it, but now he 
believed they all liked it, and all spoke very well of them, and 
wished the young men to tell us if any of the young Indians or 
others behaved bad to them. They then all rose up and in a 



104 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

friendly manner shook hands with us and did what they call 
"cover the council fire." Then one of their women brought in 
a large loaf of unleavened wheat bread and a tin cup full of 
pretty good butter, on which we dined and took our departure 
up the river. Halliday Jackson, James Cooper, and myself walk- 
ed, the others all went back in the canoes we came down in. Ar- 
rived at the young men's home just before sunset, and lodged 
this night with them. 

13th. Stayed with our friends and visited several families 
of Indians in their houses and cabins. One, Indian John, has 
built for himself a snug house and kitchen, the logs well hewn 
and the joists and boards planed; with sash and glass windows. 
He has mowed and made two good stacks of hay, fenced in 
several acres of ground in which he has good corn; and several 
others of them are improving their buildings, fences, etc. We 
have fared very well this day on provision well cooked by Halli- 
day Jackson; also walked about and reviewed the improvements 
made by our young friends in this wilderness country, which ap- 
pears considerable. And although I think the spot they settled 
upon is much inferior to many other places in these parts for 
fertility, yet their corn and buckwheat are good; they had pretty 
good oats, have a considerable quantity of hay procured, a large 
garden of good vegetables and have about five acres of ground 
cleared and plowed ready to sow wheat. They have got a com- 
fortable two-story house to live in, and several other necessary 
buildings. 

This day we have had a visit from five or six Indian chiefs 
who stayed with us the most of the day and appeared very much 
pleased in being in our company and viewing a map which we 
had with us. Soon got to understand it so that they could point 
out almost any of the rivers and lakes. About noon Cornplanter* 

*Note.— Cornplanter, at the time of this visit, was about 60 to 65 years 
old. He was of half-blood only, the son of a white man named John O'Bajl, 
a Mohawk Valley trader. He is believed to have been with the French in 
the defeat of Braddock, in 1755, and he afterwards took part with the 
British, in the War of the Revolution. After that, however, he devoted 
himself to peace, and refused to fight. In tge Indian disturbances from 
1791 to 1794, he kept the Senecas friendly, and he continued to live on his 
reservation to his death, in 1836, when he was considered to be about 100 
years old. The accounts of him say that/'he deplored the evils of intem- 
perance, and exerted himself to suppress it." 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 105 

came and brought us a quarter of venison and two pigeons. 
Offered to send some of his people to pilot us to Buffalo, but we 
could not tell him when we could go. About the middle of the 
afternoon they all took an affectionate farewell of us for the 
present. 

Ninth month 19th, 1799. It being likely for a fair day, we 
set off, though the bushes were very wet, and rode to Lake Erie, 
27 miles, and pitched our tent on the margin thereof. 

22d. and first of the week. Stayed and attended their meet- 
ing, which is held in the house of our friend, Asa Schooly, where 
we lodged, which to me was a dull time, though some lively 
communications therein. After dinner I took an affection fare- 
well of Halliday Jackson, who was returned from viewing the 
great Falls and is now about to return through a lonesome wilder- 
ness to Genesinguhta, the place of his present abode. We then 
classed ourselves in order to visit the families in this neighbor- 
hood, Nathan Smith, Jacob Paxson, and James Cooper going in 
one company, and William Blakey, Joshua Sharpies, Thomas 
Stewardson, and myself in another. We then proceeded to and 
visited the families of John Cutle, a member; John Harret, and 
Azariah Schooly. 

1st of the tenth month, 1799. We all attended a conference 
before appointed to be held at Friends' meeting-house in Pelham 
township, otherwise the Short Hills, with the members of said 
meeting and the Friends of Black Creek, which was conducted 
with great solemnity. 

3d. Thomas Stewardson, James Cooper, Jacob Paxson, and 
myself set off, intending for Newark down the Niagara River. • 

7th. Thomas Stewardson, and myself lodged at our kind 
friend, Asa Schooly's, last night, who with his valued wife, 
equipped us for our journey through the wilderness. 

8th. On our way this day w T e met many people moving from 
Bucks county and the Jerseys to Canada. It is amazing what 
numbers of people emigrate from those two places over the 
Niagara river. Where we have pitched our tent there are several 
other fires, at which are several Indians out hunting. They have 
large bundles of skins. This day's ride, forty-one miles. 



106 Geneaology of the Coatcs Family. 

9th. Set off early and rode to Elicot's store-house, thirteen 
miles, having an order from him to get anything ourselves or 
horses stood in need of. This stage almost all the way excellent 
limestone land covered with ash, beech, bass, sugar maple, etc., 
in abundance; a deep soil and not so broken with the rock nor 
yet so dead a level as in some places, and is tolerably well watered 
with livel}' streams. Soon after I set off this morning, my mind 
became serene, which led me into an humble state, and thankful- 
ness and gratitude to Him who hath hitherto preserved me and 
showered down many blessings and favors upon me, ascended 
from my soul, accompanied with strong desires that the rest of 
my time may be favors. This da3''s ride, thirty-six miles, in 
which space we met fifteen or sixteen wagons with families and 
many other people moving to Upper Canada. So great is the 
emigration to that government. 

Tenth month, 12, 1799. On viewing the Lapham's farm 
and things about it, (though he lives in a very poor house) I was 
astonished to see the improvement made in the time; he told me 
it was but four }^ears last spring since he began on it in the 
woods, and now he has more than one hundred acres of land 
fenced in, fields and meadows all in, either with grain or grass, 
and the most of it excellent. Has built a saw-mill and has a 
dairy of cows so good that notwithstanding it hath been an un- 
favorable season, they have made above two thousand lbs. of 
cheese; and yet he appears with his precious wife to be well con- 
cerned Friends, and is free to devote much of his time in the 
service of truth. Truly in this far back settlement in the Gene- 
see county, State of New York, the appearance of things is com- 
fortable, and affords an encouraging hope that if the few Friends 
here settled improve as well and hold up so good a light in a 
religious sense as they do in improving the wilderness country, 
they may yet become as "a city set upon a hill that cannot 
be hid." Stayed all this day with these our valued and kind 
friends; wrote a letter to Jacob Taylor, at Oneida, and walked 
about viewing the improvements Lapham has made. Lodged 



Gencaology of the Coates Family. 107 

another night in his house. In the evening, Caleb Maccumber 
and another friend came to see us, and we spent some time in 
agreeable converse. 

14th. Rode five miles through rich land and new road. 
We came to a great road, and as soon as we entered it we came 
in sight of Canadaigua, a newly settled town containing nearly 
or quite fifty houses. 

18th. I feeling a good deal unhappy on entering a lonesome 
desert, not knowing whether we should meet with any suitable 
place to encamp, and two of our company being infirm. But on 
riding about three miles, we came to a stream of water and there 
fixed things in order for lodging in the woods, which we got 
completed before night; and had a comfortable night under a 
tent made of bushes, by a large fire. My companions said the 
place should be called Camp Coates, which name I have no doubt 
will go by. From Peter's Camp we immediately left the Tiogo 
on our left hand, and ascended a great mountain called the Savage 
Mountain. 

21. Rode from the widow Harris's to Wm. Ellis's, nine miles. 
On the way crossed the Loyalsock. Rested till evening, when 
twelve Friends appointed by Philadelphia Quarter, came to 
Ellis's in order to attend the opening of a new Monthly Meeting 
at Muncy, next Fourth-day, the 23d of this month. Here we 
were lodged, being sixteen of us, they having plenty of room, 
good accommodations, and open, generous hearts. 

23d. Attended the opening of the new Monthly Meeting at 
Muncy, where appears a considerable number of well concerned 
Friends. Said meeting held till near sunset. Lodged this night 
at our kind and hospitable friends, Wm. and Mercy Ellis's. 

24th. Rode from Muncy to Catawissa, thirty miles, and 
lodged at Ellis Hughes's. The most of the way a very good 
road; passed by a number of pretty good plantations though a 
thin soil and a greal deal of what I call poor mountain land, 
covered with barren oaks and small pitch pine. Soon after I 
left Ellis' crossed Muncy Creek, a large stream; and a little be- 



108 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

fore we came to Catawissa town, Fishing Creek, another large 
stream appeared on our left hand and emptied into the northeast 
branch of the Susquehanna, which opposite to said town is about 
a quarter of a mile wide. We rode through it, [it] being a little 
more than belly deep. 

25th. Stayed in the town and walked about with Ellis 
Hughes viewing the river and town, which contains about fifty 
houses, most of them not the most elegant. Near three o'clock, 
afternoon, James Cooper and myself set off, leaving the rest of 
our company who intend to attend the Monthly Meeting at Cata- 
wissa tomorrow, and rode fourteen miles to Lediugburgs, a Dutch 
tavern, the road being good over mountains of very poor land. 

26th. Rode from L,edingburg's to Ricgh's, nine miles; fed 
our horses and got breakfast; to Pensinger's, eighteen miles, and 
dined; to James Star's, at Parvin's, twenty miles, and lodged. 
This day's ride, forty-seven miles. The most of it good road 
over a poor mountain country. Crossed the Schuylkill at a forge 
in a gap of the Blue Mountains, and Maiden Creek, about a mile 
before I came to James Star's. James Cooper having parted 
with me two miles back, in order to go to John Star's, it felt 
very comfortable to be with these my old neighbors and beloved 
friends, James and Eleanor Starr. 

27th. First of the week. James Star accompanied me to 
Reading; attended Friends' meeting in that place, which is very 
small, six miles, and dined at John Jackson's, who accompanied 
me to my son-in-law's, Mark Hughes, seven miles, at Exeter. 
The pleasure I felt in meeting with my children was more sensible 
than easy to describe. 



Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 

Isaac Coates and Rebecca Sharpless, dau. of Benj. of Middle- 
town, b. 10, 29, 1749; d. 2, 9, 1780, UNM., declared their inten- 
tions of marriage 3, 22, 1771, at E. Cain Mtg., but at next Meet- 
ing it was minuted that "the marriage laid before last meeting 
between Coates and Sharpless is put by on account of the man's 



Geneaolcgy of the Coates Family. 109 

indisposition of mind." Although his abberation was but tem- 
porary, they never renewed their engagement. Isaac was a 
Minister in Friends Society and traveled much in that capacity. 

B 2. C 1. D 2. Euzabkth Coates (Aaron, Samuel, Moses) 
M: — John Worley, of York, Pa. Their children: 

E. i. Mary Ann. 2. Jacob. 3. Caleb. 4. Asa. 5. EH. 

B 2. C 1. D3. Moses Coates (Aaron, Samuel, Moses)M: — 
Catherine Howe. Children: 

E. 1. Mary Ann. 2. Jacob. 3. Isaac. 4. Sidney. 5. Rachel. 

B 2. C 2. D 1. Elizabeth Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) 
M: — Jesse Kersey, son of William and Hannah, of York, Pa., 5, 
26, 1790, at East Cain Meeting. J. K. was b. 8, 5, 1768; d. 10, 
20, 1845, at Geo. Martin's home near Unionville, Chester Co., 
Pa., and interred at West Chester, Pa. F.B.G., where his widow 
was interred 9, 9, 1829. Jesse was a noted Minister in Friends 
Society. 

Bradford Mo. Mtg. Marriages, 1737-1864. 

Jesse Kersey of the borough of York, and State of Penn- 
sylvania son of William and Hannah his wife, and Elizabeth 
Coates of East Cain township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Moses Coates and Hannah his wife (the latter de- 
ceased), married 26th, of 5 mo., 1790 at East Cain. Witnesses: 
Wm. Kersey, Hannah Kersey, Moses Coates, Mary Coates, 
Hannah Iddings, Sam. Jones, Isaac Coates, Hannah Coates, 
Moses Mendenhall, Christian Mendenhall, Joshua Mendenhall, 
Lydia Mendenhall, Hannah Coates, Beulah Coates, Joseph Ker- 
sey, Saml. Coates, Abigail Coates, Ann Coates, Isaac Coates and 
others. Their children: 

E. 1. Hannah, b. 2, 29, 1791; d. 4, 2, 1877. 

2. Lydia, b. 11, 24, 1792; d. 12, 24, 1837. 

3. Mary, b. 5, 19, 1795; d. 10, 28, 1816. 

4. Joseph, b. 6, 14, 1797; d. 9, 10, 1827, in Bradford, Pa. 

5. Rachel, b. 1, 29, 1800; 4 d.; d. 11, 11. 1851. 

6. Sarah, b. 11, 13, 1802; 7 d.; d. 9, 23, 1814. 

7. Jesse, Jr., b. 1, 21, 1805, at Mantuaville; 2 d.; 1, 25, 1827. 

8. William, b. 9, 9, 1806; 4 d.; d. 1, 7, 1829, in West Chester, Pa. 



110 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

9. Elizabeth, b. 11, 1, 1809; 4 d.; d. S, 12. 1S20. 

10. Ann, b. 9, 3, 1S12; 4 d.; d. 8, 19, 1820. 

11. Esther E., b. 9, 3, 181 5; 1 d.; d. 3, 4, 1818. 

Several of the children of Elizabeth and Jesse Kersey died of 
consumption. Joseph Kersey, E. 4. M: — Charity Cope. Esther, 
E. 11. M:— Joseph H. Painter, son of Joseph and Lydia (Mar- 
shall) Painter, He, Joseph, was born 10, 5, 18 18, and married 
3, 19, 1840, at Bradford Friends Meeting House. They resided in 
Richmond, Va. 



JESSE KERSEY ON THE DEATH OF HIS WIFE. 

Ah ! whither, sainted spirit, art thou gone, 

And left thy tender spouse all alone ? 

Our time together sweetly passed away, 

While we were partners, each returning day. 

But now, my love, no more can I behold 

Those brilliant eyes that oft thy kindness told. 

No; dearest partner, thy blest race is run, 

And thou art told that all thy work is'done. 

While we were passing through this'world of care, 

How oft thy counsel bid us not dispair. 

When storms and tempests seem'd on every side, 

In thee I found (however greatly tried) 

A mind superior to the darkest"hour, 

Whose trust was firm in the Almighty's power. 

Thy gentle spirit, govern'd by the truth, 

Maintain'd with constancy the vows of youth. 

Nor did thy soul e'er separated stand 

From thy all-wise Creator's blest command. 

But, being faithful to ,( the Light within," 

Was thereby kept from each besetting sin. 

And having known a heart that was sincere, 

Thy end was peace, — thy future prospects clear. 

Thus pass'd the partner of my life away, 

The blessed subject of eternal day. 

No sorrows, griefs, nor clouds of dark despair, 

But joy and peace forever centre there. 

Oh may her offspring, guided as she was, 

By principles Divine, and holy laws, 

Enjoy with her the pure reward^of peace, 



Geneaology oj the Coates Family. Ill 

Nor from the beauty of her life e'er cease. 

Then will they ever prove themselves to be 

Examples from all vice and folly free, 

Thus wisely meeting ev'ry task assign'd, 

In ev'ry trial they will be resign'd. 

And when their race on earth shall have an end, 

Jehovah, God, will be their lasting Friend. 



B 2. C 2. D 2. Hannah Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) 
M: — Gravenor Marsh. Children: 
E. i. A daughter, died young. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-1 Isaac Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — 
Mary Gilbert, 4, 30, 1801 at E. Cain, dau. of John and Ann 
(Stackhouse) Gilbert, of West Cain, Pa., who was b. 12, 27, 1774. 
Isaac Coates was buried at Deer Creek, Stark Co., Ohio. 

From Bradford M. M. Records: 

Isaac Coates, son of Moses Coates and Mary, his wife, of 
the township of East Cain in the County of Chester, and State 
of Pa., and Mary Gilbert, daughter of John Gilbert and Ann, 
his wife, of the township of West Cain, County and State afore- 
said, married 30, 4, 1801, at Cain. Witnesses: Moses Coates, 
Mary Coates, Isaac Coates, Sarah Coates, Elizabeth Kersey, 
Jesse Kersey, Seymour Coates, Becky Coates, Esther Coates, 
Rachel Gilbert, Warrick Coates, Caleb Coates/ Isaac Gilbert, 
Elizabeth Gilbert, Benjamin Gilbert, Thomas Gilbert and others. 
Children: 

E. i. Ann Gilbert, b. 4, 17, 1802. M: — Dr. Thomas Shreve. 

2. Elisha, b. 3, 24, 1804; d. 4, 1, 1806. 

3. John Gilbert, b. 7, 6, 1807. 

4. Rachel, b. 7, 9. 1809. M*. — Dr. Solomon Shreve. 

5. Sarah Clark, b. 11, 17, 181 1. M:~ 

6. Isaac Stackhouse, b. 9, 20, 1S14; d. 8, 7, 1816. 

7. Esther Ridgeway, b. 3, 27, 1817. M: — William Richmond, 2,29, 

1844. Children: F. 1. Charles Linden, b. 12, 4, 1834. 2. 
Victor Hugo, died. Int. Deer Creek, Ohio. 



112 Gencaology of the Coates Family. 

8, Isaac Gilbert Coates, b. 9, 13, 1819; d. 12, 19, 1902, at res. of 
son-in-law,Dr. William H. Mattson, Chester Heights, Del. Co.* 
Pa. M: — Emma S. (Pierce) Morris, 11, 3,1852. Isaac was 
born in Coatesville, Pa., removed with his parents in infancy 
to Stark Co., Ohio, where he resided most of his life, a lifelong 
member of Religious Society of Friends, and a staunch 
worker in the anti-slavery cause. Their children: F. 1. Ida 
Florence, b. o, 27, 1856. M: — Dr. William H. Mattson, 5, 5, 
1875, of Concord, Pa., son of Peter Worrall and Evalina Han- 
num. Children: G. 1. Gilbert Worrall, b. 2, 3, 1876. M: — 
Lydia Booth, dau. of Samuel and Matilda, 7, 18, 1899. Chil- 
dren: H. 1. Dorothy Coates, b. 4, 16, 1900. 2. Gilbert Booth, 
b. 2, 23, 1903. 2. Harry H., b. 7, 28, 1879. M:— 5. 5, 1894, 
Amelia Honnann, dau. of August and Josephine. Child: H. 
1. Evalina, b. 8, 7, 1905. 3- Levi L., b. 6, 4, 1SS1. M: — 
12, 18, 1902, Mabel Brinton, dau. of John and Sarah. Children: 
H. 1. Helen Florence, b. 3, 16, 1904. 2. Grace Brinton, b. 6, 
26, 1905. 4. Norman Barnard, b. 2, 16, 1883. 5. Francis 
Coates, b. 11, 16, 1884. F. 2. Margaret Emma Coates, b. 8. 
24, 1861. M: — William H. Yerkes, 2, 14, 1903, son Morris and 
Hannah. Res., at old Coates homestead. P. O., Limaville, 
Stark, Co., Ohio. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-2 Ann Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — 
John Way, son of Benj. and Mary, 3, 24, 1796. 

From Bradford M. M. Records: 

10, 14, 1796. Ann (Way) Coates complained of for marry- 
ing out and. not a member. Their children: 

E. 1. Benjamin, b. 6, 15, 1800; d. 10, 20, 1826. 

2. Mary, 8, 26, 1802; d. 2, 5, 1824. 

3. Moses Coates, 

4. John Baldwin, twins, b. 9, 29, 1804; d. 8, 6, 1832. 

5. Matilda, b. 9, 29, 1S06. 

6. Joseph R., b. 10, 18, 1S10. 

B 2. C 2. D2-3 Calkb Coates (Samuel, Samuel, Moses)M: 
—3, 15, 1810, Elizabeth Gilbert, at Fallowfield Meeting. He b. 
1, 9, 1790. Their children: 

E. 1. Ann Lucretia, b. 4, 3, 181 1. 

2. Edwin Howard, b. 2, 15, 1813. 

3. Dr. John Gilbert, b. 4, 8, 1815, at Coatesville, Pa.; d. 1, 18, 1862, 

at Culpepper Court House, Va., int. at Big Lick, Rhoanoke 
Co., Va., on 20th inst. Died of Pneumonia. 



Gencaology of the Coates Family. 113 

4. Isaac Stackhouse, b. i, 20, 1S1S; d. 5, 19, 1818. 

5. Charles Stone, b. d. 7, 3, 1837, after a painful illness of 8 

days. 

6. William Bailey, b. 7, 12, 1S23. 

7. Esther Virginia, b. 2, 24, 1S27. 

8. Lewis Montgomery, b. 4, 29, 1S29. M:— Mary E. Dull, 7, 19, 

1S60. No issue, 

9. Elmer Ruan, b. 9, 15, 1S31; d. 10, 24, 1889, in Phila., Pa. M: — 

Elizabeth Phillips Bonnell. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-4 Esther Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: 
9, 1, 1803, at Cain Meeting, Joseph Ridgeway. 

From Bradford M. M. Records: 

Joseph Ridgeway, of the city of Phila., in the State of Pa., 
son of Henry, of County of Burlington in the State of New Jersey, 
deceased, and Hannah his wife, and Esther Coates, dan. of 
Moses Coates and Mary his wife, in the County of Chester and 
State of Pa., married 21, 9, 1803 at East Cain. Witnesses: 
Moses Coates, Mary Coates, Hannah Harlan, Jesse Kersey, 
Elizabeth Kersey, Isaac Coates, Jun., Sarah Coates, Caleb Coates, 
Moses Coates, Junr., Aquilla Coates, Amos Coates, Samuel 
Coates, Rebecca Coates, Rebecca Ridgeway, Mary Ridgeway, 
Hannah Ridgeway, Eliza Gilbert, Jesse Coates, Aaron Coates, 
Isaac Gilbert and others. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-8 Moses Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: 
Lydia Taylor, 8, 4, 1829. L. T. b. 7, 25, 1807. Children: 
E. 1. Ann Eliza, b. 6, 6, 1830. 

2. Moses Aquilla, b. 2, 3, 1833; d. 2, 4, 1833. 

3. Isaac, M.D., b. 3, i7, 1834. 

4. Joseph Ridgeway, b. 6, 24, 1837. 

5. Jesse Aquilla, b. 11, 21, 1838; d. 5, 18, 1S61. 

6. Amos Aquilla, b. 5, 8, 1S43; d. 9, 26, 1S61. Was Hospital Ser- 

geant 1st Penna. Reserves, died unmarried at Tennellytown 
Md., while in U.S. service. ( 

B 2. C 2. D 2-9 Aouiixa Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) 
M:— 10, 2, 1823, Hannah S. Troth, b. 10, 9, 1791, dau. of Henry 
and Hannah, of Brownsville, Pa. Died, 11, 6, 1862. He was 
int. at Deer Creek, Stark Co., Ohio. Children: 



114 Geneaology of the Coates Family, 

E. i. Sarah Jane, b. 9, 17, 1S25. M: — Samuel Ware, son of John and 
Sarah, 10, 24, 1844. Children: F. 1. Emmalise, b. 8, 1, 1846. 
M: — John Gilman, 6, 15, 1867. 

2. Rosella, b. 10, 28, 1849. M: — Joseph Myerson, 12, 21, 1S70. 

3. Valeria, b. 9, 20, 1852. 

4. Laurence Kansas, b. 10, 5, 1855. 

5. Lloyd Garrison, b. 6, 4, 1S59. 

6. Theodore, b. 2, 22, 1863; d. 6, 1, 1873. 

At Redstone Monthly Meeting held 9, 3, 1823. Aquilla 
Coates and Hannah S. Troth, informed this Meeting, in writing, 
of their intention of marriage with each other, he is expected to 
produce a Certificate from his Monthly Meeting of his clearness 
from others on like engagements. 

At Redstone Monthly Meeting held 19, 1, 1823. Aquilla 
Coates produced a Certificate from Marlborough Monthly Meeting 
in order to proceed in marriage with Hannah S. Troth, they now 
attending, declared the continuation of their intention of marriage, 
their parents consenting, and nothing appearing to obstruct, 
they are left at liberty to accomplish their marriage agreeable to 
discipline, Morris Truman and John Cock, are appointed to have 
the oversight thereof. At next Meeting the committe reported 
the marriage of Aquilla Coates and Hannah S. Troth was orderly 
accomplished. 

Taken from the Marriage Certificate. 

Whereas, Aquilla Coates, of Stark County, in the State of 
Ohio, son of Moses and Mary Coates, the former deceased, and 
Hannah S. Troth, of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Henry and Hannah Troth, the former deceased, having de- 
clared their intention of marriage with each other before a 
Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, held at 
Redstone, were married the 2nd day of the 10th month, 1823, in 
a public meeting of the said people at Redstone. 

Aquilla Coates. 
Hannah S. Coates. 

Witnesses: Hannah Troth, Sarah T. Oxley, James Truman, 
Margaret Trumau, Jane Troth, Joel Oxley, Ann G. Coates, John 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 115 

Coates, Edith N. Sharpless, Hannah G. Lamb, Erastus Kirk, 
Joseph Truman, William Sharpless, Atlantic Haines, Rhoda M. 
Hunt, Susan A. Jones, Sarah Moore, Ann C. Townsend, Ruth 
Townsend, David Cattell, Joshua Wood, Ruth Haines, Richard 
Darlington, Elizabeth Cattell, Jonas Cattell. 

Taken from Certificates of Removal of Redstone Monthly 
Meeting: 

To Marlborough Monthly Meeting, Ohio. Hannah S. 
Coates, having removed with her husband, to reside within 
the limits of your Meeting, requests our Certificate, nothing ap- 
pearing to prevent, we grant the same, signed at Redstone 
Monthly Meeting, 12th month, 3rd, 1823, By 

Elisha Hunt. 
Rachel Darlington. 
B 2. C 2. D 2-10 Amos Coates (Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: 
Jane Brinton, b. 3, 23, 1800. Children: 

E. i. Moses, b. 8, 30, 1S19. M: — Mary A. Young. Children: F. 1. 
William, b. 1S44. 2. Mary Amelia, b. 1846. 3. W., b. 1850.. 
4. Geo. S., b. 1855. 

2. Norris B., b. 10, 25, 1820. M: — A.Rudolph. Children: F. 1. 

Sylvanus, b. 1845. 2. Moses, b. 1849. 3. Emeline, b. 1852. 

3. Hannah, B. N., b. 9, 15, 1823. M: — Joseph Arnold, who died, 

4, 1861. Children: F. 1. James M. 2. Belle. 3. Florence. 
4. Gertrude. 

4. Harriett T., b. 6, 5, 1S24; d. at 10 months. 

5. Hayes Clark, b. 6, 9, 1826. M: — Amelia Ware. Children: F* 

r. Albert, b. 1847. 2. Phebe, b. 1850. 3. Laura, b. 1S55. 

6. Jesse Kersey, b. 4, 25, 1828. M: — Virginia Brown. Children: 

F. 1. John, b. 1852. 2. Elmer, b. 1854. 3. Mariah, b. 1856. 
4. Clifford, b. 1858. 

Note: — I have examined the names of witnesses to marriage Certifi- 
cates for Redstone Monthly Meeting, do not find Coates, this would appear 
to be evidence that the fanily were settled to the west of Redstone, or 
Fayette County, Penn., possibly in Ohio, and lodged their Certificates at Red- 
stone. I have examined my Westland Monthly Meeting Records in Wash- 
ington Co., Penn., do not find the name of Coates, nor does the name ap- 
pear as witness to any of marriage certificates. I have also examined my 
Crane Creek and Caesars Creek records, no Coates is recorded, possibly 
this record does not cover that part of Carolina, in which Coates' were 
located. Kirk Brown. 



116 Ge?ieaoIogy of the Coates Family. 

7. George B. N., b. 8, 23, 1829. M:— Mary Black. Children: F. 

1. Jane, b. 1S52. 2. Harriett, b. 1854. 

8. Oliver Ridgeway, b. 12, 8,1831. M:— Catharine Lane. Children: 

F. 1. Edwin O. R., d. 4, 5, 1S63, at Lexington, Ky., int. Marl- 
boro, Stark Co., Ohio. 

9. Amos, b. 3, 24, 1835. M: — Ada F. Frees. Child: F. 1. Horace 

Lucian, b. i860. 

10. Mary Ann, b. 6, 1, 1826. M: — Joseph C. Warren. 

11. Howard Hill, b. 1838. M:— Cordelia Hall. Child: F. 1. Son 

b. i860. 

12. Ridgeway, b. 1840. UNM. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11 Jksse Coates, M.D. (Moses, Samuel, 
Moses) M: — Martha Webb Pennock, by Friends Ceremony, in 
presence of Mayor Joseph Watson of Philadelphia, 4, 4, 1826. 
Their children: 

F. 1. George W. P., b. 1, 30, 1828. 

2. Charles E., M.D., b. io, 10, 1829; d. 3, 1901, in Texas, at home 

of a son. 

3. Ann Eliza, b. 9, 1, 1831; d. 1831. 

4. Sarah Pennock, 

5. Isaac Pennock, b, 10, 16, 1836. 

6. Caroline Pennock, 

Sarah and Caroline reside (1906) in their father's homestead 
on Main St., Coatesville, Pa. 

B 2. C 3. D 1. Beulah Coates (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: 
Joshua Moore, of Cain, b. 5, 18, 1803. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 

Joshua Moore, of Township of London Grove, in the County 
of Chester and State of Penna. , son of Joseph Moore and Jane 
his wife, the latter deceased, and Beulah Coates, daughter of 
Isaac and Hannah his wife, of the township of East Cain * * 
married 18, 5, 1803, at Cain. Witnesses: Isaac Coates, Hannah 
Coates, Grace Colgan, Lydia Hughes, Rebecca Coates, Seymour 
Coates, Amy Coates, Zilla Coates, Israel Coates, Willy Coates, 
William Moore, David Moore, Diannah Moore, Mary Coates, 
Junr., Isaac Coates, Junr., William Moore. Samuel Coates, Junr., 
Caleb Coates, Levi Coates, and others. Their children: 

E. 1. Joseph, b. 5, 4, 1804. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family, 117 

2. Hannah, b. 5, 25, 1807; d. 9, n, 1849. 

3. Isaac, b. 3, 21, 1S10; d. .6, 29, 1S71. 

4. Jane, b. 5, 1, 1812. 

5. Lydia, b. 10, 24, 1S1S; d. 11, 23, 1844. 

Beulah was int. at Old West Grove F.B.G. 

B 2. C 3. D 2. Grace Coatks (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: 
William Colgan. 

From Bradford M. Mtg., 2, 14, 1794. Complained of for 
marrying out — an elopement. 

Disowned, 5, 16, 1794. 

Cain Mtg. Ack. accepted 9, 15, 1797. Their children. 
E. 1. Hannah, M: — -Win. Gray. 2. Zilla. 3. John. 

B 2. C 3. D 4. Lydia Coates (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — 
Mark Hughes, 12, 20, 1797, at East Cain Meeting, son of Samuel 
and Margaret of Exeter M. Mtg., Berks Co., Pa. 
From Bradford M. Mtg. : 

Mark Hughes of township of Exeter in the County of Berks 
and State of Penna., son of late Samuel and Margaret his wife, 
both decased, and Lydia Coates of East Cain township in the 
County of Chester, and State of Penna., daughter of Isaac Coates 
and Hannah his wife, married 20, 12; 1797, at East Cain. Wit- 
nesses: Isaac Coates, Hannah Coates, Thomas Hughes, Thos. 
Stalker, Isaac Coates, Saml. Hughes, Lydia Hughes, Zilla Coates, 
Beulah Coates, Seymour Coates, and others. Their children: 

E. 1. Beulah, b. 3, 27, 1802. d.2,2, 18S2. M:— Daniel Thompson, b. 3, 13, 
1S01; d. 7, 17) 1868. Children: F. 1. Joel, M:— Cornelia Gillespie. 
Children: G. 1. Alfred, b. 12, 7, 1852; d. 2, 5, 1861. 2. Annie, 
b. 10, 6, 1856. M: — Wm. A. Boone, have several children. 3. 
Beulah, UNM. 4. Hannah, b. 3, 26, 1865. M:— Jack Pilling. 
5. Daniel, b. 10, 8, 1866. 6. N. Roland, b. S, 25, 1871. F. 2 
Lydia, b. 7, 13, 1828. M: — Owen Evans. Children: G. 1. Mary 
R., b. 3, 9, 1859. M:— Chas. Mitchell. 2. Beulah, T., b. 10, 
26, i860. M:— Alfred Moon. 3. Edwin, b. 9, 4, 1862; d. UNM. 
4. William, b. 4, 12, 1867. Lydia was a Minister in the Society 
of Friends. F. 3. Elizabeth. No records. F.4. Hannah. M: — J. 
Borton Hayes. Children: G. 1. Catharine W., b. n, 1, 1851. 
M:— Chas. Forsythe. Children: H. 1. Albert, b. 1888. 2. 
Sarah, b. 1891. 3. William L., b. 1893. G. 2. William B., b. 



118 Gcneaology of the Coates Family. 

3, io, ]86o. M: — Ella Lamborn; one son. 3. Lydia E., b. 10, 
1 1863. M:— Alfred Leeds. Res., Moorestown, N.J. 4. Al- 
bert L., b. 12, 23, 1867, d. 5. Mary B., b. n, i, i873. 
E. 2. Hannah Hughes, (H. H. L., d. 5, 5, 1S45.) M:— John Lam 
born, 3, 13, 1845, son of Thomas, of New Garden Township, 
Chester Co., Pa. Children: F. 1. Beulah, b. 1, 12, 1836; d. 
i2, 14, 1842. 2. William, b. 4, 21, 1838. M:— Mary C. Law- 
ton, dau. of Jas. M., of New Brighten, Mass., 8, 16, 1S70. Child- 
ren: G. I. Annie, b. 6, 20, 1S71. 2. Edith, b. 10,21, 1872; d. 
7, 2, 1S73. 3. Sarah, b. 6, 22, 1874. 4. Katharine, b. 
2, 20, 1876. M: — 8, 1, 1S95, Capt, Tenny Ross, son of Commis- 
sioner John \V,, of Washington, D.C. Children: H. 1. Ross. 
2. Lewis Tenny. 3. Mary Elizabeth. G, 5. Charles Car- 
rington, b. 2, 24, 1878. M:— 6, 3, 1903, Fannie D. Bache, dau. 
of Arthur J., of Washington, D.C. Children: H. 1. Lawton. 
2. Charles Frances. G. 6. Mabel Lawton, b. 1, io, 1S81. M: 
6, 13, 1900, Emory H. Wilson, of Washington, D.C. Win. 
Lamborn served three years, lacking one and a half months, in 
the Civil War, 1862-65, for the suppression of the Rebellion 
and the Abolition of Slavery, Since which time he has been 
employed continuously in the Treasury Dept., at Washington, 
D.C. F. 3. Phebe H.,b. 9, 7, 1840; d.8, 15, 1S77. 4. Hughes, 
b. 6, 2, 1844. M:— 5, iS, 1S78, Ora A., dau. of Hiram W. and 
Sarah B. Barney, of Denver, Col. Children: G. 1. Era May, 
b. 5, 15, 1879. M:— Clyde White, of Denver, Col. 2. William 
Hughes, b. 12, 17, 1884. 3. Sarah H., b. 12, 17, 1884. Twins. 

3. Rebecca, b. s, 23, r8n. M:— John D. Harvey. Children: F: 

1. Samuel. 2. Lydia. 3. Mary. M:— Geo. McClain. Children 
G. 1. Mabel. 2. Leona. Res., Germantown, Pa. 

4. Samuel, b. 6. 1, 1809; d. 2, 26, 1854. M:— Mary Ann Harvey. 

Child: F. 1. Lydia, b. 8, 21, 1S39. M:— Alfred F. Conrad, 
b. 2, 13, 1835, rose grower, West Grove, Pa., where they re- 
side. No children. F. 2. Mark, b. 2, 15, 1844. M:— Priscilla 
Hoopes. Children: G. 1. Mary. M:— William Ewing, M.D. 
of West Grove, Pa., where they reside. Child: H. 1. Mar- 
garet H. G. 2. Lydia. 3. Alice. F. 3. Hannah. M: — Ed- 
ward Savery. Res. West Chester, Pa. Children: G. 1. Mary. 

2. Rebecca. 3. Edward. F. 4. Rebecca. M:— Chas. Taylor. 
Children: G. 1. Merritt 2. Clifford. 3. Joseph. 4. Mary. 
5. Raymond. 

5. Margaretta, b. 11, 18, 1813; d. 9, 7, 1836. M:— Thomas Taylor, 

of West Chester, Pa. 



Genealogy of the Coatr.s Family, 119 

E. 6. William, b. 4,10,1819; d. 5,12, 1S94. M:— Elizabeth Gawthrop, 
b. 2, 15, 1820; d. 12, 31, 1897. Children: F. 1. George G., b. 
9, 21, 1843. M:— Emma Hall. No issue. 2. Charles Coates, b. 

1, 19, 1847. M: — Caroline Barton. Children: G. 1. Laura, b. 

2, 25, 1873. 2 - Ma Y> t>. 8, 5, 18S0. 3. Charles R., b. 1, 16, 1887- 

F. 3. Amie A., b. 5, 20, 1850. M:— Milton E. Conard, V.M,D- 
b. 6, 6, 1 85 1. M:— 10, 8, 1S73. Graduated at Veternary Dept. 
University of Pennsylvania, Class of 1891. Their childrenn: 

G. 1. Elizabeth H. 2. Alice M. Res., West Grove, Pa. 

B 2. C 3. D 7. Rebecca Coates (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: 
John Woodward, 1, 16; 1805, at East Cain. He born, 5, 22, 
1775, died 11, 5, 1843, int. at West Grove F.B.G. No issue. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 

John Woodward, of London Grove Township in County of 
Chester and State of Penna., son of Samuel Woodward and Sarah 
(Jackson) his wife, (the latter deceased), and Rebecca Coates, 
of the township of East Cain and County and State aforesaid, 
married 16, 1, 1805. Witnesses: Samuel Woodward, Isaac 
Coates, Hannah Coates, Samuel Woodward, Junr., Benjamin 
Swayne, Joshua Moore, Thomas Woodward, Seymour Coates, 
Amy Coates, Zilla Coates, Mark Hughes, Lindley Coates, Rachel 
Woodward, Lydia Jackson, Israel Coates, William Woodward, 
Sarah Coates and others. 

B 2. C 3. D 5. Seymour Coates (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: 
Deborah Preston, at West Grove, Pa., 4, 19, 1805. Their chil- 
dren: 

E. 1. Preston, b. 1, 3, 1806; d. 1S40. M:— Mary A. Baker, b. 1S10; d. 
185S. Children: F. 1. Isaac P., b. 6, 26, 1830; d. Io, 16, 1S86. 2. 
James S., b. 1834. M:— Caroline Miller. Children: G. 1. Mary 
C,b. 1857. 2. Seymour, b. 1859. 3. Amelia. M: — Isaac Gass. 
Children: H. 1. Isaac, b. u, 1, 1830. Res., Kansas City, Mo. 

2. Isaac, b. 9, 9, 1S09. M: — Sarah A. Richards. Children: F. 1. 

Phebe R. 2. Rebecca. 3. Joshua R. 

3. Rebecca, b. 12, 19, 1812; d. 10, 5, 1846. M:— Alfred Sinkler. 

Had 4 children. 

4. Hannah, i b. 9, 20, 1S15; d. 12, 23, 1S43. M:— Abel L. Childs. 

Son: F. 1. Henry Preston. M: — Lillian Price. No issue. 
Rebecca resides No. 3627 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 



120 Geneaology of the Coates\Family. 

5. Lydian, b. 8, 18, 181 S; d. 12, 8, 1S99. M: — Lukins Michenor 

Children: F. 1. Frank. 2. Mary. M:— McCalvey, Res.' 

(1905) 1316 Olive St., Kansas City, Mo. 3. Irene. 

6. Rachel, b. 11, 12, 1821. M: — Erie Locke, of Indianaplis, Ind. 
Two sons and one daughter, latter resides in California (1905). 

B 2. C 3. D 6. Amy Coates (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — 
Mahlon Preston, 11, 20, 1805, of E. Cain Mtg. son of Thomas 
and Rebecca of London Grove, Pa. Their children: 

E. 1. William, b. 11, 6, 181 1; d. 2, 20, 18S6. William was at one time 
City Treasurer of Wilmington, Del., and served as Quarter 
Master at Fort Delaware during the Civil War. 

Extracted from Bradford Mo. Meeting Marriage Records: 
"Mahlon Preston, of Township of London Grove, in County 
of Chester and State of Penna., son of Joseph Preston and 
Rebecca his wife, the latter deceased, and Amy Coates of the 
Township of East Calu, in the County and State aforesaid, 
daughter of Isaac and Hannah his wife, married 20th of 11 Mo. 
1805, at Cain." Witnesses: — Joseph Preston, Hannah Coates, 
William Preston, Jonas Preston, David Preston, Judith Preston, 
Seymore Coates, Deborah Coates, Zilla Coates, Amos Preston, 
Sidney Coates, Israel Coates, Beulah Moore, Joshua Moore, 
William M. Colgan, Moses Coates, Joshua Mendenhall, William 
Truman, Rachel Moore, and others. 

B 2. C 3. D 7. Zixla Coatks (Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M:— 
James Williamson. Children: 

E. 1. Hannah. 2. Seymour. 3, Rachel, died young. 4. Lindley, 
died UNM. 5. Gilpin. 6. Elwood. 7. Taylor. S. Beulah. 
9. Amy, died young and of smallpox. From E 3, to E 8, in- 
clusive, died of consumption. 

B 2. C 3. D 8. Israkl Coatks (Isaac, Samuel, jFMoses) M: — 
Sarah Williamson, at West Grove, Pa., 12, 16, 1819. Their 
children: 

E. 1. Isaac. 2. Lewis. 3. Rachel. M: — Richard Amicost. 4. Louisa 
M:— Cox. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. LindlKy Coatks (Isaac,jSamuel,|Moses)|M:. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 121 

Deborah Simmons, at West Grove, Pa., 12, 16, 1819. Their 
children: 

E. i. Simmons, b. killed io, 2, 1862, on his farm near West 

Grove, Pa., from overturning of an ox-cart. 

2. Kersey, b. 9, 15, 1S23; d. 4, 24, 1SS7, in Kansas City, Mo. 

3. Comley, a mute. 

Generation E Children of D. 

B 2. C 1. D 3. E 1. Mary Ann Coates (Aaron, Samuel, 
Moses). Certificate from York M. M. held 7th of 6th mo., 1815, 
to Redstone M. M. held 11th of 7th mo., 1815, and accepted. 

B 2. C 1. D 3. E 2 and 3, Jacob and Isaac Coates (Aaron, 
Samuel, Moses). No record. 

B 2. C 1. D 3. E. 4. Sidnay Coates (Arron, Samuel, 
Moses) A Certificate from York M. M. dated 7th of 6th month, 
1815, to Redstone M. M. held 1st of 9th mo., 1815, and accepted. 
(Redstone M. M. was in Fayette Co., Pa.) Sidney Coates was 
born 2, 6, 1777. 

B 2. C 1. D 3. E 5. Rachel Coates (Aaron, Samuel, 
Moses). A Certificate from York M. M. 7th of 9th mo., 1814, 
to Redstone M. M. held 2nd of 12th month, 1814, and accepted. 

B 2. C 2. D 1. E 1. Hannah Kersey (Elizabeth, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — 1st husband, Ezra Cope (his first wife was 
Sarah Taylor), 9, 18, 1816, at Downington, Pa. Their children: 

F. 1. Sarah, b. 3, 26, 1S18. M:— Dr. Bracken. 

2, Elizabeth, b. n, 26, 1819; died UNM. 

3. Oliver, b. 1, 11, 1S24. M: — Hannah Gilbreath. 

Ezra Cope sold his farm in East Bradford and moved to West 
Chester, Pa., but afterward moved to Columbia Co., Ohio, with 
his wife and younger chiidren. After his death, his widow mar- 
ried Benjamin Hanna, grandfather of Markus A. Hanna, late 
U.S. Senator from Ohio. Benj. Hanna was a Friend, and for 
two or three generations back were also Friends. Markus A. 
Hanna was not a member of any Religious body but was often 
called "the Quaker Senator." And afterward Hannah married 
Stephen Fish, of Mo. 



122 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

B2. C2. D2-1.E 1. Ann Gilbert Coates (Isaac, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M:— Dr. Thomas Shreve. Their children: 
F, i. Charles Ridgeway, b. 6, 26, 1829. 

2. Julia Atwater, b. 4, 30, 1831. 

3. Caster Wister, b. 1, 30, 1833. 

B 2. C 2. D 3-1. E 3. John Gilbert Coates (Isaac, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Arm Savryer. Children: 

F. 1. Cullen Wister, b. 1843. M:— Mary Rose. Children: G. 1. 
Walter. 2. Mary, b. 9, 16, 1875. 
2. Cecelia Mary, b. 1S49, always known as Mary. M: — Dr. Albert 
Rogers. Child: G. 1. George. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 1. Ann Lucretia Coates (Caleb, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Col. John A. Rogers, ofTenn. Their chil- 
dren: 

F. 1. Lucretia Adelia Clay, b. 5, 25, 1843, in Catawba, Dallas Co., 
Alabama; d. 9, 7, 1843, in Nashville, Tenn. 

2. Virginia Sylvania, b. 8, 24, 1844. 

3. Charles Watrus, b. 6, 11, 1846. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 2. Edward Howard Coates (Caleb, 
Moses, Samuel, Moses) M:— Sarah Dull, 10, 12, 1834. Their 
children : 

F. I. Henry Ridgeway, b. 8, 6, 1835. 

2. Isabella Virginia, b. 6, 13, 1837 M: — Samuel Thompson, by 

Friend's Ceremony. Children: G. 1. Walter, died young. 2 
Frank, UNM., resides 3142 Page St., Phila. Pa. 

3. Helen Garrison, b. 9, 12, 1839. M: — Shreve. Child: G. 1 

Forest, Res., Easton, Talbot Co., Md. 

4. William Taylor, b. 3, 22, 1841. M: — Hannah. Child: 

G. 1. Hannah, married. Res., 2120 North Carolina Ave., 
Phila, Pa. 

5. Elizabeth Gilbert, b. 4, 17, 1843. Res., 3142 Page St., Phila., Pa. 

6. Ann Lucretia, b. 1, 23, 1846. Res., 3142 Page St., Phila., Pa. 

7. Edwin Howard, Jr., b. 2, 19, 1848, Res., 1337 Brown St., Phila., 

Pa. 

8. Ida Valeria, b. 10, i7,"iS5o. M: — Wrightman. Children: 

G. 1. Winfield, married, one child. 2. Kate, married. 3. 
Laura, died young. Res., Strand P. O. Box, 101, Lincoln Co., 
Oklahoma. 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 123 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 3. Dr. John Gilbert Coates (Caleb, 
Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Emiline Valentine. Children: 
F. I Charles F., b. S 7 I, 1S41; d. 11, 19, 1841. 

2. John G., b. 10, 17, 1842; d. 12, 9, 1842. 

3. Thomas H., b. 10, 13, 1843; d. 11, 22, 1843. 

4. Emma Virginia, b. 12, 6, 1844; d. 1, 12, 1845. 

5. Jas. Watts, b. 7, 28, 1846. Int. at Big Lick, Va. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 7. Esther Virginia Coates (Caleb, 
Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Richard Mather, of Bucks Co., Pa. 
Their children: 

F. 1. Lewis Montgomery, b. 9, 11, 1847. 

2. Benjamin Franklin, b. 12, 29, 1848; d. 1, 24, 1857. 

3. Charles Elmer, b. 2, 18, 1850. 

4. Florence Virginia, b. 6, 19, 1852. 

5. Irene Adelaide, b. 2, 13, 1859, in Burlington, N.J. 

6. Elenor Mary. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-8 E 1. Ann Eliza Coates (Moses, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M:— Charles J. Morton, M.D.,of Chester, Pa., 
13, 17, 1860, a lineal descendant of John Morton, the singer. 
Their children: 

F. 1. Rus*h Kersey, M.D., b. 10, 20, 1861. M:— Caroline Louisa Wil- 
son, of Phila., Pa., 11, 23, 1902. He graduated at College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, Bait., Md. Res., 316 Clifton Ave., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

2. Mary W., b. 5, 17, 1864. Res., Lead City, S. Dakota. UNM. 

3. Charles Lomens, b. 2, 27, 1866, deceased. 

4. Howard M., M.D., b. 5, 23, 1868. M:— Lucretia Yale Jarvis.. of 

Phila., Pa., 12, 9, 1891. Graduated at U. of P. Rush and 
Howard were students at Lafayette College. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-8. E 3. Isaac Taylor Coates (Moses, Moses, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Mary Penn Gaskill. Their children: 

F. 1. Harold Penn Gaskill, b. 2, 26, 1868. M:— Florence Elizabeth 
Jarvis, of Phila,, Pa., 7, 2, 1891. Their children: G. 1. Rosa- 
lent Jarvis Penn Gaskill, b. 3, 14, 189 . 2. Lucretia Yale Mor- 
ton, b. 11, 20, 1902. Res., in St. Louis, Mo. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-8. E 4. Joseph Ridgkway Taylor Coates, 
Atty. (Moses, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Mary Darlington, 
b. 5, 23, 1844. M: Chester, Pa., 4, 10, 1862. Their children: 

F. 1. Mary Darlington, b. 2, 27, 1865. 



124 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

i. Harry Darlington, b. 9, 2S, 1872. M: — 11, 23, 1904, Jennie Walk. 

er Hall, granddaughter of Lord Shelmarden. H. D. C. is 1st 

Sergt., in 1st Reg., U.S.V. Engineers. Saw service in Porto 

Rico in 189S, 
3-4. Edith and Emily, (twins), died in infancy. 
5. Florence, b. 4, 7, 1S96. M:— 4, 2$, 1905, Rapelize Howell, of N.Y 

City. 

Joseph Ridgeway Taylor Coates, was born in Coatesville, had 
an Acedemic education, studied Law, was admitted to the Dela- 
ware Bar in 1859, entered the Army in 1861 as 1st Lieutenant of 
the (Slifer Phalanx) Co. C, of the 1st Regt. of Penn Reserves? 
was promoted to Captain and breveted Major for gallant conduct 
in the Gettysburg Campaign. 

Served as Assistant Inspector General on Staff of Gen. Mc- 
Candless, Commanding the 1st Brigade of the Penna. Reserves 
(3d Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac) and hon- 
orably mustered out of service, June 15, 1864, after expiration of 
service. 

Was appointed Postmaster of Chester in 1865 to 1S69. In 1SS7 
was elected Mayor of Chester, and again in 1890. Was an Elec- 
tor on the Harrison ticket, and still continues the practice of 
law. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 1. George William Pennock Coates 
(Jesse, M.D., Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Rachel E. Hazard, of 
Milford, Del., granddaughter of Ex-Governor Hazard. Their 
children : 

F. 1. Rachel D., died at 18 years. Known as "Shelly." 
2. Jesse, died at 9 months. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11 E 2. Charles Howard Coates, M.D. 
(Jesse, M.D., Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Annie Hunter Rob- 
erts, of Nantmeal, Pa. C. H. C. was born in Coatesville, Pa. 
Graduated in Medicine at University of Penna. Children: 

F. 1. Geo. W. P., b. 3, 8, 1857. M:— Aline Wood, first wife. Second, 
Eddie Graham. Children: G. 1. Frank, 2. Geo. H., Res., 
Abilene, Texas. 

2. Leonard R., b. 12, 25, 1858. M: — Janie Boardman. Children: 

G. 1. John T. 2. Leonard R. 3. Mary R. 4. Dorothy W. 
5. Robert B. 

3. Dewees R., b. 11, 20, ; d. 

4. Charles E. M: — Dolie Murin. Child: G. 1. Charles Hunter. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family 125 

5. Mary Louisa. M: — John A, Benedict. Children: G. 1. Anna. 

2. Harriet W. 

6. Jesse. M: — Mary M. Merritt. 

7. Rachel Anna. M:— Frank Martin. Res., 1000 Cathedral St., 

Bait, Md. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 5. Isaac Pennock Coates (Jesse, M.D. 
Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Susan Taylor Allison, of Chesapeake 
City, Md., b. 7, 2, 1839. Children: 

F. 1. Charles P., b. 7, 13, 1859. 2. Jesse. 3. Louis P. 4. Sarah P. 

5. Mabel, 6. Isaac P. Jr. 7. William G. 3. Chester Cyrill. 

B 2. C 3. D 1. E 1. Joseph Moore (Beulah, Isaac, Samuel, 
Moses) b. 3, 4, 1804. M:— Mary B. Douglass. Res., 147 State 
St., Chicago, 111. 

B 2. C 3. D 1. E 2. Hannah Moore (Beulah, Isaac, Samuel, 
Moses) M: — Thomas Hughes. Their children: 

F. 1. Beulah, b. 4, 24, 1829, in London, Britain Twp., Chester Co., Pa. 
M:— Howard Preston, son of Amos, 3, 21, 1855. Children: G- 
1. Maria. 2. Margaret. Res., Treeson, Chester. M: — Frank' 
lin Buckman, had three chiidren. 3. Caroline. 4. Thomas. 
M: — Irwin. 

B 2. C 3. D 1. E 3. Isaac Moore (Beulah, Isaac, Samuel, 
Moses) M: — Ruth Gawthrop, of Avondale, Pa: Children: 

F. I. Joseph, b. 7, 31, 1843. M: — Sarah Townsend. Children: G. 1. 
Amy. 2. Darwin. 3, Lindley. 4. Ruth. 5. Bessie. 6. 
7. Haldine. 

2. Lindley, b. 5, 26, 1845; d. 10, 21, 1S71. 

3. Hannah, b. 11, 18, 1849; d. 5, 31, 1855. 
4-5. Channing and Darwin. 

6. Lydia. 

B 2. C 2. D 5. E 6. Rachel Coates (Seymour, Isaac, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Erie Locke, of Indianapolis, Ind. Their 
children: 

F. 1, Charles, died young. 

2. Hannah Rebecca. 

3. Charles Erie. M:— Ella Brown. Children: G. 1. Campbell. 

2. Edith. 



126 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

4. Seymour. M: — Catherine Greenleaf. Children: G. 1. Preston 

Erie. 

5. Willie Moore Brown. M:— Charles Watts. Children: G. 1, 

Harvey. M:— , 1 child. 2. Seymour. M:— , 1 child. 3. Carl. 

B 2. C 3. D 5. E 6. Lydian Coates. (Seymour, Isaac, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Jacob L,. Mitcbener. Tbeir children: 

F. 1. Mary Auburn, b. 12, 25, 1844; d. 1, 3, 1845. 

2. Judkins Parker, b. 10, 5, 1847; d. io, 31, 1847. 

3. Judkins Parker, b. 10, 12, 1848; d. 1, 28, 1893. 

4. Mary Auburn, b. 11, 24, 1850. M:— George N. McCalvy, in 

1884; d. 1889. One child: G. 1. Irene Myrtle, b. 9, 3, 1885. 
Res., 1316 Olive St., Kansas City, Mo. 

5. Frank Byron, b. 11, 2, 1852; d. 7, 3, 1855. 

6. Irene, b. 10, 4, 1854; d. 8, 29, 1856. 

7. Frank Byron, b. 3, 18, 1856. M:— Elizabeth E. Payne. Children: 

G. 1. Jeanne Auston, b. 11, 7, i88i;d.6, 16, 1882. 2. Margaret, 
b. 11, 7, 1886. 3. Elizabeth Payne, b. 8, 6, 1889. 

8. Persey Shelby, b. 4, r, 1858; d. 2, 14, 1900. M: — Stella Ferguson. 

Their children: G. I. Francis LeRoy, b. 1, 17, 1883. M:— 
Grace Call. Child: H. 1, Marion. 

9. Willie Lincoln, b. 6, 6, 1862; d. 8, 5, 18S6. 
10. Pierce Preston, b. 10, 25, 1864. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. Simmons Coates (Lindley, Isaac, 
Samuel, Moses) M: — Emeline Jackson, at William Jackson's 
near West Grove, Pa., 1, 11, 1843. Simmons was killed by the 
upsetting of an ox-cart on his farm near West Grove, 10, 1862. 
Their children: 

F. 1, Gertrude, b. 12, 5, 1843. 

2. Elizabeth J., b. 7, 13, 1846. 

3. Ann Deborah, b. 8, 1, 1848; d. 11, 10, 1873, at West Grove, Pa. 

4. Rebecca, b. 8, 9, 1851; d. 7, 30, 1886. 

5. Evangeline, b. 2, 20, 1853. 

6. Lavenia, b. 4, 22, 1858. UNM. Res., Colorado Springs, Col. 

7. Emma S., b. 6, 10, 1876. Res., West Chester, Pa. 

Lavenia was a teacher in Millersville State Normal School, 
and was the first lady pupil who had taken the entire Scientific 
course up to 1896 in that School. Simmons was born near Gap, 
Lancaster Co., Pa., 2, 6, 1830, his wife, Deborah, was from Sads- 
bury Twp., same Co. They were both interrred at West Grove 
F.B.G., Chester Co., Pa. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 127 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 2. Keksey Coates (Lindley, Isaac, Samuel, 
Moses) M: — Sarah Walter Chandler, dau. of John and Maria 
Jane, of Kennett Square, Pa. Children: 

F. i. Laura, b. 2, 16, 1857, in Kennett Twp., Pa. 

2. John Lindley, b. 7, 8, i860. 

3. Arthur, b. S, 17, 1S64, in Kennett Twp., Pa. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 3. Comley Coates., died UNM. 

Generation G Children of F. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. F. Henry Ridgeway Coates. (Edwin- 
Howard, Caleb, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Gertrude Peck, 12, 
28, 1859, dau. of Charles and Mary Peck, b. in Charlestown 
Township, Chester Co., Pa., 1, 16, 1839. Gertrude P. Coates, 
died 1, 2, 1883. Henry R. Coates served in 97th Reg. Penna. 
Vols, from 1, 19, 1861, to 8, 28, 1865. Was Surgeon Major the 
last year of service. Twice enlisted voluntarially. Was Con- 
ductor on underground railroad from Morisville to Pemberton, 
on night express. Res., 3141 Fountain St., Phila., Pa. Their 
children: 

G. 1. Preston Ayers, b. in Charlestown, 2, 1, 1862; d. 9, 1, 1891. M: — 

Mary Kissin. Child: H. 1. Gertrude P., b. 1880. 
Prestou A. Coates' widow is again married. 

2. Llewellyn D., b. in Phila., 2, 10, 1S68. UNM. Is employed in 

Bridge Dept, Erie R. R., from Chicago to Erie, Pa. 

3. Mira Elaetta, b. in Phila., 8, 30, 1870. M:— Chas. Noonan, is 

now a widow, (1904). Child lives with her mother. H. 1. 
Mabel Noonan, b. 1893. 

4. Edwin Charles, b. in Phila., 4, 3, 1872; d. 4, 30, 1872. 

5. Margaret P., b. in Phila., 1, 30, 1873; d. 9, 10, 1878. 

6. Bessie, b. in Phila., 12, 8, 1874; d. 6, 30, 1875. 

7. Henry Shreve, b. in Phila., 10, 17, 1876. 

8. Mary Ann, b. 6, 27, 1S7S; d. 5, 9, 1SS1. 

9. Gertrude Peck, b. 11, 7, 1880. UNM., and at home, "and my 

right bower" (Henry R. Coates), H. R. C, also says: "The 
above is my family record and should meet with "Teddy's ap- 
probation," H. R. Coates. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 7. F3. Charles Elmer Mather (Esther- 
Virginia, Caleb, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M:— Annie D. Girumil, 



128 Gcneaolqoy of the Cnafr* ffnwlhi 

B 2. C 2. D 2-3. E 7. F 3. Charles E. Matiier (Esther 
Virginia, Caleb, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M:— Anne D. Gemmill, 
dau? of Zachariah and Margaret, 12, 2, 1875. Residence, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Their children: 

G. i. Arthur G. b. n, 1876, d. 11, 1879. 2. Josehpine Coates, b. 8, 11, 
1878. 

3. Victor Charles, b. 3, 8, 1880. M:— Catharine Ann Earle, 3, 6, 

1905, dau., of George H., Jr., of Phila. Pa. Victor is a graduate 
of Harvard College, 1903. 

4. Dorothy, b. 9, 1, 1884. 5. Gilbert, b. 12, 16, 1887. 

JtJ 2. C 2. D 2-3 E 7. F 4. Florence Virginia Mather 
(Esther- Virginia, Caleb, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Alfred 
Marshall. Res., in Laughorn, Pa., 1902. Children: 

G. 1. Clarence M. } died at 3 years. 

2. Frederick W. 

3. Richard, b. 6, 1889. 

B 2. C 3. D 2-3. E 7. F5. Irene Adelaid Mather (Esther 
Virginia, Caleb, Moses, Samnel, Moses) M: — William Henry 
Woodward, Atty., a graduate of U. of P., Class 1895. Practices 
law in Phila. M:— 6, 20, 1895. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 5. F 1. Charles Pennock Coates 
(Isaac Pennock, Jesse, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M: — Mary Eove. 
Their children: 

G. 1. Edward Edwards. 2. Mabel Hallett. 3. Charles H. 4. Lillian. 
Res., New Orleans, La. (1904). 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 5. F 2. Eouis Pierce Ellison Coates 
(Isaac Pennock, Jesse, Moses, Samuel. Moses) M: — Mary Chal- 
mers Ferguson, of Salem Va. Their children: 
G. 1. Marion Penrose, b. 1893. 

2. Louise Argyll, b. 1902; d. at 20 mos. 
Res., Chicago, 111. (1905). 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 5. F 6. Sarah Pennock Coates (Isaac 
Pennock, Jesse, Moses, Samuel; Moses) M:— John Maxiinilan 
Atlee, of Phila., Pa., now (1904) res., in New Orleans, La. 
Children: 

G. 1. Mabel Adele. 2. Isaac Pennock. Res., Fauquier Co., Va. 

B 2. C 2. D 2-11. E 5. F 7. Mabel Coates (Isaac Pennock, 
Jesse, Moses, Samuel, Moses) M:— Walter Atlee, bro. of Max- 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 129 

imilan of Phila., Pa. Res., (1904) in Bait., Md. Their children: 
G. John Walter. 2. Mabel Louise. 3. Jesse. 4. Felicie. 5. Victile. 
6. Mabel. 7. Marie. S. Elizabeth. 

B 2. C 3. D 5. E 1. F 1. Isaac Preston Coates (Preston, 
Seymour, Isaac, Samuel. Moses) M: — Charlotte Spangler. Is 
deceased. Resided in Pasadena, Cal. Their children. 

G. 1. Grace Amelia, b. 7, 22, 1S55. UNM. 

2. Roy Gass, b. 5. 4, 1857. UNM. 

3. Ernest Lander, b. 9; 1863; d. 10, 1S64. 

B 2. C 3. D 5. E 1. F 2. Amelia Baker Coates (Preston, 
Seymour, Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — 5, 22, 1848, Isaac Gass, b. 
in 1820; d. 10, 21, 1875. Amelia married second time, 12, 29, 
1880, Judge George W. Gettes, b. 1824; d. 11, 9, 1892, in Mans- 
field, Ohio, where the widow resides, 1905. Their children: 

G. 1. Florien Preston Gass, 12, 15, 1848. M: — Harriett Brownson. 
Their children: H. 1. Charles, b. 11, 17, 1S75. M:— Jennie 
Pierce. Their child: I. 1, Preston Florien, b. 10, 17, 1878. i t 
Sherlock, b. 10, 16, 1S6S. 3, Preston. 

2. Mary Amelia Gass, b. 1850; d. 1869. UNM. 

3. Bertie Lissa Gass, b. 6, 26, 1S64. M: — Francis Clive. Children: 

H. 1. Seymour F., b. 11, 27, 18S5. 2. Francis M,, b. 1, 2, 188S. 
3. Helen Coates, b. 8, 14, 1S93. 4. Arthur Spencer, b. 1, 21 
1895. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 1. Gertrude Coates (Simmons, 
Lindley, Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — Ezra, son of Geo. and Anna 
Webster, of Collaraer, Chester Co., Pa., at her home near West 
Grove, Pa., 1, 17, 1867. She res. 52 S. Clinton St., Orange, N. 
Y. (1905). Children: 

G. 1. Frederic, b. at West Grove, Pa., 12, 5, 1867. Res., New Brighton, 
Pa., where he married, 4, 28, 1897, Maud S. Sperry, b. 9, 12, 
1870, dau. of Wm. M. and Emma J. Their children: H. 1. 
Elenor. 2. Margaret. 3. Wm. S, 
2. Walter C, b. 9, 24, 1873, at Downingtown, Pa. With Westing" 
house Electric Co., 120 Broadway, N.Y. Res., 525 Clinton St. 
Orange, N.Y. M:— n, 10, 1903, Eva (Foster) Firth, of Lair 
caster, Pa. Child: H. 1. Walter Foster, b. 5, 15, 1905. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 2. Elizabeth J. Coates (Simmons, 
Ivindley, Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M:— 3, IS, 1869, Hon. Marriott, 



130 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

son of Clarksou and Rachel (Hambleton) Brosius, b. on a farm 
at Octoraro, Lancaster Co., Pa., 3, 4, 1843. He studied Law 
in Lancaster, under Jas. Black, and was elected to Congress from 
the 10th district of Penna. , and reelected to each succeding term 
until his death which occurred at his home in Lancaster, Pa., 
419 W. Orange St. Their children: 

G. I. Gertrude C, b. in Lencaster, 5, 20, 1S71. M: — Herbert B. Coho j 
son of Frank and Emma, of same city. Their children: H. 1, 
Gertrude B., b. 4, 28, 1S97. 2. Helen E., b, 2, 27, 1899. 

2. Louretta R., b, 9, 19, 1872; d. 10, 14, 1S7S. 

3. Florence, b. 6, 4, 1875; d. 3, 28, 1S76. 

4. Grace Anna, b. 4, 18, 1877. M: — Clement Biddle, Jr., 11, 28, 1900. 

Child: H. 1. Elizabeth B., Res., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 2. 
Caroline Cooper, b. 2, 1, 1906. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 4. Rbbejcca Coates (Simmons, Lind- 
ley, Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — Samuel Grumbine, 5, 5, 1873, 
be, was born at Fredericksburg, Lebanon Co., Pa., 5, 5, 1848. He 
is a Lawyer. Was City Solicitor for six years, and President of 
the School Board for four years. Is a member of P. E. Church. 
Res., Titusville, Pa. Their children: 

G. i. Agnes Emeline, b. 6, 10, 1876. 

2. Lucy Coates, b. 12, 1, 1878. M:— Rev. Albert J. Nock, 4, 27, 1900 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 5. Evangeline Coates (Simmons, 
Lindley, Isaac, Samuel, Moses) M: — At West Grove, Pa., 4, IS, 
1877, to William Penn Harper, son of John and Mary Ann 
Harper, of New Garden, Chester Co., Pa. W. P. H. was born, 
1, 6, 1854. They settled in Mansfield, Ohio, and in 1887 moved 
to Seattle, Washington. Are members of Congregational Church, 
and reside No. 651 Kinnear Place, Seattle, Washington. Their 
children: 

G. 1. Florence Coates, b. in Mansfield, O., 1, 29, 1878. d. 

2. Paul Coates, b. in Mansfield, O., 9, 11, 1880. 

3. Evangeline, b. in Mansfield, O., 6, 23, 1883. d. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 7. Emma Simmons Coates (Simmons, 
Lindley, Isaac, Samuel, Moses). Born at West Grove, Pa., and 
married at same place to Marshall Yeatman Pusey, 2, 23, 1888, 
son of Jesse D. and Hannah D. (Yeatman) Pusey, of London 
Grove, Chester Co., Pa. M. Y. P. was born 4, 22, 1864. They 



Gcneaology of the Coatcs Family. 131 

settled at John Yeatman's mill property, in London, Britain 
Township, Chester Co. , Pa. , but afterward moved to West Ches- 
ter, Pa. Res., 425, W. Union St. Are members of the Religious 
Society of Friends. Their children: 

G. I. Ralph Marshall, b. in London, Britain Township, Pa., 2, 17, 

1893; d. 1, 13, 1894. 

2. Edith Hannah, b. I, 22, 1896. 

3. Grace Evangeline, b, 1, 17, 1897. 

B 2. C 3. D 9. E 1. F 1. Laura Coates (Kersey, Lindley, 
Isaac, Samuel, Moses). In 1874, was a student at Vassar Col- 
lege. In 1879, M: — Homer Reed, a Lawyer of Kansas City, Mo., 
a native of Leslie, Mich., and graduate of Ann Arbor University. 
Res., Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Reed has always been active in 
literary and social matters. A frequent contributor to the local 
Press, and published in 1894, a novel, "West and East," em- 
bodying an Algerian tour. In 1SS9 published a volvme in mem- 
ory of her mother. A member of Christian Science Church, and 
President of "The women of the Humane Society," of Kansas 
City. Their children: 

G. 1. Kersey, b. 11, 15, 18S0. Graduated in Department of Law, Yale, 
1902, admitted to Bar in his native city, in 1904. 

2. Thomas Hitchcock, b, 2, 1 , 18S3. In 1905, a student in Mines* 

at Golden Col. 

3. Sarah Elsa, b. 2, 25, 1885. Is a member of Christian Science 

Church and an expert musician. 

4. Laura, Jr., b. 6, 10, 187S. An expert musician on violin, which 

she has adopted as a profession. Is also a member of Chris 
tian Science Church. M: — 12, 27, 1905, at her home in Kansas 
City, Edward E. Yaggy, of Kansas. 

5. Homer, Jr. b. 5, 27, 1S89. 

6. Isabel, b. 4, 11, 1896. 

Kersey Coates was the eldest son of Lindley and Deborah. 
Was educated for the profession of Law, under Hon. Thaddeus 
Stevens, of Lancaster, Pa. Was admitted to the Bar in 1858. 
Was much exercised in the difficulties in irregularities in the 
frontier, and also in the anti-slave cause before the War of the 
Rebellion, in both of which he took active parts. Was very 
active in the settlement of Kansas, having seen Kansas virtually 
through her troubles he returned to Missouri, locating in Kansas 
City, where he resided the remainder of his life. Was Colonel 



132 



Geneaology af the Coates Family. 



of the 77th Regiment of E. M. M. which rendered valuable ser- 
vice during the "Price raid," of 1864. At the close of the war he 
returned to the city of his adoption, and devoted his time and 
means to building up the present great city; being one of the 
main men to develope its possibilities for a commercial center. 
Public-spirited, broad-minded, self-reliant, far-seeing in making 
public investments, his integrity beyond question, he stands the 
most conspicuous figure in the history of Kansas City, says an 
editorial concerning him. "His speech was always wise, and 
often charmingly illumed with wit. His repartee was almost 
matchless." 

He died in Kansas City on the 24th of April, 1887. He was 
buried in Elmwood Cemetery. It was most appropriate that he 
should have been borne to his last resting place by colored men 
who had been granted the honor by their request, for in paying 
this respect to the dead, they were honoring two sturdy genera- 
tions of sturdy defenders of freedom. 



Inscription on back of Deed owned by Mr. W. A. Valentine, 
Cain Post Office, Chester Co., Pa. 

DEED. 

Isaac Coates & Wife 

To John Jones. 



Acres. 

35 



Roods. 

1 



Perches. 
16 



Entered and Registered in the 
here is "] Office for recording of deeds in 

seal of and for the County of Chester in 

Recorders \ Book E 2 Vol. 29 page 513 &c 

Office of This 4th day of Sept. A. D. , 1790. 

Chester Co. J Witness my hand and seal of sd. 

Office. 

This Indenture Made the Sixteenth Day of the Eighth 
Month Year of our Lord One Thousand Seventeen Hundred and 
Ninety Between Isaac Coates of East Cain Township in Chester 
County and State of Pennsylvania Yeoman and Hannah his Wife 
■of the one Part, And John Jones of the same Place, Saddler of 



Geneaohgy of the Coates Family. 133 

the other Part: Whereas in aud by certain Indentures duly exe- 
cuted, one whereof under the Hands and Seals of Aaron Coates 
and Mary his Wife bearing Date the 23rd Day of the 11th Month 
A. D., 1769; and the other under the Hands and Seals of Moses 
Coates and Mary his Wife, bearing Date the 22d Day of the 3rd 
Month A. D. 17S7; after reciting as is therein particularly re- 
cited, and for the considerations therein severally mentioned, 
they the said Aaron Coates and Mary his Wife aud Moses Coates 
and Mary his Wife, Did Grant, Bargain, Sell, Release and Con- 
firm unto the said Isaac Coates and his Heirs and Assigns certain 
Tracts Pieces or Parcels of Land situate in the Townships of 
East Cain and East Fallowfield in the said County of Chester, 
containing by Estimation Two hundred and ninety-eight Acres. 
To Hold to him the Said Isaac Coates his Heirs and Assigns for- 
ever, as in and by the said recited Indentures recorded in the 
Office for recording of Deeds for the County of Chester in Book 
T. Vol. 19. Page 133, and in Book 2. Vol. 26 Page 372. Refer- 
erence thereunto respectively being had may more fully and at 
large appear. Now This Indenture Wituesseth That the said 
Isaac Coates and Hannah his Wife for and in Consideration of 
the Sum of Three hundred and Seventy three Pounds ten Shil- 
lings current lawful Money of Pennsylvania to them in Hand 
well and truly paid by the said John Jones at or before the Seal- 
ing and Delivering of these Presents, the receipt wherof they do 
hereby acknowledge, and thereof do acquit exonerate and for- 
ever discharge the said John Jones his Heirs and Assigns by 
these Presents Have Granted Bargained Sold Released and con- 
firmed, and by these Presents Do Grant Bargaiu Sell Release and 
Confirm unto the said John Jones and to his Heirs and Assigns, 
a certain Lot or Piece of Land (it being a Part of Land above 
mentioned) situate lying and being in East Cain Township afore- 
said, Beginning at a Corner Chestnut Oak, thence by Land of 
Thomas Hart, North three Degrees and forty five Minutes West, 
One hundred and sixty three Perches to a post thence by Land 
of said Isaac Coates North Eighty eight degrees and a half East 
thirty four Perches and seven tenths of a Perch to a Post, thence 



134 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

South three Degrees forty five Minutes West, One hundred and 
sixty three Perches to a Post, thence by Land of the said Isaac 
Coates North Eighty-eight Degrees and a half West thirty four 
Perches and seven Tenths of a Perch to the Place of Beginning, 
containing Thirty five Acres one Quarter and sixteen Perches of 
Land be the same more or less, Together with all and singular 
the Houses Barns Buildings Improvements Gardens Orchards 
Meadows Woods Ways Waters Watercourses Rights, Liberties 
Privileges Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever there- 
unto belonging or in any wise appertaining, and the Reversions 
Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof, and all the Estate 
Right Title Interest Use Possession Property Claim and Demand 
whatsoever of them the said Isaac Coates and Hannah his Wife 
of into or out of the said Lot or Piece of Land Hereditaments or 
Premises or any Part thereof: (Excepting and always reserv- 
ing unto the said Isaac Coates and to his Heirs and Assigns for- 
ever, the free and uninterrupted Use and Privilege of a certain 
Stream of Water rising and running northwards on the above- 
said described Piece or Lot of Land above conveyed unto the 
said John Jones by the said Isaac Coates, from the Sixth Hour 
in the Evening of every Seventh day in the Week until the Sixth 
Hour in the Evening of every Second day next ensuing, with 
full Privilege of Ingress Egress and Regress, to cleanse scour and 
open a Race or Watercourse to carry the said Stream of Water 
into the Meadow of the said Isaac Coates at the southeast Corner 
of the Meadow of the said John Jones' Lot near the Gum Tree 
standing in the same) To Have and to Hold the said Lot or Piece 
of Land Hereditaments and Premises hereby granted or men- 
tioned to be granted with the Appurtances unto the said John 
Jones, To the only proper Use Benefit and Behoof of him the 
said John Jones his Heirs and Assigns forever: (Except as above 
excepted). Under the proportionable Part of the Yearly Quit- 
rent hereby accruing for the same to the chief Proprietor or Pro- 
prietors of the Fee thereof. And the said Isaac Coates and 
Hannah his Wife and their Heirs the said described Lot or Piece 
of Land Hereditaments and Premises hereby granted or men 



Geneaology oj the Coates Family, 135 

tioned or intended so to be and every Part thereof with the Ap- 
pnrtances unto the said John Jones, his Heirs and Assigns, against 
them the said Isaac Coates and Hannah his Wife and their Heirs, 
and against all and every other Person and Persons whomsoever 
lawfully claiming or to claim by from or under him, her, them, 
or any of them, shall and will warrant and forever Defend by 
these Presents. In Witness whereof the said Parties to these 
Presents have interchangeably set their Hands and Seals hereun- 
to: Dated the Day and Year first above written. 
Sealed and delivered Isaac Coates [Seal] . 

in the Presence of us. Hannah Coates [Seal] . 

Thos. Stalker, Junr. 

Jane Stalker. 

John Worth. 

Received at the Date hereof of John Jones the Sum of Three 
hundred and seventy three Pounds ten Shillings, it being the full 
Consideration for the above granted Premises, We say received 
By us, Isaac Coates. 

Hannah Coates. 

Witness present, Thos. Stalker, Junr., Jane Stalker. 

Chester SS The Sixteenth Day of the Eighth Month Anno 
Domini 1790 before me John Worth Esq. one of the Justices of 
the Court of Common Pleas for the County of Chester came the 
above named Isaac Coates and Hannah his Wife, and acknowl- 
edged the above Writing to be their Act and Deed, and desired 
the same may be recorded as such, Hannah being in full Age and 
the Contents made know to her, she being secretly and apart ex- 
amined : Witness my Hand and Seal the Day and Year above- 
said. John Worth [Seal]. 

Brief of Title, extracted from Coates Deeds in possession of 
J. Gilbert Hatfield, Cain, Chester Co., Pa. Gotten, 6, 16, 1904, 
bv T. Coates: 



136 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

Lease for One Year. Anthony Morris, Jr., an Exer. of 
Anthony Morris, Sr. to 
Moses Coates. 492 a. 
Dec. 13, 1728. 



Witness: A. Brockett. 
Saml. Gifford. 

Release: Edward Smout 

to 
Moses Coates. Dec. 8, 1730. 

Witnesses: John Shanan. 

Thomas Valentine. 



Signed: Antho. Morris (Seal).. 
Israel Pemberton (Seal). 



Signed: Edward Smout. 



Deed: John Jones, to Isaac Coates, for 10 a 74 p 
April 1, 1797. 

Signed: John Jones (Seal). 
Esther Jones. 
jQ 250. Witnesses: Samuel Cunningham. 
James Bing. 

Deed: Aaron Coates and wife 

to 
Isaac Coates, 246 a £ 164 
Nov. 11, 1769. 



Witnesses: Caleb Kirk. 

Joseph Gladden. 
David Wilson. 



Signed: Aaron Coates. 
Mary Coates. 



Release: Isaac Coates to Moses Coates, Jun. 
Nov. 23, 1769. 
135 a 5 Shillings. 

Signed: Isaac Coates. 
Witnesses: Warrick Miller. 
Saml. Coates. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 137 

Release: Moses Coates Jr. & wife 

to 
Isaac Coates. 
Nov. 23, 1769. 

145 a Signed: Hannah Coates. 

5 perches Moses Coates. 

Witnesses: Warrick Miller. 
Saml. Coates. 

Deed: Aaron Coates & wife to Moses Coates, Nov. 23, 1769, 246 
a £ 164. Signed: Aaron Coates. 

Mary Coates, 
Witnesses: Caleb Kirk. 

Joseph Gladden. 

David Wilson. 

Patent: Isaac Coates and Moses Coates, 18 a 10 pchs. 
March 4, 1783. 

Signed: John Dickinson. 

Deed: Moses Coates and wife to Isaac Coates. 
March 22, 1787. Signed: Moses Coates (Seal). 

246 a £ 1600. Mary Coates. 

Witnesses: John Fleming. 

William Truman. 

Mortgage Deed: Jenken Jones and wife to 

Hannah Coates and Seymour Coates, admis. of 

Feby. 5, 1811. Est., Isaac Coates, late of East Cain 

$1760 

100 acres of land in 

West Fallowfield Township. 

Signed: Jenken Jones. 
Witnesses: Robert Miller. 
Nathan Jones. 



138 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Deed: Lindley Coates to Seymour Coates for 2 tracts: 
one of 76 a 122 p & one of 6 a in East Cain twp. 
Paid $ 8000. 

Signature: Lindley Coates (Seal). 
March 27, 1819. 
Witnesses: Robert Miller. 

Hannah Coates. 

Deed: Deborah Coates & others, Admis. &c. of Seymour Coates 
deed, to Samuel Hatfield. 
For 204 a 69 p of land in East Cain. 

Dec. 21, 1831. Signed: Deborah Coates (Seal). 

$11,949.51 Preston Coates (Seal). 

Witness: Ziba Pyle. Lindley Coates (Seal). 

Plantation of 180 a 69 p for 
$ 10.960.41. 

18 a woodland $717.60. 
6 a " 271.50. 



HOW I WENT TO SMASH. 
By Elmer Ruak Coates. 

My name is John Morris McGundy, 

I once was a man of renown; 
I drove a good team on a Sunday, 

And entered a firm in this town. 
I know I am shockingly seedy, 

And daily the fact I bewail; 
But give me a minute's attention, 

I'll tell you how I happened to fail. 

We had on the right a rich neighbor, 
Her palace would do for a queen; 

She was never brought up to labor, 
And thought it degrading and mean. 

One day my wife said : "Mr. Gundy 
There are forty kisses in store, 



Genealogy of the Coatee Family. 139 

If you will buy me a sofa, 
As nice as the one they've next door." 

Spoken— I drew a check, didn't quite pay my baker, and 
bought the sofa. 

One week after getting the sofa, 

When having my landlord to pay, 
Said Mrs. McGundy: "My Darling, 

There's something I'm dying to say: 
I know that my dear is obliging, 

No natter how many the cares, 
But Gundy, I think the new sofa 

Is taking the shine off the chairs." 

Spoken: — I drew another check, didn't quite pay my 
landlord, and bought some chairs. 

Well, soon as the chairs were delivered, 

I thought there an end to my strife: 
I stood rather low with my butcher, 

But then I stood high with my wife. 
Now one thing called out for another; 

I give you my word, it is true — 
We furnished the garret and cellar 

With all that was splendid and new. 
Spoken: — No money in bank, I borrowed a check, shirked 

the coal men and felt as solid as sponge cake. 

'Twas on^a cold day in December, 

I'd taken my dinner in style; 
The butcher came into my parlor, 
And sat on the sofa thegwhile. 

Then came up the landlord and baker, 
And each gave a jerk at the bell; 

The^baker said I was a villain, 
And the landlord declared it a sell. 

Spoken:— When I think of I am inclined to — 

So, on a cold day in December, 

When even the fire would freeze, 
A little red flag in our window 

Was seen to play out in the breeze. 
We had the out doors for a dwelling. 



140 Genealogy of the Coatcs Family, 

It gives me the horrors to think; 
But wife took to work for a living, 
And Mr. McGundy to drink. 

Spoken: — At which I made a full hand. 

A LITTLE CREAM. 

In order to keep above water, 

You'd better eat hoe-cake and beans; 
Than tickle a wife or a daughter, 

By rushing ahead of your means. 
Don't follow your wealthier neigh bors- 

Don't ape all their§habits and airs; 
And see that you pay off the baker, 

Before you buy sofas and chairs. 



THE LITTLE QUAKER GIRL. 

By Elmer Ruan Coates. 
(Written for the Telephone). 

Yes, I'm The little Quaker girl," 

You schoolmates laugh at me, 
But I shall cling to "thy" and "thine," 

To "art" and "thou" and "thee." 
This Quaker language fills my soul 

With all you love the best; 
It bears the calm and soothing tone 

That makes me truly blest. 

When yougapproach me with a "you," 

I feel so icy cold; 
I'm wondering what harm I've done, 

What slander has been told. 
I quickly turn to see a frowr, 

And think how sweet 'twould be, 
If I could hear the music of 

That loving, gentle "thee." 

O, blissful words of purest thought 

We venerate and crave ! 
C, holy words that take the sting 

From sorrow and the grave ! 
They seem to fit the angel .ongue 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. l^X 

And glad their Holy Land; 
This "Friend'My talk will touch the heart 
And bring the helping hand. 

When mercy gives her timely gift 

And turns a gloom to glee. 
She's so inclined to r sink the "y° u " 

And say : I give to "thee." 
When sympathy would reach her palm 

To soothe the fevered brow, 
How often she would leave the "you" 
To comfort one with "thou." 

When hearts and hands would find their mates 

For that communion free, 
How rarely they go out to "you," 
We give them both to "thee." 
These lovely words will warm the soul 

For any noble deed; 
Most all reforms that calm the storms, 

Have Quakers in the lead. 

Laugh all you wish, but here's a point 

You must allow is true 
Address the Father and the Son, 

And then we drop the "you." 
'Tis: Father, wilt "Thru" grant my prayer? 

Or: Christ, I come to "Thee;" 
And the sweet language sent to Them, 

I hope you'll give to me. 



THE POSTMAN. 

By Elmer Ruan Coates. 

(Respectfully dedicated to the Postman). 

In governmental uniform 

I daily trip along my way, 
Nodding as I hurry on, 

Or firing out the verbal play; 
For we, who make the daily call, 
Seem common property of all. 



142 Genealogy af the Coates Family. 

A sameness, yet a varied life ! 

I suffer in the summer glow, 
Then bow before the autum blast 

While pondering the winter snow. 
While some can choose the house or street, 
I have the elements to meet. 

Yes, there is much monotony — 
The same old walk of mile to mile; 

I carry sorrow to the home, 
And then I make the gloomy smile. 

While many wait with solemn dread, 

Some long to hear my nimble tread. 

A lily hand receives a note 

That flames a pair of lovely eyes; 

There's maiden laughter in the hall, • 
The rapture of a sweet surprise : 

Her lover's coming from the West — 

Her head will dream upon his breast. 

Again I ring, and here I find 
The wedding march, the looks of pride; 

The happy carriage leaves the door 
With old shoes following the bride; 

But while the love-freight moves away, 

There's nodding to the man in giay. 

Here is the lonely, humble cot 
Without a bell, and I must rap; 

A foreign stamp is gently laid 
Upon a mother's aged lap. 

She reads: Her boy will cross the brine 

And bring the balm of her decline. 

I ring. There's one in playful mood, 
With bounding step and music voice; 

But oh, the letter edged in black ! 
I falter, yet there is no choice. 

Then soon the corpse is carried home. 

Sweet voice of music, what a moan! 

That playful one, who'd gaily sing 
Her bliss-refrain with feeling true, 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 143 

Hums minor music by a tomb 

In garb in corresponding hue. 
In black I meet her every day; 
Sweet; mournful smile, but naught to say. 

I bear the word that't worse than death — 

The lack of faith, the broken vow, 
The polar ice for tropic warmth. 

I note the sigh, the knitting brow; 
Then how I long to give delight, 
To throw a moonbeam in some night. 

'Tis strange, but I'm receiving thanks, 

As though I wrote the gladsome news 
And then I hear the blighting frown 

My peaceful nature would refuse. 
I daily fare, as postmen know, 
According to the weal or woe* 

Variety ! Monotony ! 

The same old happiness and pain, 
The half-paid walk of mile to mile, 

Through summer heat and winter rain: 
But news will go in calm and storm, 

And some must wear the uniform. 



OBITUARY. 
Elmer Ruan Coates, Author. 
From Phila. Evening Telegraph, io, 24, iSSp. 

Elmer Ruan Coates poet and dramatist, died yesterday (24th 
inst.) in West Philadelphia. He was the youngest son of the 
late Dr. Caleb Coates, and brother of the late Edwin Coates, who 
was prominent in the peace and temperance movements, and for- 
merely in the abolition cause, in which he gained an international 
reputation. 

He was graduated from the Western Reserve University in 
the same class with President Harrison, and afterwards took the 
degree of Bachelor of Law, from the University of Pennsylvania. 

He published many poems, and was a frequent contributor 



144 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

to newspapers and magazines in this country and Europe. His 
poem c 'Laurel Hill," in book form, is well known, and among 
his shorter pieces may be mentioned "The Origin of the Sophia 
Waltz," and "A Night in Venice." He was the author of 
several plays, which he was prevented from producing from lack 
of health to attend to their proper presentation. His ' 'Music 
Mad," with John Drew and Effie Jermon in the leading parts, 
was brought out at the Walnut Street Theatre, and the "Comedy 
of Blunders," at the Chestnut Street theatre, with Mrs. Daven- 
port and Lillian Davenport in the cast. 

Just before his death he finished what he regarded as the 
crowning work of his life, — a novel, which will be published. 
As, however, the copyright has not been obtained, the name can- 
not be given now. From his } 7 outh he labored under the con- 
stant discouragement of nervous asthma, and all that he accom- 
plished was in the midst of constant suffering with frequent stop- 
pages from nervous exhaustion. The funeral will take place on 
Monday from Fair Hill Meeting House. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
(Elmer Ruan Coates, died October 24th, 1889.) 
Another of earth's sons, 

The good and nobly great, 
Has gone to join the throng 

Of angel spirits bright: 
No more his feeble form 

Shall brave the storms of fate, 
Nor round the social hearth 

Dispense its warmth and light. 

Fame, of her choicest blooms, 

Shall fondly, sweetly twine 
Around that honored name 

(Fit theme for seraph-tongue) 
A wreath more during far 

Than marble bust or shrine, 
Or gem from secret rock 

By art laborious wrun«% 

— Thomas G Gentry. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 145 

Marlborough, Ohio, 8th, 19th, 1861. 
Dear Brother: — 

I hardly need apologize for my omission in conveying my 
ideas in answer to thy kind epistle of the 4th of 10th mo., al- 
though my time has been occupied in different spheres; still one 
of them should undoubtedly have been applied for thy special 
benefit, and I am aware, gratification, but so it is. 

I can hardly tell the cause, one thing certain thee may rest 
assured of, it is not for want of kind and Brotherly affections: 
the warmest degree of love rests between our hearts, and it is a 
pleasure for me to occupy that thought, in casting reflection on 
former days: Ah, w 7 ere the times to be lived over again how 
they might be improved, but the days and years have glided 
away, and left many a blank, that should have been devoted to 
the cause of righteousness and left us stars of gratitude to be gazed 
at with heaven 1}' joy, and crowned minds with that love by re- 
membrance, that would not be shaded with spots, to cause 
anguish by their not being obliterated in the outset. 

I am aware that I have fallen far short of the duties that 
have been incumbent upon me, in the purpose of Creation, and 
it is a mournful thought when applied to self, when time is nearly 
in full measure and running over for us, yet, morally speaking 
w T e have traveled our Journey in life with good esteem: without 
wilful defect to our fellowineu. A consoling idea: now as our 
gray hairs are fast wafting away; it is consoling to think that 
there has been an advocate, pleading within us, and directing to 
that peace which crowns the mortal soul with those beauties that 
dignify man and prepare him for the realms of bliss that never 
fades away. 

I do really mourn, that so much intelligence as we have in 
this age is cast to gratify self, and not applied to that purpose 
which man was created for that is, to glory his Maker. Yet he 
is dishonored by the worldly, by the laws of the world. The 
meek and humble that was placed upon the Cross and expired 
between two thieves, who could have called legions of angels to his 



146 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

assistance, had he been as the rulers of this world, but nay "for- 
give them," was his request. He carried out the nonresistance 
principle: (which is not a life-taking principle) that is the only- 
platform or conveyance that the Christian can be supported by. 
His precepts and example and whole life evidently substantiate 
the fact; for when Cain slew his brother Abel the great and 
mighty Judge, the only righteous, put not the sentence of death 
upon him, but marked him that none should disturb him. 

Here is the first murder, and the first Judicial court, with 
the Judge of Heaven and of earth, who decides for man to live 
and work out his own Salvation. If our Judges were to take 
precedence from this court, and not from modern laws, happy 
would be the effect, but now it's blood for blood; how unrational, 
unnatural and brutish. We hear it expressed every day, by 
bloodthirsty men when they are brought to their feelings, and 
saying that it's aweful that Fathers and sons and brothers, in 
carnage against each other, this is self evident of the unrighteous- 
ness of the life-taking principle, for it is murder in taking human 
life in any case, or human law, for it is written, whence cometh 
wars and fighting? Come they not of your lust? Yes, self-grati- 
fication, the lust of the flesh, of the eye, and pride of life gen- 
erates animosities and turns love into hatred, and all consequent 
evils. 

I received a letter from my dear and kind niece, Lucretia, 
of the 22nd, 6th month last, which was invigorating to my 
spirit, with the exception of thy indisposition of health, which 
was affecting, but we are liable to afflictions, and our tender 
nerves worn by age are easily affected, but to be prepared for the 
torments of this world, of body and mind, is the beauty of this 
life, and the crown and felicity in that of the future. 

I must change my theme, as thee wants a genealogy. As 
thee has mine with the exception of Howard H. Coates, who is 
23, and Ridgeway Coates, my youngest child, is near 21 years of 
age. Moses' wife's name was Mary Ann Young, his youngest 
child is William C, about 16, and George S., about 6 years of 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 147 

age. Morris's wife's name was Mary Ann Randolph, their eld- 
est son Silvanus about 15, Moses 12 and Evaline 9 years of age. 

Hannah married Joseph D. Arnold (who died last 4th month, 
a fine man he was). Their eldest son, James Monroe, about 11, 
Bell 7, Florence 5 and Gertrude 3 years of age. Hayes C, mar- 
ried Emeline Ward, their eldest son, Alfred, about 13, Phebe 11, 
and Laura 7 years of age. Jesse married Virginia Brown, their 
eldest, Leora Gertrude 11, John 9, Elmer 7, Mariah 5, and Clif- 
ford 3 years of age. George married Mary Black, eldest, Jane 
about 9, Harriett 7 years. Oliver married Catharine Lane, one 
son, Edwin. Mary Ann, married Joseph Constantine Warner, 
have none living. Howard married Cordelia Hale, one son about 
1 year old. 

I have given a pretty good share, and as near as I can come 
to ages. Ridgeway is single, is in Indiana, or out west with the 
(pump patent). 

Thy son, Lewis, was here yesterday, from the South, prob- 
ably leaves tomorrow for Philadelphia. He has become quite a 
southern principled man. I was astonished to hear him on south- 
ern topics. I think it a pity such a mind as his should become 
so contaminated with such inhuman principles, but he is not the 
first nor only one that has been led estray. But as permanently 
as he is fixed there is a higher story of the mind for him to as- 
cend which will finally have to be inhabited by purer motives, 
than the present occupied, to gain the point of his noble creation. 

It is most enough for man to know himself, enough for him to 
know, but in that stead, he seeks the observation and geography 
of others, poor human nature, how frail, as not to know what 
human nature is: Vile is the disposition that abandons that 
which it would not be willing to accept, (that is the action of 
self love). Lewis may possibly view these lines, and he knows 
how to extend my views, 

Covetuousness is apt to lead the mind to any length and al- 
most auy thing, because it is the boon of sin, and the highest 
seat of Lucifer. 



148 Genealogy of the Coafes Family. 

I have omitted Amos W., my next after Oliver. He married 
Ada S. Freer, have one child, Horace Lucian Coates, over a year 
ago. I have left off housekeeping. Shall make my home pretty 
much with Amos, at Paris, in this County, 11 miles from here, 
so letters may be directed here for me. I have not been out this 
summer with my pump, times are dull, nothing in a manner 
doing, crops were rather slim in this section of most all kinds, the 
weather being very dry for summer vegetation. All are in pretty 
good health. Lewis can inform thee I had a pretty hard attack 
of typhoid this spring, feel pretty well except my old liver com- 
plaint. With much love to thee, Lucretia and all thy family. 

Thy Affectionate Brother, 
Amos Coatks. 
To Caleb Coates. 
I will write to Lucretia soon. 



The following account of Lindley Coates is taken from "His- 
tory of the Underground Railroad in Chester and the neighbor- 
ing Counties of Pennsylvania," by R. C. Smedle}-, M.D. 
"LINDLEY COATES, 
Born 3 mo., 3rd, 1794. Died 6th mo., 3rd, 1856. 

Lindley Coates, of Sadsbury, Lancaster County, was one of 
the earliest of the active Abolitionists. Possessing more than 
ordinary intellectual ability, earnest in the cause of the slave, 
conscientious in all his purposes, and a clear and forcible speaker, 
he inspired others with the same sincerit}' and zeal that actuated 
him in the anti-slaver}' movement. Though modest in his ambi- 
tions, he was a man adapted by nature to rule over men, and 
made a masterly presiding officer. He was noted for his clear- 
ness of thought, soundness of judgment, and steadiness of nerve, 
and marked executive ability. Hence his counsel was sought 
in matters of enterprise in the community in which he resided 
By his neighbors he was called "long-headed." 

He was not voluble in speech, but being a clear reasoner 
very sagacious, terse ard rjjcdte in his remarks, he was con- 



Genealogy of the Coatcs Family. 149 

sidered a sharp contestant in debate, and never failed to adduce 
irrefragable argument in all discussions upon moral reform in 
which he felt an active interest. One noted characteristic he 
possessed was a remarkable astuteness in so cross-questioning the 
opponent as to elicit answers confuting his own argument. 

Benjamin Jones, the humorous rhymster who portrayed the 
characteristics of leading abolitionists in amusing rhymes, thus 
pays his compliments to Iyindley Coates: 

Pray Lindley, don't vex one, 

By asking a question, 

That answered, upsets his own side; 

'Tis very perplexing, 

And shamefully vexing, 

For one's self to prove he has lied. 

He was opposed to avarice, and considered it one of the 
greatest evils institgating men to impose one upon another. 

Slaves came to his place from Maryland and contiguous 
States, from Daniel Gibbons, Thomas Whitson and others, and 
were taken to James Williams, Joseph Fulton, Mordecai Ha} 7 es, 
Ammor Kimber and to other stations, as seemed best, according 
to circumstances or exigences at the time. Some who were very 
intelligent were taken a considerable distance, and then directed 
how and where to go. Some called who were steering for Canada, 
taking the north star as their guide. These would obtain the 
names of the Underground Railroad agents along the route, and 
then proceed by themselves, taking their own chances. 

It was the custom of the family to make very few inquiries 
beyond what they felt needful to satisfy themselves that the ap- 
plicants were bona fide fugitives from the South. 

Extra precautionary measures were taken after the Chris- 
tiana riot to prevent the arrest of any negroes about their prem- 
ises. All who came at that time were taken to the cornfield and 
secreted under the shocks, as Lindle}^ and his wife were expect- 
ing their house to by searched by deputised officials who were 
then scouting the country, searching houses of Abolitionists to 
see if negroes were in them, and arresting ever}^ colored person 



150 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

upon whom they could in any way fix a glimmer of suspicion of 
having been connected with the tragedy at Christiana. 

He aided in forming the Clarkson Anti-slavery Association, 
before the American Society had an existence and was an advo- 
cate of immediate emmaucipation when the name of William 
Lloyd Garrison was comparatively little know. 

In 1840, when the new organization schism took place in 
New York, he was chosen president of the American Anti-slavery 
Society, and filled creditably, the duties of that office till, upon 
his resignation, William Lloyd Garrison was appointed to take 
his place. 

With approaching age and ill health his principles had under- 
gone no change and his faith in their triumph "knew no shadow 
of turning." He died as he lived, a true friend of freedom, and 
his name will be preserved in the history of the anti-slavery enter- 
prise as one of the ablest and most worthy companions. 

Lindley Coates was a member of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion of 1837, and made the most strenuous efforts to prevent the 
insertion of the word "white" into the organic law of the state 
of Pennsylvania, whereby the suffrage was restricted to members 
of the Caucasian race. Thomas Earle and Thaddeus Stevens, 
were also prominent members of the convention, worked hard 
against hand change, but all without avail. 

History tells us a number of the Coates families of Chester 
and Lancaster Counties were prominent workers in the anti-slavery 
cause before the War of the Rebellion, as we find the names of 
Deborah, Simmons, and Emeline, wife, son and daughter-in-law 
of Lindley, Levi, Warrick, Sr., Edwin, Elizabeth, Moses and 
Sarah, as active workers in the Underground Railroad. 



Schuylkill Township, 6th mo., 9th. 

Rkspkctkd Cousin; (no year given). 

We received thy letter last fifth day and I tried to collect all 

the information I could concerning my Great Grand Father's 

family. 



Genealogy of the Co ate s Family 151 

The names of the children of Moses Coates as far as I know 
are as follows: Thomas, Moses, Jonathan, Benjamin, and Eliza- 
beth. I do not know whether the daughter was the youngest or 
not. They buried two sons, I do not know their names. I 
think I can give thee names of Grand Father's children in rota- 
tion: Sarah, Susanna, Elizabeth, Moses, John H., Mary, Thomas, 
Priscilla, and Aquilla. 

My Brothers and Sister's names are, Jane, Cyrus, Charles 
T. , and Aquilla. I am the oldest of the family. 

Sarah H. Coates. 
(On back of this letter is written) 
Caleb Coates. From 

Marisville, Sarah H. Coates. 

Chester Co., Pa. 



Penllyn, Feb. 18, 1849. 

Your letter requesting information received. I have ex- 
amined carefully all the records of Guynedd Monthly Meeting 
and find the following accounts of Moses Coates and family: 

Thomas, the eldest son of Moses and Susanna, was born the 
22 day of 12th mo. 1716. Samuel, the second son born 5th of 
6th mo. 1718. Elizabeth, 13th of 1st mo. 1722. 

This is all the record I can find in the record of births and 
deaths. In the minutes of the meeting we have an account of 
some others of the family, viz.: In the 8th mo, 1747, a certificate 
was recorded for Priscilla Coates from Falls Monthly Meeting. 

In the first month, 1751, a Certificate for Aaron Coates from 
Falls Monthly Meeting giving an account that he was a man of 
orderly life and conversation and clear of marriage engagements 
as far as they knew. 

In the 4th mo. 1750. Moses Coates married Elizabeth Avery 
(a widow having children) and the committee appointed for the 
purpose reports that the marriage was orderly accomplished. 

In 1744 Elizabeth Coates married John Mendenhall and a 
certificate was given her to Bradford Monthly Meeting. 



152 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

In 1756, Certificates were given for Aaron Coates and wife 
and Benjamin Coates to Goshen Monthly Meeting. Jonathan 
Coates and wife applied for one at the same time but some diffi- 
culty appearing he did not receive one until he had made the fol- 
lowing acknowledgement. That he was obliged to be concerned 
in the disputes between his Father and Peter Ashton and had on 
that occasion used some ungarded expressions and that he was 
sorry for any trouble Friends had had on his account, which 
paper was received and a Certificate given him to Goshen Meet- 
ing. 

Moses Coates, Sr., resided at Providence, and appears to 
have been an active member of that Meeting as his name fre- 
quently occurs on committees appointed by the Monthly Meeting, 
but it appears that he was disowned in 1756 on account of some 
difficulty in money matters with one Peter Ashton. In the 19th 
of 4 mo. 1760 he made a very full acknowledgement for the same 
which was received by the Meeting. 

Since writing the above I find that Moses and wife brought 
their certificate from Haverford Monthly Meeting in 1726. 

In 1740 Thomas Coates received a Certificate in order to pro- 
ceed in marriage and also one to settle him within the verge of 
Cain Monthly Meeting. 

In 1762 a Certificate was given for Samuel Coates to Brad- 
ford Monthly Meeting. 

I believe that this is the substance of all that is in on record 
in Gwynedd Monthly Meeting Books in relation to the Coates 
family. I do not find William's name mentioned, perhaps he 
died young and his birth and death notjrecorded. 

Respectfully, 

Gko. SpKnckr. 
To Dr. C. Coates. 



PART FOUR. 



Generation of Moses Co cites, Jr., Third Child of Moses and 
Susanna Coates. 

B 3. Moses Coates, Jr., was born 11, 25, 1719. From 
Falls M. Mtg. Records: 

5th rno. 2, 1747, Moses Coates belonging to North Wales 
(Gwjmedd) M. Mtg., and Priscilla Hutchinson, declared their 
intentions of marriage. 

31st of 1st mo., 1747, Gwynedd Monthly Meeting gave 
Moses Coates, Jr., a certificate to Falls Monthly Meeting, in 
order of Marriage with Priscilla Hutchinson, daughter of John 
and Sarah (Burgess) Hutchinson, near Penn Manor, Bucks Co. x 
Pa. 

6th of 8th mo., 1747. Marriage of Moses Coates and Pris- 
cilla Hutchinson reported as accomplished. Their children: 
C. i. Sarah, b. 6, 25, 1748; d. 10, 1, 1S22. 

2. Susanha, b. M: — Amos Rossiter. Res., in Chester Co., Pa. 

Priscilla (Hutchinson) Coates died, when Moses marrried 
Elizabeth (Avery) Evans, a widow with children: 

Gwynedd M. Mtg. Records: 

30th of 2nd mo., 1751. Moses Coates and Elizabeth Evans 
declare their intentions of marriage — she a widow. 

28th of 3rd mo., 1751. Moses Coates"and Elizabeth (Avery) 
Evans are at liberty to proceed in marriage. 

25th of 4th Mo., 1751. Marriage of Moses Coates and 
Elizabeth Evans reported as accomplished. Their children: 

C. 2-1. Phebe, b. 2, 15, 1754; d. 2, 23, 1807. 
2-2. Moses, b. 9, 10, 1756; d. 11, 12, 1825. 
2-3. Mary, b. 2, 16, 1859. M: — Bane, a son, John. 

(153) 



154 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

2-4. John Hutchinson, b. 7, 9, 1761; d, 4, 21, 1S04. Int. Pikeland 

F. B. G. 
2-5. Thomas, b. 1, 3, 1764. A blacksmith. 
2-6. Mahlon, b. 4, iS, [766. 
2-7. Priscilla, b. 9, 25, 1767. 
2-S. Aquilla, b. 7, 1770. 

A tradition is in the family of Priscilla that her mother 
washed the silk hose of the founder, whether she was the family 
laundress is not known, but it was implied that she alone knew 
the art of doing up silk stockings. 

Another tradition is, that Priscilla's batchelor uncle left each 
niece and nephew a silver spoon. 

Moses Coates and wife resided on farm bought by his father 
Moses, in 1754, south of Phoenixville, originally of 550 acres, 
and near " Moore Hall," and now (1905), owned by "Phoenix- 
ville Trotting Park." 

At the home of Moses Coates, Jr., Generals Gates and Mifflin 
and Colonels Davis and Ballard were quartered. 

B 3. C 1. Sarah Coates (Moses, Moses) M: — Thomas, son 
of William and Rachel (Parke) Robinson, 5, 22, 1771. William 
came to Pa., a bachelor, marrying about the year 1728, Rachel 
Parke, who came with her parents from Carlo w, Ireland, in 1731, 
to Chester. 

William Robinson died in 1755. From "Abstracts of Wills," 
Pa., Historical Society: "William Robinson of New Providence, 
Phila. Co., proved June 5th, 1755, mentions wife, Rachel, chil- 
dren: William, Thomas, Nicholas, Mary Elizabeth and Rebecca 
Valentine. 

He had seven children: William, b. 1738. Elizabeth, b. 
1730; d. 1839; M:— Rossiter. Rebekah, b. 1732; M:— 

Thomas (?) Valentine. Mary, b. 1736; d. 1813; M:— Bane. 
Thomas, b. 3, 9, 1739; d. 9, 27, 1822; M:— Sarah Coates. 
Nicholas, b. 1741. Rachel, b. 1743. 

Thomas Robinson was born in 1748, and died 10, 1, 1822. 
He and his wife Sarah (Coates) rented a farm near Phoenixville, 
Pa., on the Schuylkill river where he lived for more than fifty 



Genealogy of the Co ales Family. 155 

years. When he died their sons were well settled on farms of 
their own. 

When the Schuylkill Canal was cut, in the year 1822, there 
was an outbreak af fever in the vacinity which was very fatal, 
when Sarah (Coates) Robinson, her husband and daughter 
Rebeckah, all died within a few weeks of each other. Their 



children: 




D. i. 


Rachel, b. i, iS, 1773; d. 185 . 


2. 


Moses, b. 13, 30, 1774; d. 1855 



M:— Ann Thomas, dau. of 
David and Anna, of Abbington, Pa., had one child who died 
in infancy. 

3. William, b. 4, 25, 1776. Descendants live in vacinity of Port 

Carbon, Pa. M: — Mary Morrison. 

4. Thomas, Jr., b. 11, 22, 1779; d. 1845. M: — Anna Brownson, 

in 1827; moved to 111. 

5. Priscilla, b. 5, 25, 1783; d. 5, 19, 1S35. M:— Joseph Walker, b. 

8, 25, 17S0; d. i, 19, 185S. M:— 5, 1S12, in Gwynedd Meeting. 

6. Sarah, b. 3, 22, 1787; d. in Spring of 1872, UNM. Resided 

after death of her parents with Joseph Walker at Rehobeth, 
and buried in the "Valley" F.B.G. Died of erysipelas. 
She was a most agreeable woman. 
Thomas Robinson died 8, 27, 1S22, an Elder of Gwynedd M. 
M. of Friends. 

7. Rebekah, b. 3, S, 1793; d. io, 10, 1822. 

Moses Robinson, the eldest son, lived in Charlestown Town- 
ship, Chester Co., Pa. Was a surveyor, as well as a farmer, 
and a noted penman. There are Deeds and Wills, and Mar- 
riage Certificates that were written by him in which the hand- 
writing compares favorably with the old-time manuscripts of 
recluse monks that are shown with much pride in Museums 
and Galleries. He was also one of the first farmers to plant 
hedges in the County. 

By kindness of Mrs. Priscilla (Walker) Streets, (compiler 
of Walker Book) , I am indebted for the following account per- 
taiding to Sarah (Coates) Robinson, and other valuable data ex- 
traoted, by permission, from her valuable and interesting book. 

T. C. 

"The father of Thomas Robinso nlived on the other side of 
the river, where Nicholas Robinson, afterward lived at New 



156 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

Providence. One sou of Thomas, sold his farm and moved to 
Ohio in 1825. Another son, William, sold out in 1831, going to 
Port Carbon to live. Moses Robinson retained his farm, and at 
his death, in 1855, it was bequeathed to his wife; at her death 
some years later, it was sold, and that was the last of the name 
in the neighborhood that had known the family for near a century. 

Mention is made in Cope & Futhy 's "History of Chester Co., 
Pa.," of Thomas Robinson, page 93: 

"The Hessian troops passed by Thomas Robinson's home, 
on their passage through Chester County from Brandywine battle- 
field to Philadelphia. A small daughter, Rachel, aged about 
four, stood on the horse-block by her father's door, to gaze at 
the unusual spectacle of marching soldiers in battle array, and 
which gratifying her curiosity, nibbled at a piece of bread she 
held in her small fist. It is said she attracted much attention 
and the soldiers paused from time to time to caress the little 
maid. She gave them bites of her bread as a great favor, and to 
some a kiss was not denied. During this debut of Rachel, her 
father, according to Cope & Futhy, was marching in the van, 
having been siezed and forced to go along with them to show 
them where the river could be forded. According to history, he 
assumed feebleness on the march, and planning to escape with- 
out assisting his country's enemies, took advantage of the dis- 
turbance created when shots were heard from across the river, 
and slipped away unobserved. Arriving home, he found his house 
and stables had been visited by the Hessians, and some of his 
live stock had been taken, though his family had suffered no in- 
jury. 

It is to be regretted that the events of this time were not re- 
corded. A daughter, Sarah Robinson (Aunt Sallie — P. W. 
Streets), had many stories to tell about the Hessian invasion, 
also of the occupying of Valley Forge by the American troops, 
which talks were sufficient recompense for a certain little girl to 
give up play, and hold yarn to be wound in great gray balls. 
She had them from the mouths of her father and mother, and 



Genealogy of the Coates Family 157 

told them with much spirit and attention to details. Unfortun- 
ately the}' are not clear enough in my mind to present them here, 
but there were rides to Philadelphia with escapes from soldiers, 
cups of tea brewed for unexpected guests in military array, small 
boys set on horseback barefooted, to carry notes of invitations to 
some great general's card part}^ etc. 

The Coates family also, had Revolutionary War experience, 
as will be seen in the pages in the Chester County History men- 
tioned previously. There is a handsome table in the possession 
of William B. Walker, of Philadelphia, that came from the 
Coates house, that, if tables could speak, could tell many inter- 
esting tales. Benedict Arnold has eaten his dinner from it, and 
very likely tangled his legs among its carved supports, it having 
more than most tables. He was a week at the house of Moses 
Coates,* and gave a party under the cherry trees "to which Wash- 
ington, though invited did not come/' Generals Gates and 
Mifflin, Colonels Davis and Ballard were also quartered there, 
with a guard of twenty-four men. 

Moses Robinson, son of Thomas, has written some verses 
which can be read in "Lewis Walker, of Chester Valley,' ' by 
P. W. Streets, giving a pleasant picture of the Colonial home of 
his ancestor. The property was in possession of the family until 
about the close of the last century (19th). Isaac Anderson, in 
an article published in "Potter's American Monthly" for Janu- 
ary, 1875, entitled "History of Charlestown," says the Coates 
family were amongst the original settlers of the township. The 
Phoenix Iron Works, now occupy what originally were the 
meadows for pasture of Moses Coates' cows. 

There is a set of silver spoons in existence, bearing the 
initials "S. C." which Sarah Coates had on her marriage, 1771. 

It will be seen that the Hessian General knew what he was 

about when he selected Thomas Robinson to guide them across 

the river. He must have known the ford well, as from his home 

in New Providence he undoubtedly had crossed it many times to 

*Moses Coates, Jr. 



158 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

see Sarah Coates in her Chester County home. For some good 
reason he also chose, what we would consider, the right side of 
the Schuylkill for their new home, and he chose well, as this sec- 
tion of the country is prettily situated, with good views, fine 
farming land, pure water, and to be a Chester County man, was 
then, as now, equal to a patent of nobility in some countries. 

There was, besides, game a-plenty, in the woods, and the 
river full of fish. In the early Spring, shad came up to spawn, 
and were often caught in the Robinson spring-house, swimming 
about among the cans of cream, pots of butter and jars of yeast. 
To make this yeast, in the fall of the year the young folks would 
cross to a small island, where the water was fordable by means 
of stepping stones, and there they would gather the hops grow- 
ing wild, draped about the bushes and trees that adorned it. 
My own father was once carried over by his doting aunts, and I 
believe, came to grief on the return by tumbling in the water, 
for which all received a scolding when they got home. This 
story was told by cousin Sarah (Davis) Robinson, who was of 
the party of hop-pickers. 

Sarah (Coates) Robinson's household must have been well 
looked after, to judge of the piles of home-made linens still ex- 
tant, that has stood the wear of man}^ 3^ears. Some of it is es- 
pecially fine. The patchwork quilts, also, bear comparison with 
the art needlework of the present time, and one of them, besides 
being adorned with garlands of applique work has the maker's 
name, "Priscilla Robinson," embroidered in finest stitching. 
The samplers of the daughters, too, are excellent; they were 
well educated for their time and station. Note books, in which 
favorite poems were copied showing "Tristam Shandy," with 
various odes to death and melancholy was the favorite reading 
of the well-to-do Quaker girl of a century ago. Taken all 
together, I believe that the romantic side of our nature comes 
from this brauch of our family, and had its origin in the elope- 
ment of our Irish ancestors, Rachel Parke, with William Robin- 
son. We also get our large noses from the Robinsons, it is said. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 159 

They were not so handsome as the Walkers, but were good stock, 
amiable, quick witted and intellectual. Moses, a son of Thomas 
and Sarah, was a man of unusual ability. He was a progressive 
farmer, an excellent pensman, a surveyor and a man of culture. 
The deeds and marriage certificates written by him are marvels 
of beautiful script. It is said that when his father took a 
deed to be recorded at West Chester, the Clerk asked, "Who 
wrote this deed ?" "One of my plough boys," was the answer 
of the proud old Quaker. 

In the days in whic I write, to be able to spin and knit, to 
sew, to work the family pedigree on the square of coarse linen, 
that framed, was called a "sampler," were the accomplishments 
that marked the well-bred young woman, as in these days of 
music, painting and the ability to converse in a foreign language, 
go toward the same end. Our grandmothers, at least one Quaker 
grandmother did not dance, though they sometimes sang quaint 
old ballads; but they rode their horses fearlessly, and I am afraid 
were often attempted to "scorch," going to meeting, if father 
and mother were not near. 

Their household duties would appall the girl of today. 
There was mush to make, which is an art in itself, "and what 
they did not eat that day, the queen next morning fried." There 
was soap, both hard and soft, that was evolved with much care 
and ceremony from the wood ashes. There was applebutter, 
that most toothsome relish, and jams, pickles, jellies; the fruits 
for which had to be gathered from wooded-hollow and tangled 
roadside vines in the dewey mornings of early summer. Some- 
times when the weather threatened, the girls would go with rakes 
to help cure the hay, and twice a day came milking-time. What 
with dairy work, baking day, "Seventh-day" scrubbing, spin- 
ning, weaving, and sewing, the old-fashioned girl's time was fully 
occupied, and working among the flower and onion beds was rec- 
reation for the close of the day. But who will say it was not 
sweet and wholesome? If they had not been happy they could 
not have found pleasure in the solemn books they read, nor en- 
J03'm?ut in the woeful poetry they treasured so carefully. 



160 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

"Going to Meeting" was in the nature of a frolic, and when 
they rode down to the Valley to hear a cultivated preacher, or 
journeyed to Radnor once a month, to hear the discipline read, 
we may be sure their thoughts and eyes wandered from the gal- 
lery and Presiding Klders to the handsome, stalwart sons of the 
same who sat on the men's side. The rides home over the hills 
in company with their co-religionists were not entirely given up 
to discussing the sermons or the mystery of the Inner Light. 

B 3. C 2-1. Phebe Coates (Moses, Moses) M: — Samuel 
Lane, son of Edward and Sarah (Richardson). Their children: 

D. l. Sarah, b. n, 12, 1782. 

2. Priscilla, b. 11, 13, 1784. 

3. Mary, b. 12, 2, 1786; d. 1, 21, 1S16. 

4. Edward, b. 1, 15, 1789; d. 8, 10, 185S. 

The following, is among other data, from Airs. Lidie O. 
Priest, of Phoenixville, Pa. Phebe (Coates) and Samuel Lane 
lived at "Bull Tavern," near Valley Forge, for a time. We have 
a wine glass that was used there. It (Bull Tavern) was kept by 
Edward Lane, father of Samuel. Samuel was willed the silver 
shoe buckles, knee buckles, curl buttons and stock buckle from 
his grandfather, Samuel Lane (buried at Evansburg). 

Phoebe Coates was buried in a Friends burying ground near 
the Mont. Co. Almshouse, and where she was buried the grave 
contained so much water that Samuel would not be buried there, 
and he lies in Morris Cemetery, Phoenixville. There is a story 
I remember cousin Sarah Beekley tell about Phebe Coates (her 
grandmother). She was coming home from market on horse- 
back with her money in Saddle-bags, when she was accosted by 
a British soldier, who demanded her money. She told him if he 
wanted it he could work for it, and threw a small reticule, which 
she carried, into the bushes. When he dismounted to go get it, 
she whipped her horse and galloped off, and his horse followed. 
No one claimed it, so she kept it, and Cousin Sarah had some- 
thing (a quilt, I think it was) that was on the horse and is now 
probabh^ in possession of her sou Frank. I have not heard of 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 161 

him for several years, but the last I heard he was at Cedarville, 
Chester Co., Pa. 

B 3. C 2-2. Moses Coaxes (Moses, Moses) M:— Hannah, 
dau. of Mordecai and Elizabeth Moore, 12, 10, 1795. Soon after 
their marriage they moved to Frederick Co., Va. Hannah 
(Moore) Coates produced a certificate from Radnor M. M., dated 
10, 19, 1808, which was received and accepted at Hopewell M. 
M., 9, 9, 1819. 

At Hopewell M. M. held 2nd of 1st Month, 1808. Hannah 
Coates produced a certificate from Radnor M. M. ; dated 19th of 
10th mo., which was read and accepted. 

Women's meeting inform that Hannah Coates requests that 
her daughter Elizabeth, be received into membership. Abel 
Walker and Jonathan Wright are appointed to unite with women 
Friends to visit her. This request was granted 6th of 3rd mo., 
180S. Hannah had a brother John, who was a Physician, and 
spoke sometimes in Meeting. The first time he spoke he was 
dressed in blue coat with brass buttons, buff vest, buckskin knee 
breeches and fair leather topped boots. After sitting down, Nichol- 
as Wain arose and said, "Well done Lappel," and sat down. 
Hannah also had a brother who was a Circuit Judge. Their 
children: 

D. i. Eliza, b. 5, 19. 1797; d. 3, 11, 1S83. 

Eliza married William Cowgill, of Frederick Co., Va. , 9, 18, 
1814. William, b. 3, 5, 1788, and diedl, 27, 1834, int. at Hope- 
well F.B.G. 

At Hopewell M. M. held 4th of 5th Mo., 1815. Women's 
Meeting informs that Elizabeth Cowgill, formerly Coates, hath 
accomplished her marriage contrary to discipline, and it is their 
judgment that a Testimony be given against her. Edward 
Walker and Jacob Rees are appointed to prepare one. 

At Hopewell M. M. held 8th of 6th Mo., 1815. A testi- 
mony was prepared against Eliza Cowgill, formerely Coates. At 
the same meeting, William Cowgill, a member of Clear Creek 
M. M., who has settled within the limits of this, and has accom- 



162 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

plished his marriage contrary to discipline, John Wright and 
Jacob Rees are appointed to write to that Meeting. 

The next Meeting this Comniitte reports the} 1 - had written 
to Friends of Clear Creek Meeting. 

At Hopewell M. M., held 9th of 9th mo., 1819. The com- 
mittee in case of Elders propose John I^ee, Isaac Pidgeon, to that 
station, and women's Meeting propose Phebe Cobourn, Hannah 
Coates, and Mar>^ George, which was united with. 

At Hopewell M. M., held 8th of 6th mo., 1820. Women's 
Meeting inform that Eliza Cowgill requests to be reinstated and 
requests that her daughter Hannah, might be admitted into 
membership with Friends. This request was granted 4th of 7th 
mo., 1822. 

At Hopewell M. M., held 7th of 7th mo., 1836. Women's 
Meeting produce a certificate for Hannah Cowgill, to join her to 
Radnor M. M., Delaware Co., Pa., which was approved. 

Children of Eliza and William Cowgill: 
E. i. Hannah Moore, b. 1 1, 16, 1S16; d. 6 } 3, 1870. 

2. Catharine Ann, b. 2, 25, 1824; d. 1, 9, 1890. 

3. Moses Coates, b. 12, n, 1S25; d. 7, 31, 1848. UNM. 

After William Cowgill's death, Eliza returned to the vicinity 
of Norristown, Mont. Co., Pa. The Cowgill family came to Pa. 
with Win. Peun, in the "Welcome" in 1692, and settled in Kent 
Co., Del. 

B 3. C 2-3. Mary Coatks (Moses, Moses) M:— John Bane, 
had one son: D. 1. John. No dates. The family resided for 
a time in Phila., Pa. Mary (Coates) Bane ended her time with 
Priscilla Hutchinson Coates, in the early 40' s. 

B 3. C 2-4. John Hutchinson Coatks (Moses, Moses) M: 
Hannah Longstreth, dau. of John, 6, 22, 1790, in Pikeland Meet- 
ing. Resided in Phoenixville, Pa. H. L. C, died 1, 8, 1851, 
aged 82 years. Int. at Pikeland F. B. G. Their children: 

D. 1. Sarah Hutchinson, b. 4, S, 1791; d. u, 5, 1863. UNM. 

2. Jane Longstretch, b. 12. 27, 1793; d. n, 1864, Int. at Pikeland 

F. 15. G. 

3. Cyrus, b. 2, 25, 1795; d. 5, 31. Int. at Pik^l.md F. B. G. 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 163 

4. Charles L., b. 3, 15, 1797; d. UNM. 

5. Hannah Longstreth, b. 10, 9, 179S. 

6. Aquilla, b. io, 30, 1799, in Chester Co., Pa.; died in Wilmington, 

Ohio, 8, 21, 1875. E 1. John Hutchinson, son of Aquilla, 
died 7, 13, 1852, aged 26 years. 

B 3. C 2-5. Thomas Coatks (Moses, Moses) M:— Rachel 
Wood. Their children: 

D. 1. Jane, b. 4, 7, 1789; d. 10, 12, 1790. 

2. Sarah, b. 9, 2, 1791, in Schuylkill Township, Chester Co.; died 
1841, of cancer. Her mother died when Sarah was four years 
old, in same township in which she was born. Thomas had a 
school in his residence near Phoenixville. From Bradford 
M, Mtg. Records: 10, 12, 17S1, Thomas Coates, a minor, cer- 
tificate from Gwynedd, dated 7, 31, 1781, 

B 3. C 2-7 Priscilla Coates (Moses, Moses) M: — Jonathan 
Evans, of Clearfield Co., Pa., 5, 2, 1797, at public Meeting in 
Providence M. H., Mont. Co., Pa. Jonathan was a minister in 
Society of Friends. Children: 

F. 1. Sarah, b. ; d. 8, 11, 1844. Int. West Branch F. B. G. Pris- 

cilia was clerk of M. Mtg. and Quarterly Mtg. for many years. 
Died at Grampian Hills, Clearfield, Pa. 

Marriage Certificate of Priscilla Coates and Jonathan Evans. 

WHEREAS, Jonathan Evans, son of Josiah Evans, 
of Tredivfrin Towhship, in the County of Chester and 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and Priscilla Coates, daugh- 
ter of Moses Coates, of Township of Charlestown, in said County, 
having declared their intentions of Marriage with each other be- 
fore several Monthly Meetings of the people called Quakers at 
Gwynedd, according to the good order used amongst them; and 
having consent of parents concerned, their said proposal of Mar- 
riage was allowed of by said meeting. 

Now these are to certify whom it may concern, that for the 
full accomplishment of their said intentions this Second Day of 
fifth Month in the year of our Lord, 1793, they the said Jona- 
than Evans and Priscilla Coates appeared in a public Meeting of 
said People for that appointed at Providence in the County of 



164 



Genealogy of the Co ales Family. 



Montgomery, in the said Commonwealth 
present: 



William Jacobs 
Elizabeth High 
Elizabeth Acre 
Issac Starr 
Nancy Starr 
Issac T}^son 
Rachel Robinson 
Anna Starr 
Hannah Moore 
Sarah Longstreth 
Grace Miller 
Elizabeth Starr 
Letitia Griffith 
Edward Davis 
Elizabeth Griffith 
Diadema Griffith 
Ann Norton 
Israel Jacobs 
Ann Frances 
Elizab'h Pennypacker 
Amy Starr 
Elizabeth Robinson 
Elizabeth Cox 
Benjamin Starr 



Aaron Wood 

Sarah Thomas 

Mary Richardson 

Moses Robinson 

Theophilus Davis 

John Longstreth, Jr. 

Daniel High 

Martha Lookings 

Hannah Jacobs 

Mary Thomas 

Hannah Wand 

Elizabeth Jacobs 

Mary Rossiter 

Daniel Rossiter 

Joseph Starr 

Moses Hobson 

John Jacobs 

Mary Jones 

Jesse Jacobs 

Nicholas Robinson 

Joseph Cox 

Abel Thomas 

Esther Smedley 



* Witnesses 

Jonathan Evans 
PriscilIvA Evans 
Mary Jacobs 
Esther Bailey 
Sarah Cox 
Phebe Hobson 
Thomas Lewis 
John Richards 
Mary Longstreth 
Nancy Longstreth 
John Davis 
Beulah Stanley 
John H. Coates 
Edward Thomas 
Zachariah Davis 
John Longstreth 
Moses Coates 
Susanna Coates 
Phebe Lane 
Thomas Robinson 
Hannah Coates 
Rachel Coates 
Samuel Lane 
Thos. Coates 
Aquilla Coates 
Polly Rossiter 



Joseph Coarade 
Uwchlan Monthly Meeting Minutes, 1776-1795.: 
6th of 5th mo., 1790. John Hutchinson Coates, son of 
Moses Coates, and Hannah Longstreth declare their intentions of 
marriage. 

10th of 6th mo. , 1790. John Hutchinson Coates and Hannah 
Longstreth are at liberty to proceed in marriage, he having pro- 
duced a certificate from Gwynedd Monthly Meeting. Also her 
Father's Consent in writing, the other parents being present con- 
senting. 

8th of 7th mo., 1790. Marriage of John Hutchinson Coates 



Geneaology of the Coates Family. 



165 



and Hannah Longstreth reported as being accomplished. 

WHEREAS, John Hutchinson Coates, Son of Moses Coates, 
of the Township of Charlestown, in the County of Chester and 
Commonwealth of Penns3 ? lvania, and Hannah Longstreth, Daugh- 
ter of John Longstreth of same place, having declared their In- 
tentions of Marriage with each other before Several Monthly 
Meetings of the People called Quakers, at Uwchlan in the said 
Count} 7 , according to the good order used amongst them, and 
having Concent of Parents concerned, their said proposal of Mar- 
riage w T as allowed of by the said Meeting. 

NOW These are to Certify whom it may concern, That for 
the full accomplishing their said Intentions, This 22d day of the 
Sixth Month, in the year of our Lord, 1790, They, the said John 
Hutchinson Coates and Hannah Longstreth appeared in a Pub- 
lic Meeting of the said People at Pikeland. Witnesses: 

John Hutchn. Coates. 
Hannah Coates. 
Rebekah Thomas Phebe Lane 

Phebe Jacobs Samuel Lane 

Rebecca McVeaugh Sarah Yarnal 



Ann Rogers 
John Lewis 
Grace Lewis 
Jonathan Rogers 
Isaac Jacobs 
Aaron Dunkin 
Sarah Dunkin 
Hannah Moore 
Eliza Moore 
Isaac Starr 
Rachel Starr 
Joseph Connade 
Jesse Jacobs 
Isaac Taylor 
Israel Dowdall 
Anna Coates 
Susanna Dunkin 
Israel Coates 
William Lightfoot 
Mary Lightfoot 



Sarah Sterr 

Phebe Jacobs 

Mary Turk 

Israel Davis 

Theophilus Davis 

Joseph Starr 

Isaac Starr 

Rebekah Russell 

Benjn. Longstreth 

Sarah Longstreth 

Joseph Starr 

Thomas Robinson 

Sarah Robinson 

Rebekah Starr 

Phebe Coates 

Prisey Coates 

Susanna Coates 



Rachel Robinson 
William Longstreth 
John Coates 
Solomon Fussell 
Moses Coates 
John Longstreth 
Jane Longstreth 
Sarah Longstreth 
Rachel Coates 
Sarah Starr 
Mary Longstreth 
Ann Longstreth 
Jane Longstreth 
Ann Starr 
James Starr 
Joseph Longstreth 
Aquilla Coates 



166 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

B 3. C 2-8. A&uilxa Coates (Moses, Moses). Produced a 
Certificate from Gwynedd M. M., dated 1, 29, 1799. The above 
certificate was produced at Hopewell M. M., held 2, 8, 1802. 
Aquilla married Rachel Pidgeon, born in Virginia, 2, 25, 1801, 
dau. of Isaac and Elizabeth H. Pidgeon, 5, 15, 1823. Their 
children: 

D. i. Isaac Lewis, b. 3, 10,1824. Disappearad, likely dead. 

2. John Hutchison, b. 9, 4, 1825; d. 7, 13, 1852. 

3. Benjamin Franklin, b. 6, 23, 1827; d. 5, 6, 1899, at Portsmouth, 

where he was born. 

4. William Pidgeon, b. 3, 7, 1S30; d. 5, 27, 1S32. 

5. Cyrus Longstreth, b. 3, 3> l8 33; d - I0 > 3°> l8 3 8 - 

6. George Jenkins, b. 9, 18, 1837; d. 11, 15, 1S38. 

7. Sarah Elizabeth, b. 1,27, 1840. M:— Childs, Res., Butler, 

Yates Co., Mo. 

8. Mary Stone, b. io, 17, 1842, at Wilmington, Ohio. M: — In Ur- 

bana, Ohio, S, 17, 1867, to William Helps, haberdasher, born, 
at Trumbridge, England, son of John and Eliza Helps, of Ur- 
bana, O. Res., 114 West Ward St., Urbana, O. No children. 
Most of the children of Aquilla Coates reside in Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

At Hopewell Monthly Meeting held 5th of 9th Month, 1822. 
A Certificate from Uwchlan Monthly Meeting dated 4th, of 7th 
Month, 1822. for Aquilla Coates, was read and received. Taken 
from Marriage Certificates of Hopewell Monthly Meeting,. Fred- 
erick County, Virginia. At Hopewell Monthly Meeting, held 
8th of 4th Month, 1824. Hopewell Preparative Meeting informs 
that Aquilla Coates and Rachel, his wife, request a certificate 
for themselves and their son, Isaac Lewis Coates, to Center 
Monthly Meeting, Ohio. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. Rachakl Robinson (Sarah, Moses, Moses) 
M: — William Davis, a hatter, of Chester Co., Pa. M: — in Chester 
Friends Meeting. Rachel was b. 1773, died 185 . Their chil- 
dren: 

E. 1. Sarah, M: — Henry Robinson, lived during her married life in 

Schuylkill Haven, Pa. Had twelve children, names not given. 
Died in 1888, in her 88th year, born in 1801. 
2. William Swaffer, b. 1803; d. 2, 21, 1887, on his farm at "Bell 



Geneaology of the Coates Family, 167 

Bank," Lancaster Co., Pa. M: — Catharine En^le, 9, io, 1829, 
both of Chester, Del. Co., Pa. Catharine was dau. of Joseph 
and Susan (Hill) Engle. Their children, (over to generation 

F). 

3. Elenor, b. 1S05; d. young. 

4. Priscilla, b. 1S06. M: — Ferman Borden, resided in Schuylkill 

Haven, Pa. When her husband died she went to a Western 
State, where she died. Had four children, no names given, 

5. Mary b. 1S0S; d. 1892. 

6. Hannah, d. 1903, in her 91st year, she and Mary always resided 

in or near Chester, Pa. 

7. Susanna, b. 1S10; d. 1848. M: — John Valentine, son of Micajah. 

Resided in Chichester Township, Del., Co., Pa. Died in her 
35th year. Their children: F. 1. Ellen, M:— John P. Griffith 
M,D. 3 of Washington, D.C. Children: G. 1. William. 2 
Percy, both died young of scarlet fever. 3. Joseph Howard 
M: — Mary, dau. of Jas. Patterson, Lan. Co., Pa. He is Lieu 
tenant in Standing Army, U.S. Children: — H. 1. James P. 
b. it, 24, 1899. 2. Ellen, b. 1, 30, 1903. Born in Philippine 
Islands. First white child born in Malabang. 2. Edward, d., 
in South. 3. Joseph W., Res. Grand Rapids, Mich. UNM. 4. 
Davis, Res. in Washington, D.C. 5. Son, no name given; died; 
was married; left a child, who resides at Norwood, Pa. 

B 3. C 1. D 4. Thomas Robinson, Jr. (Sarah, Moses, 
Moses) M: — Ann Robinson, in Chester Co., Pa., and moved to 
Ohio in 1825, and to Illinois in 1841. Ann died in 1847. Their 
children: 

E. 1. Jane, b. 1811; d. 1820. 

2. Joseph Walker, b. 1S13; d. 1SS9. M:— Ruth Boyne. Their child: 

F. 1. Mary, M:— Elmer Meredith. Their children: G. 1. 
Ethel. 2. Lillian. 3. William. 4. Owen. 

3. Charles B., b. 1S15. M:— Elizabeth Scott. Children: F. 1. 

Thomas, M: — Rebecca Grewell. 2. Theodore, M:— Elizabeth 
Dorsey. 3. Oscar, M:— Mary Miller. 4. Olive, M: — Charles 
Dallis. 5. Frank. 6. Russell, died 1890. 

4. Rebecca, b. 1S17; d. 1890. M:— Joseph Russell. Their children: 

F. 1. William, M: — Carrie Schenk. 2. Susan. 3. Anna, M: 
Berton Stoops. 4. Charles. 

5. Thomas Chalkley, b. 1819. 

6. Emilt, b. 1824; d. 1883. 

7. William, b. 1829. 



168 Geneaology of the Coates Family. 

B 2. C 1. D 5. Priscilla Coates Robinson. (Sarah, 
Moses, Moses) M: — Joseph Walker, son of Isaac, born at Reho- 
beth, Tredyfferin Township, Chester Co., Pa., 8, 24, 1770. Died 
at same place, 1, 19, 1820. M:— at Gwynedd Meeting, 5th Mo., 
1812. Their children: 

E, i. Lewis, b. 1813; d. 1813. 

2. Isaac, b. 1814; d. 1839. A young man of much promise. Died 

of pneumonia. 

3. Thomas R., b. 1818; d. 1875. M:— Mary Banes. Child: F. 1. 

Joseph Jeans, M: — Florence A. Davidson, of Dobbs Ferry, 
N. Y., lo, 6. 1Q04 

4. Moses, b. 12, 9, 1S17, d, 2, 24 1870. M:— in 1849, Sarah S. Davis, dau. 

of Elenor (Stephens) Child: F. 1. Ellen D., M:— William Ram- 
say, son of Saml. and Sarah, 1877, Children: G. 1. Joseph 
D., b. 1878. 2. Sara, b. 1880; d. 1SS1. 3. Harold,£b. 1882. 4. 
Charles D., b. 1885. 

5. Mary, b. 1820. UNM. Res. with her brother at "Rehobeth'' 

(1S96). 

6. Sarah, b. 7, 31, 1821; d. 7, 31, 1849. 

7. Hananiah, b. 1823. M: — Susan Katon. 

Priscilla and Joseph Walker, with Six of their children are 
buried in the graveyard at the top of the hill. Joseph and Pris- 
cilla residing near the Meeting House, all the stranger Friends 
came to their house, where a hearty welcome was always accord- 
ed them. In their day the Friend's preachers traveled all over 
the country on Mission work, and sometimes in carriages, some- 
times on horse-back and whenever they came to the Valley they 
turned aside to make their home with Joseph and Priscilla 
Walker for a few days. The old residence ' 'Rehobeth,' ' has 
been changed much in architecture since it was occupied by those 
two persons. During the Revolutionary War the middle part of 
the house was at one time occupied by General Lafayette, as 
headquarters. 

B 3. C 1. D 5. E 3. Thomas Robinson Walker (Sarah, 
Priscilla, Moses, Moses). Was born in Radnor Township, Dela- 
ware Co., Pa., 8, 2, 1816, died at his home in Tredyffrin Town- 
ship, same Co., 7, 29, 1875. He married, 4, 14, 1841, Mary, 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 169 

dau. of James and Elizabeth (Priest man) Baynes. Their chil- 
dren: 

F. i. Priscilla, died in infancy. 

2. Elizabeth Baynes, b. 5, 8, 1S43. M: — Joseph Heacock. 

3. Isaac Priestman, b. 4, 29, 1845. M: — Ella K. Eckman. 

4. James Baynes, b. 12, 16, 1846. M:— Martha M. Abraham. 

5. Priscilla* b. S, 27, 1848. M:— 9, 7, 1875 to Dr. Thomas Hale 

Streets, U.S.N., son of Edward and Mary E. (Griffiin) Streets, 
of Delaware. 

6. Fannie Baynes, b. 6, 25, 1850. Now resides (1S96) with her 

sister Elizabeth, at Wyncote, Pa. She was for several years 
a teacher at Friend's Central School, Phila., Pa., but rheumatic 
gout compelled her to give up her position. 

7. Joseph, died in infancy. 

8. Thomas, died in infancy. 

9. Mary Alice, died in infancy. 

B 3. C 1. D 5. E 4. Moses Walker (Priscilla, Sarah, 
Moses, Moses) Born in Radnor Township, Del. Co., Pa., 10, 9, 
1817, died at his home in Upper Merion, Montgomery Co., Pa., 
2, 24, 1870. M:— 1849, Sarah S., dau. of Joseph and Elenor 
(Stephens) Davis. Moses Walker and wife went to live on a 
farm which he purchased from the estate of James Barry, which 
land lies near and overlooks the Schuylkill River near Merion 
Station on the Reading R. R. Here they resided until the death 
of Moses Walker. The property is now (1896) owned by the 
widow, who lives here with her only remaining child, whose hus- 
band, William Ramsey, farms the place. Their children were: 

F. 1. Ellen Davis, Married William Ramsey. 

2. Lewis, b. 1856; d. 1868. 

3. Sarah, b. 1S635 d. 1874. 

B 3. C 1. D 5. E 7. Hananiah Walker (Priscilla, Sarah, 
Moses, Moses). Born at "Rehobeth," 1823, in Triedyffrin 
Township, Chester Co., Pa.; died at his home in Phila., 4, 16, 
1872. Married 1852, Susan, dau. of William Keaton, of Phila. 
He learned the trade of brick-layer, and and after working at it 
for some time in Phila., he joined it to the occupaiion of builder. 
♦Compiler of book on Genealogy of Walker Family. 



170 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

He died suddenly of pneumonia, and was buried at the Valley 
Graveyard, with the honors of the Society of Odd Fellows, of 
which he was a prominent member. His widow and two sons 
reside in Phila. Their children: 

F. t. William Keton, M:— Kate Garby, had one son, William, who 
died in infancy. 

2. Joseph, died of consumption. 

3. Lewis Keton, M:— Sarah Jane Wright. 

4. Alary, died of consumption. 

B 3. CI. D 5. E 8. Joseph Walker (Priscilla, Sarah, 
Moses,. Moses). Born at "Rehobeth" Triedyflrin Township, 
Chester Co., Pa., 4, 30, 1828. M:— 6, 11, 1863, Ellen Louisa, 
dau. of Charles and Mary (Dilworth) Wells at her father's house 
in Tredyffrin, Joseph Walker, the youngest son of Joseph and 
Priscilla lived at the homestead with his father and sister Mary, 
until the death of Joseph Walker, when he inherited the prop- 
erty according to the conditions of his father's will. After his 
marriage he made some improvements at (, Rehobeth," and as- 
sisted by his wife he has there dispensed generous hospitality to 
their many friends and acquaintances. During the time of the 
Quarterly Meeting in August, they have frequently entertained 
as many as fifty. He is an enthusiast on the subject of the old 
house in which he first saw the light, and delights in tales of 
"auld lang syne." 

Ella Walker died very suddenly of pneumonia on 12, 31, 
1889. She was generous and warm-hearted, and always ready 
to assist her neighbors in distress and join them in their pleas- 
ures. It may truly be said of her, that her place in the neigh- 
borhood has never been filled. They had two sons: 

E. 1. Charles Wells, b. 12; 27, 1S67. Married 1, 12, 1895, at Church 
of the Advent, Phila., Marion Graves Coppuck, dau. of Mal- 
cum M. Coppuck. They reside in Downingtown. 

2. Joseph Jeans, b. 11, 4, 1871. Graduated at Swarthmore College. 

In 1898 was employed by Jesse Wagner Walker, in Shifflee 
Bridge Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

3. Ellen L., d. 12, 31, 18S9 

B 3. C 1. D 5, E 3. F 2. Elizabeth Banes Walker 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 171 

(Thomas R., Sarah, Priscilla, Moses, Moses). Born in Whitpaiu 
Township, Montgomerj' Co., Pa., 5, 8, 1844. Married at her 
father's residence in Tredyffrin Township, Chester Co., Pa., 7, 
5, 1S77, Joseph Heacock, son of Joseph and Esther (Hallowell) 
Heacock, of Chelton Hills, Mont. Co., Pa. Elizabeth W., wife of 
Joseph Heacock, has been a teacher since she was eighteen }'ears 
old. She was a principal of the "Girls' Intermediate" at the 
Friends School at 1 5th and Race Sts. , Phila. , Pa. some years before 
her marriage, since which time, with the assistance of her sister- 
in-law, Annie Heacock, has established the "Chelton Hills 
School," a successful educational establishment in close prox- 
imity to her home. Joseph Heacock is a florist, who has achieved 
success in the cultivation of roses and other choice flowers. Their 
children: 

F. i. Fannie Walker, b. 1S78; d. 1S79. 

2. James Walker, b. 7, 3, 1S79. Was 6 ft 4 in. on his 17th birthday. 

3 Esther, b, 12, 3, 18S0. 

4. Mary Baynes, b. 1882; d. 18S3. 

5. Priscilla Walker, b. 7, 16, 1SS5. 

6. Edward Rockhill, b. 8, 10, 1SS6. 

B 3. C 1. D 5. E 3. F 3. Isaac Priestly Walker (Thomas 
R., Sarah, Priscilla, Moses, Moses). Was born in Whitpain 
Township, Mont. Co., Pa. M:— 2, 12, 1873, Ella M., dau. of 
Joseph and Mary Ann Eckman, of Columbia, Pa. Isaac P., and 
Ella (Eckman) Walker own a farm at Merlin, Chester Co., Pa. 
He has occupied a position at Girard College for several years. 
He was a volunteer in 192nd Reg., of Penna. Volunteers, also in 
the 42nd Reg. of Militia, under Captain John Davis, in 1863, 
leaving school to enlist on both occasions. Their children as fol- 
lows: 

F. I. Percy Eckman, b. 1874. 

2. Emily Eckman, b. 1876; d. 3. mo. 7, 1879, of scarlet fever. 

3. Fanny Baynes, b. 12, 5, 1882. 

4. Thomas Robinson, b. 1883; d. 1883, 

B 3. C 1. D 5. E 3. F 4. James Baynes Walker (Thomas 
R., Sarah, Priscilla, Moses, Moses) M:— 10, 3, 1873, Martha M., 
dau. of James and Susan (Eastburn) Abraham, of Montgomery 



172 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Co., Pa. James B. Walker, after graduating at Friends Central 
School, Phila., was graduated in Medicine at Penn University, in 
1872, and in Philosophy in University of Penna. in 1874. Was 
resident physician from 1872 to 1873; visiting physician 1876 to 
1893; Professor of Practice of Medicine, in Women's Medical 
College, Penn., 1879-1890; President of American Climatological 
Association, 1896, etc. Practices his profession in Philadelphia 
and vicinity. Resides at 1617 Green St., Phila. Their children: 
G. I. Alice Mary, b. 10, 29, 1867; d. 4, 1, 1S7S. 

2. Helen Duer, b. 9, 12, 1879. 

3. Mary Baynes, b. 1, 8, 1881. 

4. James Abraham, b. 12, 4, 1885. 

B 3. C 2-1. D 1. Sarah Lane (Phebe, Moses, Moses) M:— 
George Christman. Children: 

E. 1. George. 2. Sophia, M:— Michener. 3. Priscilla, M:— Bing- 

aman. Resided at Coventry, Chester Co., Pa. Priscilla, died 

1,1905. Their children: F. 1. Sallie. 2. Phebe. 3. Lidie. 

4. Emma. 5. Christman. 
B 3. C 2-1. D 2. PRISCILT.A Lane (Phebe, Moses, Moses) M: 
James Irvin. Their children: 

E. 1. Sarah, M:— Abraham Beekley. Child: F. 1. Frank, M:— 

Res. at Cedarville, Chester Co., Pa. 

2. Phebe, M:— James Essex. Children: G. 1. James. 2. Lane. 

3. William, died at Soldiers' Home, Erie, Pa. 

4. John, UNM. Is at Reading R. R. Terminal, Phila., Pa. 

5. James, M:— Sarah Scofield. Children: F. 1. Mary, M:— 1st, 

Nathan Brown, 2nd, Norris. Children: G. 1. Thomas 
Brown. 2. Anna Norris. F. 2. Frank, M:— Rebecca Strunk, 
1st, and 2nd, Albina Mclllesmy. Frank's children: G. 1. Anna. 
2. Helen. 3. Alfred. 4. Everett. 5. Dunton. F. 3. Samuel, 
M:— Rebecca Snyder. Children: G. 1, Julia. 2. Anna. 3. Ethel 
4. James. 5. Norris. 6. Nathan. 7. Frank. F. 4. Benjamin- 
M: — Lillian John. 

B 3. C 2-1. D 3. Mary Lank. (Phebe, Moses, Moses) M:— 
John Buckwalter. Children: 

E. 1. Jacob, b. 1, 29, 1809. 

2. Phebe, b. 2,9, 1811, d. young. 

3. Elizabeth, b. 3, 6, 1813; d. 1, 25, 1S76. 

4. Sarah, 10, 15, 1815; died young. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 173 

B 3, C 2-1. D 4. Edward Lank (Phebe, Moses, Moses) M: 
Magdelena Roberts. Children: 

E. i. Rebecca, b. 4, 4, 1814; d. i, 4, 1S96, UNM. Left her money to 

"Old Sweeds" Church, near Bridgeport, Pa. 

2. Eliza Ann, b. 7, I, 1S1S. M:— Wright. Children: F. 1. Ida, 

M: — Joel Harley, have a son. F. 2. Henrietta, M: — , has a 
daughter. All reside at Trapp, Chester Co., Pa. (1905). 

3. Samuel b. 1, 19, 1821; d. UNM. Drowned in Canal at Bridge- 

port, Pa. 

4. Phebe, b. 11, 17, 1824; d. 12, 15, 1S24. 

B 3. C 2-1. D 3. E 1. Jacob Buckwai/ter (Mary, Phebe, 
Moses, Moses) M: — Esther Clare. Children: 

F. 1. Mary C, M:— Isaac Dennis. Children: G. 1. Jacob Franklin. 

2. Rettie Olive. 3. Mary Esther. Res., 741 Franklin Ave., 
Reading, Pa. 

2. Henrietta Johnson. 

3. Isaac Pennypacker. 

B 3. C 2-1, D 3. E 3. Elizabeth Buckwai/ter (Mary, 
Phebe, Moses, Moses) M: — Matthias Pennypacker. Children: 

F. 1. Eliah, b. 10, 13, 1S35. Went West, is probably in Charles 
Wheeler Mix Co., Dakota. 
2. Rebecca Lane, b. 9, S, 1S37. M: — Edwin Price, Res., 118 Mul- 
berry St., Lancaster, Pa. Was a volunteer nurse during the 
war of the Rebellion, and did efficient, faithful and long ser- 
vice in the Army of the Potomac, Va., and after the 
Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., and became a "Mother" to many 
a sick and dying soldier, with the prayer of thankfulness 
from many a passing soul. Blessed is such a soul, of God- 
given worth. Children: G. 1. Cora. 2. George E., M.D., M: 
Myrtle Clark, Res., 1S10 Tioga St., Tioga, Pa. F. 3. Mary 
Elizabeth, b. 1, 13, 1S40; d. 2, 22, 1902, M: — Thomas Grover, b. 
12, io, 1840, son of Thomas J. and Eliza (Miles) Grover. 
Thomas, was Recorder of Deeds of Chester Co., Pa. from 1896 
to 1899. Their children: G. 1. Lidie Olivia, b. 11,16,1867. 
M:— Harvey S. Priest, 4, 12, 1892; b. 7, 28, 1S65; d. 5, 27, 1899. 
2. John Henry, b. 10, 5, 1S71, M: — Mary Umstad, dau. of Dr. 
Henry and Reiff. Their children: H. 1. George, b. 9, 16, 
189S. 2. Olivia Pennypacker, b. 5, 2o, 1900. 3. Mary Elizabeth 
b. ii, 5, 1902. G. 3. Robert Pennypacker, b. n, 15, 1S79. F- 
4. Margaret Rossiter, b. 8, 18, 1S42; d. S, 25, 1861. 5. Melissa 
Buckwalter, b. 10, 29, 1846; d. 10, 4, 1S6S. M:— William Wis- 
ler. ,One child: F. 1. William; b. 9, 6, 1867; d. 7,23,1868- 



174 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Susanna Olivia, b. 5, 26, 1S47. M: — 1st, William Kane, 2nd, 
William Bitting, d. 5, 19, 1900. The widow resides 401 Gay 
St., Phoenixville, Pa. 
Mary Elizabeth, and descendants, who are dead are all 
buried in Morris Cemetery, Phoenixville, Pa. The above is from 
kindness of Mr. Lidie O. Priest, who again says: My grandmother, 
Elizabeth Pennypacker, and Aunt Melissa Wisler, were nurses 
during the Civil War, and Aunt Rebecca Lane Price was a volun- 
teer nurse at Gettysburg and other places. Her accounts of her 
experiences are very interesting. 

Bridgeport, Pa., Dec. 2, 1904. 
Euza C. Walker. 

Dear Madam: — Yours of 12, 2, at hand, and noted. "Coates 
Hill," Bridgeport, was called after my grandfather, Septimus 
Coates, the son of John Coates, who was the sou of a widow who 
emigrated to this country with two sons, one of whom married 
Daniel Pegg's daughter whose father was a brick-maker in what 
is now called Richmond, Phila. 

My two uncles, Samuel and John spelled their names 
Coates. I found my grandfather's will, where he signed his 
name, I mean grandfather three removes back. He signed it 
Coats. The widow who came to this county with two sons, was a 
widow of a Coats Cotton Manufacturer in England, and if you look 
at Coats spool cotton you will find they spell it same as I, my father 
said it was right. 

My grandfather owned a great tract of land here reaching 
from low water-mark Schuylkill, to the old Gulf road. The 
middle tract, which I own one-half of "Coats Hill" is still in my 
name. Very truly, 

Samuel Coates. 

B 3. C 2-2. D 1. E 1. Hannah Moore Cowgill (Eliza, 
Hannah, Moses, Moses) M: — David Walker, of TredyfTriu Town- 
ship, Chester Co., Pa., 10, 27, 1841. He was the son of Han- 
aniah and Jane (Havard) Walker, and resided on a farm in same 
Township. David was born, 10, 8, 1818; d. 5, 13, 1889. Their 
children: 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 175 

E. i. Eliza Cowgill, b. 8, 15, 1842. UNM. 

2. Ella Virginia, b. 2. 20, 1850. 

3. Winfield, b. 4, 29, 1852; d. 11, 24, 1876, of typhoid fever. 

4. Lewis, b. 8, 14, 1S60. UNM. 

B 3. C 2-2. D 1. E 2. Catharine Ann Cowgill (Eliza, 
Hannah, Moses, Moses) M:— Isaac B. Stokes, 4, 4, 1850. Their 
children: 

F. 1. Mary Eliza, b. 3, 5, 1851; died in infancy. 

2. William Cowgill, b. 10, 29, 1852. M: — Nellie Hunsiker, dau. of 

John M. and Fannie H., 1, 7, 1903. 

3. Anna Mickle, b. 4, 13, 1858; d. in infancy. 

B3. C 2-2. D 1. El. F 2. Ella Virginia Walker (Han- 
nah, Eliza, Moses, Moses) M:— 10, 19, 1875, Edward Bright 
Conard, son of Joseph and Eliza (Bright) Conard, of Port Ken- 
nedy, Montgomery Co., Pa., at the residence of her father. They 
reside at the Conard Homestead (1905). Their children: 

G. 1. Winfield Walker, b. 11, 11, 1876. M:— Mary Kemble, dau. of 

Hannah S. and the late Jacob B. Walker, formerly of Queen 
Anne Co., Maryland, 4, 8, 1903. He is a graduate of Friends 
Central School in Phila. 1893, and Penn University in 1897. 

2. Eliza Cowgill, b. 22, 9, 1879. M:— at the home of the bride's 

parents, near Port Kennedy, Mont. Co., Pa., 11, 2, 1904, ander 
care of Radnor M. M. of Friends, Jacob Beidler Walker, for- 
merly of Queen Anne Co., Md. 

3. Juanita, b. 11, 23, iSSi; d. n, 23, 1S92. 

B 3. C 2-4. D 2. Jane Coates (John Hutchinson, Moses, 
Moses") M: — B. Franklin Haycock. Their children: 

E. 1. Thomas Elwood. 2. Hannah, M:— Beck. 3. Amelia. 4. 
Ellen. All the above reside in Jackson Co., Iowa. 

B 3. C 2-8. D 3. E 3. Benjamin Franklin Coates (Aquillla, 
John Hutchinson, Moses, Moses) M: — in Eaurence Co., Ohio, 
5, 6, 1857, Elizabeth J. Patterson, b. at West Union, Ohio, 12, 11, 
1833, dau. of John and Cecelia (Prater) Patterson. In early life 
he taught school. Graduated at Ohio, and Jefferson Medical Col- 
leges, Phila., Pa. Practiced Medicine at West Union. Was State 
Senator at beginning of Civil War. Was Lieutenant Colonel and 
Colonel of 91st O.V.I., and Brigadier General. At close of war 



176 Genealogy of I he Coates Family. 

he located at Portsmouth, Ohio. Was Internal R.evinue Collector 
from 1867 to 1881 inclusive, afterward in Insurance, Real Estate 
and Banking business; Receiver for Cincinnati & Eastern R. W.Co. 
Res., 553 Second St., Portsmouth, Ohio. Their children: 

E. i. Joseph Pancoast, b. at West Union, O., 6, iS, 1861. 

2. Lillian Patterson, b. 4, 19, 1867. 

3. Sarah Elizabeth, b. 7, 23, 1S6S. 

Joseph P. Coates was a school teacher in the High School at 
Chillicothe, O. Graduated at Kenton College, O. Representing 
Sciota Co., O,, in Legislature two terms, 1SS7-1S91. Now prac- 
ticing Law in Portsmouth, O. NNM. (1903). 

B 3. C 2-5. D 2. Sarah Coatks (Thomas, Moses, Moses) 
M: — Elijah Penny packer in Autumn of 1831, of near Phoenix- 
ville, Pa. Sarah died while sitting in her chair about 1 A. m., 
12, 2, 1841. Before her marriage to Elijah Peunypacker, Sarah 
followed the occupation of milliner and dressmaker and was an 
expert in these vocations. It was the custom of the Misses of 
the neighborhood, when they wished their forms fitted with a 
new dress or bonnet precisely, they would go to Sarah Coates, at 
"Corner Stores/' who had a reputation of extended renown for 
her ability in such tastes, as well as making it a rule to herself to 
dress in silk as a usual attire for life, and was styled a "thorough- 
bred." 

Her mother being dead, and her father an invalid, having 
an extensive and lucrative business in the above callings; at time 
of her father Thomas' death, she had quite a fair competence, 
which she wished used in direction of reform. When she became 
the wife of Elijah Peunypacker (both of whom were active 
examples of the anti-slavery movement); making their home a 
"station" on the "Underground Railroad." At her death, an 
injunction in her will, was that her husband should use all her 
money he could spare in helping, in the effort of aiding in eman- 
cipating the down-trodden race which was at that time in bond- 
age; all of which he did and excelled her asking in faithful work 
in purse and in every just way, until the shackles fell from the 
arm of the slave in the United States of America. 




Copper Coffee Pot, was Property of Moses Coates, Jr. 




Chair, Owned by Thomas Coates, Son of Moses, Jr., Deceased. 



Gc n ealog y of the Co a tes Fa m ily . 177 

B 3. C 2-7. Prisciixa Coates (Moses, Moses). Was born 
in Chester Co., Pa., in Charlestown Township, 9, 25, 1769. M:— 
in Providence Meeting, Mont. Co., Pa. 5, 2, 1793, to Jonathan, 
son of Josiah and Mary Evans. Jonathan was born in Mont. Co. 
2, 26, 1769. He was a Tanner, and lived near the home of the 
poet, Bayaid Taylor, "Cedarcroft." Pa. In 1797 they moved to 
Center Co., (to Bald Eagle Towship), and in 9 mo., 1812, they 
removed to Chincleclamoose (now Pike) Township, Clearfield 
Co., Pa. When the} r arrived at this place there were but two 
houses near where the Borough of Curwensville now stands. On 
the third day after their arrival they commenced cutting logs for a 
house on the farm now descended to their great-great-grandson, 
Geo. H, Evans, and in nine days moved into it. They both lived to 
an advanced age, and died in Pennville (now Grampian Borough). 
Priscilla, died 11, 29, 1849, and Jonathan 7, 19, 1855, and were 
interred in West Branch F.B.G. They had six children, all of 
whom lived to be married, and are as follows: 

B 3. C 2-7. D 1. Josiah. (Priscilla, Moses, Moses). Born in 
Kennett Township, Chester Co., Pa., 7, 23, 1794. M:— in Clear- 
field Co., Pa., 5, 31, 1821, Elizabeth Stratton, dau. of Isaac and 
Sophia Rodden. Elizabeth was born 3, 25, 1798; died 11, 7, 
1857. Josiah lived with his parents, industriously engaged in 
clearing the farm until 1817, when he went on a visit to Chester 
Co., taveling all the way on foot. At the event of his 90th anni- 
versary he related some account of his early life to those present. 
He said he started in Oct., and in the first two days walked to 
Howard, Centre Co. , where he visited with friends a few days, 
when he pursued his journey to near Williamsport, then to Mil- 
ton where he discarded his worn-out shoes or "pumps" as they 
were called. Then turning up his pantaloons sallied forth bare- 
footed to purchase another pair, then resuming his trip, making 
his stopping places at Northumberland, Sidesingen's on the 
mountain near Mauch Chunk, Reading and finally to his journey's 
end at Charlestown (now Schuylkill Township) at the home of 
his uncle, Thomas Robinson. He remained in Chester County, 



178 Genealogy of the Co cites Family. 

(visiting Phila.) about a year, then started for home on foot, 
about the same route. A letter written to his sister while on 
this visit and dated August 9, 181S, is yet preserved, the postage 
on this letter being 18^ cents. 

He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a 
living example of a consistent Christian. He died 5, 19, 1885, 
and was int. in the family burying ground near his early home. 
Children of Josiah and Elizabeth (Stratton) Evans: 

E. i. Leander Rodden, b. i, n, 1S22; d. 2, 2, 1S22. 

2. Elmira Hannah, b. 8, 2, 1823. M: — Lewis C. Galer, 4, 28, 1840. 

Lewis died, 11, 14, 1842. They had two children, died in in- 
fancy. Elmira married second time, Isaac Segner, 10, 10, 

1850. Their children : F. 2-1. Lorena, b. 8, 2, iS5i; d. 8, i2 } 

1851, 2-2. Edwin E., b. 2, 6, 1S53; d. 4, 4, 1885. M:— 10, 29, 
1S75, Hattie Slater. Their chiid: G. 1. Charles W., b. 8, 8, 
1878; d. 8, 8, 1878. 2-3. Laura J. ? b. 5, 9, 1855; d. 5, 9, 1857. 2-4. 
Sophia E., b. 5, 28, 1858; d. 7, 12, i860. 2-5. Oscar M., b. T2, 3, 
i860; d. 8, 8, 1863. All born in Curwensville except the first, 
Elmira died 10, 12, 1866, and Isaac died 1, 1, 1891. 

3. Horatio M., b, 2, 22, 1825; d. 2, 22, 1S25. 

4. Moses Lewis Coates, b. 5, 8, 1826. M:— 8, 17, 1845, Elizabeth 

McDowell, b. 10, 15, 1826; d. 3, 26, 1884. Had three children. 
M. L. C. M: — (second wife), Mrs. Annie Harley, who survives 
him. He died 6, 7, 1893. They were members of the M. E. 
Church, and at time of his death owned farm of his grand- 
father, Jonathan Evans, near Curwensville, Pa. Their chil- 
dren: F. 1. Frances Emma, b. 6, 9, 1856; d, 8, 2, 1879. A 
faithful member of the M. E. Church, and teacher in Sabbath 
School, and consistent Christian in all her ways. Interred in 
Friends Cemetery, near the Evans home. 2. George Hartline, 
b. 10, 29, i860. M: — 10, 16, 1901, Blanche, dau. of Benjamin and 
Mary Speakman. One child: G. 1. Will Lewis, b. 6, 5, 1903. 
Owns the old Evans home. P.O., Curwensville, Pa. 3. Lewis 
Johnson, b. ir, 17, 1868. M: — 1 1, 1900, Hattie E. Slater, widow 
of Edwin E. Segner. Lewis is a machinist, owns property in 
Curwensville, but is employed by Volgan Iron Works, Toledo* 
Ohio. Address 1014 Superior St. 

5. Sophia J., b. 8, 6, 1S2S. M:— 8, 20, 1849, George B. Goodlander, 
Editor of "The Clearfield Republican" many years, he died 1, 

1897. No children. Sophia was the last survioor of her parents 
and eight children. An active worker in M. E. Church with 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 179 

which she united in her youth. Died 8, 20, 1904, int., Clearfield, 

6. Priscilla M., b. 9, 23, 1S30; d. 11, 25, 1899, UNM. Caretaker of 

Pa. 

her father more than forty years. Consistent member of M.E. 

Church. 

7. Joseph Milton, b. 5, n, 1833; d. 6, 30, 1S33. 

8. George Rodden, b. 9, 5, 1S37; d. 9, 5, 1S37. 

B 3. C 2-7. D 2. Moses Coates Evans (Priscilla, Moses, 
Moses) b. in Kennett Twpt., Chester Co., Pa., 1, 1, 1796. Mi- 
ni Clearfield Co., Pa., 3, 15, 1830, Rebecca Smeal, she b. 10, 30, 
1802; d. 3, 8, 18S0. Moses owned a farm in Graham Twpt., 
where he spent the greater part of his life. Died 1, 31, 1S84. 
Children: 

E. 1. Elizabeth, b. 12, 10, 1831. M:— 6, 10, 1S49, Jonathan Emig. 
Children: All born near Morrisdale Mines, Clearfield Co., Pa- 
F. 1. Hiram, b. 11, 23, 1850; d. 8, 2, 1873, a farmer, UNM. 2. 
Priscilla, b. 8, 4, 1S52. M:— in 1S79, Jas. Hummel, a farmer. 
Priscilla, d. 4, 28, 18S4. 3. Lucretia, b. 2, 23, 1854. M: — 3, iS, 
1874, Wm. Quick, a miner. Lucretia, d. 7, 5, 1SS4. 4. Geo. 
W., b. 3, 10, 1S56. M:— Ella Howe, of Phillipsburg, Pa., a 
physician. One child: G. 1. George Walton. F. 5. Jona- 
than, Jr., b. 5, 3, 1S5S. M:— 9, 14, 1S90, Hallie Williams, of 
Morrisdale, Pa. J. Jr., is a miner. Children: H. 1. Ella. 2. 
Forest. 3. Myrtle. 4. Wilson. 5. Elizabeth. 6. Ruth. F. 
6. Rebecca J., b. 5, 9, i860. M:— John G. Campbell, is a black- 
smith. Children: G. Anna, Mary, Francis J., Jesse A., Eliza- 
beth, Rebecca J., d. 3 mo. 15, James, Henry, b. 3, 7, 1862, is a 
miner, UNM., Andrew J., b. 5, 29, 1864^.9, 14, 1873, Anna 
E., b, 3, 11, 1866. M: — Geo. W. Pierce, he is a carpenter. 
Children: G. Emma, Francis, May, Henrietta, Elizabeth, 
Effa. Anna C, d. 2, 22, 1899, Francis M,, a farmer, b. 2, 23, 
1868. M:— Sarah Gray. Children: G. 1. Ethel. 2. Ira. 3. 
Edgar. 4. Allen. 5. Nora. F. 12. Florence C, b. 4, 10, '71. 
M:— Thos. Round, of Morrisdale, Pa. Child: H. 1. Raymond E . 
2. Henry H., b. 3, 20, 1835. M:— 3, 20, 1866, Catharine Wilhelm. 
Children: All born near Grahampton, Pa. F. 1. Clarence, 
b. io, iS, 1868; d. in infancy. 2. Frank W., b. 12, Si, 1871. M: 
9, 8, 1901, Louisa A. Mines. Children: G. 1. Ethel May. 2. 
Hazel. Frank W., is a farmer. P. O. Grahampton, Pa. 
Children: H. 1. Judson W., b. 4, 29, 1S74. M: — n, 1903, Sarah 
M. Greene. One child: Josephine J., Res. Grahampton, Pa- 



180 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

2. Willard H t , b. 9, 3, 1876. 3. Cordelia C, b. 10, 4, 1878. 4. 
Augusta H., b. 7, 30, 1880. 5. Emma Blanche, b. 3, 18, 1S83. 

6. Eniilie Winnifred, b. 2, 7, 1887. The last four are teachers. 

3. Jonathan C, b, 11, 9, 1S36. M:— 2, 27, 1862, Mary J. Heise- 

Children: All born in Clearfield Co., Pa. F. 1. Harry, 2. 
Emma. 3. Lillie. 4. Mary. 5. Blair. 6. Ernest. 7. Lynn- 

8. Stella. 9. Viola. P. O., Keylerstown, Pa. Of these chil- 
dren, two have died and seven are married (1905)- 

4. Catharine, b. 9, 9, 1S39. M:— 4, 21, 1S59, James Moyer. One 

child. G. 1. Rebecca, b. 6. 30, 1S59. M:— 5, 30, 1876, John 
Emigh, b. i, 5, 1853. Children: All born in Clearfield Co., Pa. 
G. 1. Alfred, b, 8, 18, 1876. M:— 10, 7, 1896, E. Agnes Smeal, 
b. 3, 7, 1S79. Children: I. 1. Maggie, b. 10, 16, 1897. 2. Eva, b 

7, 20, 1899. Maude, b. 3, 10, 1903. G. 2. Bertha, b. 3, 13, 1879. 

3. Cordie E., b. 12, 3, 1S81. M: — 1, 7, 1899, Jonah Quick, b. 11, 
2S, 1SS0. Children: I. 1. Russell, b. 4,4,1899. 2. Charles, b. 
4,11,1901. 3. Arlene, b, 2, 24, 1904. G. 4. Edward, b. 1,6, 1884. 
5. Ellis, b. 4, 10, 1SS6. 6. John, b. 8, 26, 1889. 7. Mitchell, b. 
12, 27, 1S92; d. 4, 26, 1893. 8. Anna, b. 7, 1, 1894. 9. Lloyd, b. 

4. 8, 1897. 10. Emily, b. 7, 8, 1900. 

5. Ellis W.,b. 2, 14, 1842. M:— 2, 2, 1875, Sarah A. Heise. Children, 

All born in Clearfield Co., Pa., except one, in Macon Co., 111., 
and two in Center Co., Pa. F. 1. Rebecca M., b. 2, 19, 1876; 
d. 1,5, 1S81, 2. Moses Lewis, b. 9, 5, iS7S;d. 7, 7, 1SS1. 3. Josiah 
Milton, b. 7, 6, 1880. A student in the Ministry. 4. Henry H., b. 

9, 6, 1S82. M:— 9, 7, 1904, Olive Hubber. P.O., Grahampton, Pa. 

5. George W., b. 5, 3, 18S4. 6. William W., b. 7, 2, 1S87. 7- 
Bonnie Ella Bond, b. 5, 13, 1889. 8. Graver C, b. 2, 21, 1S91 
9. Ellis W., b. 3, 25, 1893. 10. Frederick K., b. 9, 25, 1S95. 11: 
Austin P., b. 2, 25, 1897. 12. Elizabeth C, b. 2, 27, 1904. 

6. Josiah M., b. 5, 14, 1844. M:— 9, 12, 1867, Martha E. Parker 

Children: All born in Clearfield Co., Pa., except one, in Phil- 
ljppsburg, Pa. G. 1. William E., b. 12, 28, 1S67. M: — 9, 23 
1S90, Lucretia Miles. P.O., Clearfield, Pa. Children: H. 1! 
Harry R., b. 7, 28, 1S91. 2. George G., b. 5, 29, 1S93. 3. Esther 
E., b. 10, 11, 1S96. 4. Solomon M., b. 12, 17, 1898. 5. Earl P., 
b. 8, 18, 1903. G. 2. George G., b. 2, S, 1S69. M:— 2, 26, 1S95, 
Annie E. Mumper. P.O., Clearfield, Pa. Chidren: H. 1. 
Charles M., b. 2, 15, 1S96. 2. Leonard, b. 5, 30, 1897. 3. 
Davis PL, b. 1, 8, 1899. 4. Millard J., b. 12, 2, 1900. 5. Helen 
E., b. 2, 12, 1902. 6. Ruth J. A., b. 10, 1 , 1903. G. 3. Miriam 
E., 4, 5, 1872. 4. Mary, b. 9, 5, 1S73. 5. David S., b. 2, 14, 
1S75. 6. Agnes M. 7. Flora, b. 7, 25, 18S0. 8, John W., b. 



Genealogy of the Co ales Family 181 

8, 17, 1S92. The last six were burned in house in which they 
were sleeping owing to fire in night and all escape was cut off, 
fire getting headway before discovered. 7, 16, 1SS5. 9. Josiah 
M., b. 5, 25, 1884. 10. Dora A., b. 8, 10, 18S6. n. Nellie E., 
b. II, 3, iSSS. 
7. Rebecca J., b. 3, 8, 1S49; d. 21, 1S55. 

B 3. C 2-7. D 3. Sarah Evans (Priscilla, Moses, Moses). 
Bom in Chester Co., Pa., 11, 17, 1797. M:— in West Branch 
Friends Meeting, Clearfield Co., Pa., 12, 13, 1827, Jeremiah, 
son of James and Lydia (Sharpless) Moore, b. 8, 14, 1794, in 
Chester Co., Pa. Sarah served as Clerk of her Monthly and 
Quarterly Meetings for several years. A small quill pen remains 
in a book in which she wrote some poetic stanzas in 1821, she 
died 8, 1, 1S44. Jeremiah died 7, 26, 1873. Both int. in F.B.G. 
at West Branch, Pa. Children: 

E. 1. Priscilla, b. 8, 31, 1S29; d, 22, 1S36; int. F.B.G. at West Branch, 
Pa. 
2. Abraham C, b. 3, 9, 1S31. M: — 6, 17, 1S58, in Grampian, Pa., 
Hannah J., dau. of James and Jane (Shivery) Moore. Their 
children: F. 1. Lewis Carlton, b. 5, 10, 1859. M: — 12, 30, 
1903, in Luthersburg, Pa., Florence, dau. of J. N. and Mira D. 
Booze. In the Spring of 1S98, he went with a company to 
the Klondike gold-fields, built himself a house and lived near 
Dawson City for about two and a half years, now (1905) is in 
Blandburg, Clarion Co., Pa. Florence is a music teacher of 
ability, a son was born to them, 4, 1 5, 1905. 2. Francis B.,b. 4, 1 7, 
1861. M: — Benjamin Barkey, an en engineer. Children: 1 
Clare, b. 10, 22, 1S86. 2. Alice, b. 1, 10, 1888. 3. John D., b. 
11, 8, 1890. 4. Tulles, b. 2, 24, 1893. 5. Edna, b. 5, 30, 1895. 
6. Wm. Edward, b. 7, 25, 1S9S. 3. Alice J. b. 5, 12, 1S63, M: — 10, 
30, 1S84, Harvy B., son of Abraham and Sarah (Fenton) 
Spencer, b. 3, 27, 1S60. No children. Harvy owns a farm in 
Linn Co., Oregan, but is engaged to operate a planing mill in 
Lebanon, Oregon. 4. Sarah Adella, b. 9, 12, 1S66. M: — 10, 
30, 18S4, Charles C. Hoover, res., Grampian, Pa. Children: 
1. Alice C, b. 12, 25, 1885; d. 1, 9, 1SS6. 2. Grace H., b. 8, 10, 
1888; d. 10, 6, 1SS8. 3. Carl L., b. S, 23, 1892; d. 11, 22, 1892. 4. 
Lenore M., b. 10, 21, 1893. 5. Vera G., b. 7, 4, 1895; d. 3, 13, 
1896. 6. Pauline M., b. 2, 10, 1S97: d. 3, 3 ,1897. 7. Carla Moore, b. 
4,16, 1S98. 5. Clara E., b. 1, 23, 1872. M:— 6, 30, 1S97, John, son of 
Isaac and Annie (Caldwell) Norris. P.O., Grampian, Pa. 



182 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

One child, Isaac Bruce, b. 4, 28, 1903. 6. Edson J., b. 4, 29, 
1874. M:— 1 1, 12, TS96, Ora L. Peters, b. 3, 20, 1S78; d. in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., 12, 31, 1902. Int. in F.B.G., near Grampian, Pa. 
Children: 1. Margante Ross, b. 7, 7, 1897. 2. Van Carl, b. 7, 
15, 1899. Edson J., married 2nd time, 2, 15, 1905, Alvina M. 
Pinder. P.O., Grampan, Pa. 
3. Elizabeth, b. 10, 24, 1S32. M:— 6, 16, 1S53, George W., son of 
Jacob and Margaret (Brown) Walters. George W., b. 8, 3, 
1S30, at Bower, Pa., removed to Wright Co., Iowa where he 
died 9, 5, 1S62. Elizabeth returned to Grampian, Pa., and mar- 
ried 8, 9, 1865 Gideon R.,son of Jacob and Gulielma(Widemire) 
Doughman. Gideon R., served in the army \% years, has 
been Post Master at Grampian most of the time since 1S70. 
Elizabeth died 12, 28, 1900, int., at West Branch F.B.G. She 
had four children by each marriage. Children of George W t 
and Elizabeth E. (Moore) Walters: 1. Clara Irene, b. 6, 16, 
1S54. M:— 10, 21, 1S79, Alfred T. Owens, son of Moses and 
Susanna (Spencer), b. 2,9.1853. Is a harnessmaker. P.O., 
Curwensville, Pa. Children: 1. Alice, b. 7, 31, 1SS0. M:— 5, 
22, 1903, John, son of John and Agnes Brownlee, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Child: Agnes Irene, b. 3,16, 1904. 2. Edna Elizabeth, b. 4, 26, 
1887. 2. William Alton, b. 2, 23, 1856. M:— in Princeton, Mo. 
9, 12, 1886, Eva E. Blaker, b. 9, 26, 1S67. Win, is a carpenter. 
Res., 5164 Gloster St., Pittsburg, Pa. Children: George Clif- 
ton, b. 3, 26, 1SS8. Irene Alice, b. 12, 9, 1S90. Raymond Alton, 
b. 2, 21, 1S96. Lorna May, b. 2, 27, 1899; d: 6, 2S, 1S99. 3. Alice 
Jane, b. 3, 28, 1856 M:— 7, 1899, in Princeton, Mo., John J. Up- 
ton, of Wright Co., Iowa. J. J., is a banker and dealer in real 
estate in Oreana, Okla. No children. 4. George W., b. 3, 24, 
i860; d. 9, 5, 1862, in Grampian, Pa. Int. at West Branch. 
Children of Gideon P. and Elizabeth E. (Moore-Walters) 
Doughman. All born in Grampian, Pa.: Walter G., b. 5, 11, 
1S65. M:— 12, 18, 18S9, Delilah Agnes Dickey. He is a Con- 
tractor and builder in Grampian, Pa. Children: Judy, b. n, 19, 
1S91; d. 1, 23, 1S92. Gideon P., b. 1, 22, 1893. Dudley H„ b. 4, 
27, 1S95. Esther E., b. 12, 3, 189S. Bess Loraine, b. 4, 9, 1902; 
d. S, 4, 1902. Dalny Elma, b. 9, 7, 1903. 5. Zella T., b. 6, 12, 
1867. M:— Roland G., son ot James and Nora (Neal) Farwell. 
R. G., keeps a livery in Grampian, Pa. Children all born in 
Grampian, Pa. Thornton D., b. 6, 30, 1890. Richard O., b 
12, 5, 1892. James G., b. 2, 11, 1S95. Nora Elizabeth, b. 9, 8j 
1897; d. 10, 22, 1899. Norma Esther, b. n, 3, 1S99. John Fran.! 
cis, b. 9, 10, 1902. 6. Virginia T., b. 10, 30, 1S69. M:— 



Genealogy of the Co cites Family. 183 

Freeman. Children, all born in Grampian, Pa., Chester, b. 12, 
8, 1SS8. Mabel, b. it, 16, 1892. Laura June, b. 4, 22, 1S95; d. 4, 
1, 1900. Elizabeth and Arabel (twins), b. 4, 14, 1902. Fay, b. 
5, 25, 1904. 7. Sarah Elma, b. 2, 7, 1S72. M:— 3, 8, 1S91, Bur- 
gess Willett; he is a stationary engineer. Children, all born in 
Grampian, Pa. Blaine G., b, 6, 19, 1S91. George V., b. 12, 8 
1S92. Dalphene E., b. 6,8,1895. Carroll, b. io, 189S. Lyallj 
b., 1901. P.O., Pe. ell Wash. 5 30, 

4. Lydia, b. 4, 16, 1834; d. 3, 1S42, Int. at West Branch F.B.G. 

5. Susanna S., b. 6, 1, 1836. M:— 10, 30, 1856, by Friends cere- 

mony, Thomas A., son of Joseph and Rebecca (Price) Hoover. 
T. A. b. 4, 29, 1830, in Clearfield County, Pa. Was a farmer 
and lumberman; d. in Curwensville, 10, iS, 18S2. They were 
members of M. E. Church. Married second time, u, 1, 1S88, 
Moses, son of Peter and Jane Owens. Moses d. 4, 30, 1903. 
No children, Susanna's P.O. is Curwensville, Pa. 

6. Esther, b. 1, 14, 1S38. M:— 10, 26, 1876, in West Branch F. M., 

William S., son of Charles J. and Esther (Cooper) Fox. Wm. 
S., b. 9, 22, 1839, in Harrison Co., Ohio, and is a farmer, sur- 
veyor, civil engineer and Notary Public. P.O., Cadiz, Ohio, 
R.F.D. No. 7. Their children: F. 1. Mary Moore, b. 7, 29, 
1877. 2. John Francis, b. 12, 4, 1S7S, d. 6, 9, 1897, at George 
School, Bucks Co., Pa. 3. Erie Esther, b. 4, 13, 1SS0, at Short 
Creek, Ohio. 

7. Jeremiah, b. 9, 7, 1S40; d. 3, 24, 1S46. Int. at West Branch 

F.B.G., Grampian, Pa. 

B 3. C 2-7. D 4. Jonathan Evans (Priscilla, Moses, Moses) 
b. 11, 8, 1800. M:— 5, 17, 1827, Hannah B., dan. of Isaac and 
Sophia Rodden. J., was Post Master at Grampian, Pa., for 
many years; d. 2, 12; 1859. H., d. 6, 2, 1S76 in Curwensville, 
Pa. Both int. at West Branch F.B.G. No children. 

B 3. C 2-7. D 5. Elizabeth Evans (Priscilla, Moses, Moses) 
b. 2, 22, 1803. M:— 10, 16, 1823, William Carson. E., d. 8, 3, 
1824. No children. 

B 3. C 2-7. D 6. Priscilla Robinson Evans (Priscilla, 
Moses, Moses) b. 10, 28, 1808. M:— 12, 1, 1839, William F., son 
of Saml. Johnson, b. 11, 8, 1815. Wm. owned a farm in Penn 
Twp., and a mill in Union Twp. Also was engaged a few 
years in mercantile business. P., d, 12, 10, 1875. Wm., d. 4, 
22, 1886. They had one daughter: 



184 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

E. i. Sarah Ann, b. 12, 12, 1740, in Penn Twpt., Clearfield Co., Pa. 

M:— 12, 1, 1859, in Rockton, Pa., to William Welty, b. 2, 28, 

1836. Wm. is a farmer. They have four children. P. O., 

Grampian, Pa. Their children: 1. Lewis Emlin, b. 9, 24, i860. 

UNM., is an undertaker at Grampian, Pa. 2. Laura Jane, b. 

9, 9, 1866; d. 3, 3, 1872. 3. Elvina Elizabeth, b. 8, 27, 1868; d. 1, 

12, 1879. 4. Emma Irene, b. 9, 2, 187 1, M: — 6, 29, 1902, 

Enoch Evans Thomas, b. 6, 30, 187 1, in Scranton, Pa. No 

children. 

B 3. C 1. C 1. E 2. Wiluam Swaffkr Davis (Rachel, 

Sarah, Moses, Moses) M:— Catharine dau. of Joseph and Susan 

(Hill) Engle, 9, 10, 1829, both of Chester, Del. Co., Pa. Their 

children: 

F. 1. Joseph E., b. 11, 30, 1831; d. 1, 31, 1890, in Chester, Pa. 

2. Carolina, b. 9, 24, 1833; d. 4, 1, 1852. 

3. Mary H., d. 1, 1904, at Spruce Grove, Pa. 

4. Susan, b. 7, 26, 1837; d. 3, 20, 1852. 

5. Dorithea, b. 10, it, 1838. 

6. William, b. 12, 20, 1840; d. 2, 17, 1885, at Leavenworth, Kansas. 

7. Ellen, b. 4, 21, 1843; d. 7, 31, 18S3, in Christiana, Pa. 

8. Hill Engle, b. 2, 19, 1844. 

9. Louisa, b. 4, 2, 1846. 

10. Catherine E., b. 11, 1847. 

11. Harry. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 1. Joseph E. Davis (William, Rachel, 
Sarah, Moses, Moses) M:— Lucretia M. Hays, 1, 13, 1859. 

Child: 

G. 1. Catherine Engle, b. 5, 27, 1861; d. 9, 14, 1903, in Chester, Pa. 
int. in Oxford Cemeter, Pa. M:— Rufus H., son of James and Martha 
Springer. He d. 8, 1896, int. Oxford Cemetery. Lucretia died when Joseph 
married Anna E. Wright, of Chester, Pa., 12, 25^ 1883. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 3. Mary Hornk Davis (William, 
Rachel, Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — James Turner, son of Alex, 
and Mary, 2, 14, 1856. Children: 

G. 1. William A., b. 6, 20, 186S. M:— Renie Smith. No children. 
Has sheep and cattle ranch at Bretton S. Dakota. 2, Caroline 
D., M:— Chas. Whiteside, b. 11, 20, 1883. Children: H. 1. Mary 
C, b. 8,27,11887; d. 4, 23, 1904, in New York City. 2. Walter A., 
b. 11, 28, 1S90. 3. Dora B., b. 1, 5, 1892. G. 3. Montgomery 
Bell, b. 9, i860. M:— Jennie Bailey, of S. Dakota. Children: 



Genealogy of the Coatcs Family. 185 

H. i. Mary. 2. Brinton W. 3. Aris. 4. Mara B. 5. Jennie. 
6. Montgomery B. Res., Tulaboma, Tenn. G. 4. Joseph E., 
b. 12,30, 1861. UNM. Res., Sioux City, Iowa. 5. James Ful- 
ton, b. 7, 5, 1863. M: — Anna Rheinhart. Child: H. 1. James, 
b. 5, 1894. Res., Sioux City, Iowa. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 1. F 6. William Davis (William, Rachel, 
Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Shemineth Andrews Underwood, 10, 
29, 1862. She died 6 mo. 1865. William afterward married 
Isabella, daughter of Samuel and Catherine Holmes, of Upper 
Oxford Towhship, Chester Co., Pa., 10 mo. 1S66. William had 
b} T last wife a daughter: 

G. 1. Caroline Davis, b. 12, 25, 1S70. M: — 6,4, 1S9S, William Harmon. 
2. Edwin, b. 9, 1S73. 3. William S., d. young. 1 and 2 live in 
Leavemvorth, Kansas. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 7. Ellen Davis (William, Rachel, 

Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Brinton, son of George and Hannah 

(Brown) Walter, of Christiana, Pa., 11, 8, 1876. Their child: 

G. 1. Georgiane, M.D., b. 1, 19. Was graduated from the Woman's 

Medical College, Phila., in Class of 1902. Had a term in Post 

Graduate work in Phila. Hospital. Res., Pine St., Phila., Pa. 

(1905,) 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 8. Hill Englk Davis (William, 

Rachel, Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Anna E., daughter of David 

and Hannah Bunting, 12, 7, 1869. Their children: 

G. 1. Louisa, b. 12, 17, 1870. M: — Calvin Swisher, 10, 5, 1S92, who 
died (C. S.) in 1893. 

2. William S., b. 7, 1S74. M: — Lena Boyd, 2, 1Q03. 

3. Clyde, b. 12, 1S75; d. 3, 1SS2. 

4. Joseph W., b. 8, 18S4. 

5. Fred, b. 2, 9, 1886. 

Anna (Bunting) Davis died 12, 1900. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 9. Louisa Davis (William, Rachel, 
Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Brinton Walter, of Christiana, Pa., 
as his third wife. 

B3.C1. D1.E2. F 10. Catherine E. Davis (William, 
Rachel, Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Joseph Potts, son of John 
and Maria Echternach, 10, 29, 1872. Their children: 

G. 1. Elloise, b. 7, 1874; d. 11, 1875. 



186 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

2. Caroline Davis, b. 3, 1, 1876. M: — John, son of Nicholas and 

Amanda Danner, 3, 1896. 

3. Joseph P., b. 4, 23, 1879. J. P. E., was graduated in the Dental 

Dept. of Penn. University in 6, 1903. Joseph P. Echternach, 
Sr., died 10 mo., 1S95. 

B 3. C 1. D 1. E 2. F 11. Harry Davis (William, Rachel, 
Sarah, Moses, Moses) M: — Roberta, dau. of Hugh and Eliza 
Ross, of Upper Oxford Township, Chester Co., Pa., 2, 9, 1886. 
Children: 

G. 1, Helen R., b. 3, 1S90. 

2. Norman E., b. 6, 1S91. Roberta died 11, 1S94, when Harry M: — 
Phebe Evanson, dau. of Reece and Hannah. 



Some verses composed by Moses Robinson, a great-grandson 
of Moses Coates, may be of interest to the lover of i( ye olden 
time." 

MOSES COATES. 

In the village of Phoenix and near a small rill, 

That ripples o'er rocks as it descends from the hill, 

By some wild honey locusts and near to the road, 

The Pioneer of the Wilderness took up his abode, 

Where a dark, tangled forest spread over his ground 

And the howling of wolves made the valleys resound. 

When the country around was all covered with wood, 

A boundless wilderness and deep solitude. 

His cattle did then to the wilderness stray, 

And when evening drew near, he'd be wending his way 

Through thick-set woodland and deep forest dell, 

Directing his course by the sound of their bell: 

And to prevent them from falling to the wild beast of prey 

He would lodge them in folds e'er the close of the day. 

In morning, to the forest he would go with his axe, 

And in health he did never from his labour relax, 

Till his energy and strength made the wilderness yield, 

And a rich, yellow harvest waved over his field. 

His labour each year did new beauties disclose, 

And the wilderness blossomed like unto the rose. 

The beauties of Ceres his labours beguiled, 

And where late was a desert, a paradise smiled, 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 187 

His seven stout sons, so blithesome and gay, 

With cheerfulness worked on his farm through the day, 

And when evening approached and the herd boy appeared, 

The lowing of cattle and cow boy was heard. 

His farmers returning most joyfully along, 

The plough-boys were greeted with the dairy-maids' song. 

The songs of his spinners made his mansion resound, 

And their spinning wheels then went merrily round. 

Whilst his weaver hard by in a separate room. 

Was timing his ditty to his shuttle and loom. 

With the product of his soil were his graineries stored, 

And crowned was, with plenty his hospitable board. 

Kind Providence granting what he could reasonably desire, 

And he rose to a competency to which few could aspire. 

But now, alas, how changed is the scene. 

There was scarcely a vestage of what it had been, 

Far down in his meadow where the cattle once strayed, 

The sons of old Vulcan* their fireworks displayed. 

Dark columns of smoke in the heavens have appeared, 

And loud peals of thunder are frequently heard. 

And near its north border, close by the old swamp, 

Where Jack o'Lantern did oft light his lamp, 

There stands a huge column, belching forth smoke and flame, 

As if Etna and Vesuvius were playing a game. 

His beautiful garden has gone to decay, 

And his mill and his mansion have both passed away; 

And the boats may be seen, now, passing along, 

Where his haymakers were enraptured with the dairy-maid's song. 

But nearly a century did since intervene, 

And Oblivion's dark mantle has shrouded the scene. 



FROM JOURNAL OF SARAH (COATES) PENNYPACKER 

Second day, Seventh Mo., 18th. Elijah and I left home in 
company with Mary A. Pennypacker and arrived at Paoli about 
ten o'clock. Paoli is a public place of Revolutionary memory 
about twenty miles west of Philadelphia, and the third stopping 
to wood and water the Engine. On a passage westward after 
leaving the Schuylkill incline plane the first water station is 
Whitehall. The next station alternates at Morgan's Corner, 
and Spread Eagle. We were detained at Paoli until about eleven, 
*Allusion is here made to the Phoenix Iron Works. 



188 Genealogy of the Co ales Family. 

and were employed the interval in viewing the garden and shrub- 
bery connected with the establishment. At this time the engine 
bell rang, and the train came in sight. It consisted of eleven 
cars and three of them were double or eight wheeled cars. 

We took our seats in one of the double cars and moved on 
slowly and majestically a short distance. But our speed soon in- 
creased to the rate of twenty miles an hour. Notwithstanding 
we glided along so rapidly we had a handsome view of the farms 
of Chester County Valley. The excellence of which, being so 
well known that they need no description. The first place we 
halted was Oakland. The car agent stated that there were be- 
tween two and three hundred passengers. We descended the 
north side of the valley hill at a rapid rate. Observed some shops 
at Oakland, for the purpose of repairing cars. In this vicinity 
there is a branch railroad leading to the marble quarries of John 
R. Thomas from which the City Council obtained supply of 
marble blocks of great size and beauty, for the Girard College. 

After leaving Oakland we were soon brought to the viaduct 
across the Valley Creek, a handsome structure consisting of five 
arches. After passing a short distance, the back view of it is 
beautiful. Turning from the view of the bridge we now and 
then caught a glimpse of the haymakers and reapers and had in 
view the village of Downingtown and the viaduct across the east 
branch of the Brandywine. 

This viaduct is of moderate elevation. And its structute is 
similar to the one just mentioned. Downingtown, my own County 
Village, I feel associated the reflection of having spent some 
pleasing moments there once on a visit. It contains some hand- 
some houses. At this place we obtained additional supplies of 
water and fuel, it is 33 miles from Philadelphia. After leaving 
Downingtown we passed Gallaherville, one mile from Downiug- 
town. And six miles further along the middle of the valley the 
attention is arrested by the Village of Coatesville, it is situated 
on the west branch of the Brandywine. 

Surrounded by a very fertile country. The view from the 
very high viaduct across the Brandywine is commanding. The 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 189 

viaduct being eighty feet high and stretches across a chasm about 
six hundred feet wide. The cars are whirled across by the loco- 
motive and a person appears like beiug in mid-air. The Valley 
of the Brandwine above the viaduct which is made narrow by 
the adjacent hills arising from near the margin of the water looks 
romantic. I am told this vicinity abouuds with manufactories 
of various kinds. 

The next place of importance is Parkesburg, a water station 
and the place where a very large workshop is located for repair- 
ing disabled eugines, four miles from Coatesville. From Parkes- 
burg we passed along the side of the hill that constitutes the 
northern boundary of the valley. It is less fertile and more 
dignified with rocks than the valley. We continued to glide 
along the northern boundary of the valley until we reached the 
Gap, which is fifty-three miles from Philadelphia and eight from 
Parkesburg. What astonished me very much is that although 
the Gap is the highest part of the Railroad it is a perfect swamp 
or quicksand. Having passed through the Gap excavation, 
Pequa valley, one of the rich valleys of Lancaster County comes 
in view. Although the valley is in good state of culture the 
wheat fields which appeared ready for the harvest men, appeared 
quite poor. The corn fields were excellent. We passed three 
viaducts. The first crossed Pequa Creek, the second Mill Creek, 
and the third Big Conastoga Creek. The two first bridges were 
across mill streams of ordinary size and the bridges are of usual 
length. The third one is a bridge constructed, I am told, upon 
the lattice plan. And although the stream is not more than two 
hundred yards wide, the bridge appears almost half a mile long* 
Shortly after passing this bridge the city of Lancaster came in 
view. The largest inland town in the state. The railroad 
passes through the northern part of the town: The buildings in 
the outer parts of town are of German order (one story high). 
The buildings in the interior are high, and present the entire ap- 
pearance of a City. 

It is 27 miles from Parkesburg and 71 from Philadelphia. 



190 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

After tarrying at Lancaster long enough to dine and resuscitate the 
engine we proceeded to Columbia a distance of 12 miles in about 
45 minutes. The country west of Lancaster is finely diversified 
with fertile fields and some good buildings. Passed the little 
Conastoga Creek by a viaduct of considerable length, after we 
had proceeded about two miles from Lancaster the Engine took 
us to the head of the plane. 

From the foot of the plane we were drawn by horses to the 
Canal basin along the Railroad located near the bank of the 
River Susquehanna. The view of the river was very much ob- 
structed as we passed along by the piles of lumber on the bank. 
The Canal basin is quite capacious. We waited to see the boats 
depart with the passengers upon the arrival of the cars and went 
to Gossler's Hotel. 

After taking some refreshments we went out to see the 
bridge across the river. It connects Columbia with Wrightsville, 
a village situated on the opposite shore of the river. The struc- 
ture of the bridge is the most noble I ever saw. It is one mile and a 
quarter long, and rests on twenty-eight piers. It is designed 
for common travel and for a railroad. Columbia is a lively place. 
It contains many good buildings and stores. Situated on the 
bank of the Susquehanna River, eighty-three miles by Railroad 
from Philadelphia. 

Third-day morning, the 19th. We left Columbia in the 
Northumberland packet boat for Harrisburg. About a mile from 
Columbia we came to a wonderful precipice called Chickeys Rocks. 
This pile of rock rises we suppose to the heighth of four hundred 
feet. It is almost perpendicular. And in some places the large 
fragments or blocks of rock appears to project, or hang over. I was 
told one of these fragments once gave way and tumbled down with 
such force that it carried away a part of a building; after passing 
we took a back view and near the top the rock presents a good 
profile of a human face. 

At this place there is a considerable bend in the river. Just 
as we approached the point of it a person observed there are 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 191 

three towns in view: Columbia, Wrightsville and Marrietta, which 
is three miles above Columbia on the same side of the river. At 
the foot of the precipice just above the bend there is a splendid 
house designed for a gentleman's summer retreat. We glided 
along at the rate of four miles and hour, amusing ourselves with 
the scenery of the surrounding country and the wide Susque- 
hanna. We soon reached Marrietta, a handsome village situated on 
the bank of the Susquehanua. The village is two miles in length. 

The next village is Bainbridge, the distance of six miles from 
Marrietta. The village was originally laid out along the old 
road leading from Middletown to Columbia. There is a very 
abrupt rise of the ground that obstructs the view of a person 
passing along in a packet boat. In consequence but a small part 
of the village can be seen, and proceeding a few miles further the 
attention is arrested by the water foaming and dashing among 
the rocks at Conewago falls. The rapids or falls continue a con- 
siderable distance. 

The Susquehanna is a very rocky stream. The next we 
pass a long island. Above this there are four Islands in a range 
across the River. A large stream separating each. The river is 
said to be more than two miles wide at this place. Just above a 
large sheet of water is presented to view in which is an Island very 
much elevated. The next point of importance is Middletown. 
And its near neighbor, Portsmouth. The Canal is located along 
the margin of the River all the wa}' from Columbia to this place. 
There is most of the way nothing but a towing path and Canal 
Bank that separates the water in the canal from that in the 
River. On the opposite of the Canal there is a common road. 
And on the other side of the road, part of the way a Railroad. 
The Country near the River is not very fertile. It is said to be 
better on the more elevated ground a little distance from it. 

Middletown and Portsmouth are situated at the Junction of 
the Swatara River with the Susquehanna nine miles from Bain- 
bridge. and eighteen from Columbia. The Swatara is crossed by 
an aqueduct. Middletown is an ancient town. And is increas- 



192 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

ing in importance. It was orginally laid out a little distant from 
the junction. The canal gave rise to some buildings in its im- 
mediate vicinity from whence Portsmouth is derived. The 
buildings or arrangements in either show but little taste in 
neatness. The next is Highspire, a small village on the turn- 
pike road, which the canal crosses at this place. The scenery 
represents much of a sameness from there to Harrisburg, the 
right hand side tolerably level, and the left hand side of the river 
a range of undulating hills, and some villages. 

Approaching Harrisburg, Paxtons Creek is crossed by a 
aqueduct. From which the frontier Settlement of the same name 
was derived. In the early history of Pennsylvania, I believe about 
the year 1756 is replete with incidents that occurred between the 
Indians and the frontier settlements. One of these settlements 
was Paxtons and was at this Creek. What amazement ! This 
spot Eighty years ago the frontier Western settlement contend- 
ing with the forest and its noble red inhabitants. Now where 
are they? The hands of civilization have crushed and rolled 
them hundreds of miles beyond the Mississippi. And in place 
of their wigwams and paths and pipes of peace, we find Towns 
and stately edifices, Canals, Railroads and Turnpikes, and 
society held together by written instruments. At Harrisburg 
the Canal leaves the river and goes back of the town a short 
distance from the yard of the Capitol. Where there is a num- 
ber of storehouses and landings that wear the appearance 
of business. There is but little of the town to be seen from the 
canal, there bering an elevation between it and the principal 
part. We arrived there at half past three in the afternoon. And 
went in an omnibus to our boarding house. Situated at the 
corner of Market and Front Streets, on the Susquehannah, near 
the bridge. We were comfortably entertained, the people are 
sociable and friendly. Next morning, the 20th, we went to the 
Capitol and spent the afternoon and took dinner at Isaac Ander- 
son's, market square. Returned in the afternoon to our boarding 
house accompanied by Mary A. Pennypacker. After tea we took 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 193 

a walk down the River to Thomas Elders. He resides in a 
spacious house formerly occupied by John Harris, the founder of 
Harrisburg, who now lies just in front of the house, by the 
stump of a large Mulberry tree that grew on the bank of the 
Susquehannah, and I have been informed was in a flourishing 
condition when William Penn commenced the settlement of the 
Province of Pennsylvania. Harris had been in the practice of 
trading with the Indians, whom he offended by refusing them as 
much rum as they wished and in consequence they dragged him 
out of his house and tied him to this tree with hickory withs, and 
prepared wood and piled around him intending to burn him alive. 
He begged for mercy but his feeling intricety incident to such a 
situation had no influence upon the minds of the savage Indian; 
they were determined to execute their design. Meanwhile his 
black man fled to a village of friendly Indians on the opposite 
shore and brought them to rescue him. 

A company of them landed in canoes in time to save him. 
One of them had the torch in his hand to set the wood on fire. 
And as he was rescued under the tree he requested to be buried 
there that the place might be remembered. It is enclosed with 
boards in the form of a pen. There is a painting representing 
the circumstances hanging in the Senate Chamber. And I was 
told that they intend adding a portion of the stump to the frame 
of the painting, that it may be preserved. The stump is eight 
or ten feet high and forked. As we returned we treated ourselves 
to some ice cream at half the price it is in Philadelphia and 
equally as good. Next morning, the 21st, Thomas Elder's wife 
and the deputie's daughter called to see us. After they left we 
went to Isaac Anderson's. In the afternoon we went over the 
bridge. It is said to be a mile long. We had a handsome view 
of the Capitol from the opposite shore. 

There is an Island in the river that divides the bridge. This 
Island is said to be very productive, there is a peach orchard on 
it. And the Citizens of Harrisburg are indebted to it for a large 
proportion of the vegetables brought to their market. The river 



194 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

supplies them with fish. The town near the river is a little 
elevated. And along the Northeastern part or back of the town 
there is a flat, that bears the appearance of having once passed a 
part of the river. Along this flat the Canal passss. 

There are a number of fine houses, and along front street, 
the street that is next the River. There is good taste displayed 
in the formation of yards and cultivation of shrubber}\ There 
are two markethouses. This is the seat of Government. The 
state Capitol and public buildings are situated in the northern 
edge of the town and occupy the most elevated position in the 
whole town. Their appearance is very commanding. The base- 
ment story has two large rooms, one for the Senate and one for 
the House of Representatives. And a Rotunda between them. 
The second story is occupied by the library and committe rooms. 
Above that there is a dome, from which a person has a good view 
of the town and surrounding country. Particularly the mount- 
ains up the river, and the Gaps in them, where the River passes 
through. In the evening we went to Frances Shank's, while we 
were there we had a heavy shower of rain. After it abated we 
returned to our boarding house and packed for starting. 

At eleven o'clock the omnibus came and took us to the wharf. 
We waited there until near oue. Before the boat arrrived. It 
being detained by a breach in the canal. I found it very un- 
pleasant entering the boat. It being shut up and all in their 
berths, arranged one above another on each side of the boat so 
near together that they almost touched each other if the persons 
are large. I slept but little, not being accustomed to the motion 
of the boat. And saw none of the Country from Harrisburg to 
Clark's Ferry a distance of fifteen miles. As soon as it was light 
I went on deck and it happened we were crossing the Susque- 
hannah. It was crossed by means of a pool formed by the con- 
struction of a low dam. The boat is towed by horses. Clarks 
Ferry bridge is used for a towing path. The river is a consider- 
able width. The eastern shore at this place is approached by 
quite a romantic and elevated mountain. Immediately opposite 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 195 

is Duncannous Island and the mouth of the Juniatta. There are 
locks a little above the mouth of the Juniatta. Which is the be- 
ginning of the Juniatta division. A short distance from the en- 
trance into this Canal, the Canal that leads up the Susquehannah 
to Northumberland diverges from it, and a little further we cross 
the Juniatta by an aqueduct, and passes along the south side of 
the River a distance of thirteen miles to Millerstown dam. 

The country along that distance is very undulating. The 
hills scarcely rise to the appilation of mountains except one which 
was pointed out called BufTaloe. Newport is situated ten miles 
from Clark's Ferry. The agriculture of the Country is not good. 
We crossed the Juniatta at the pool of Millerstown dam. The 
horses were carried over in a flat and the boat was towed by 
hitching on to it. We were soon wafted over by machinery that 
kept an endless rope in motion. After crossing the river we 
entered a section of Canal on the north side of the river and pass- 
ed Millerstown about two miles from the entrance. The popula- 
tion of Millerstown is rather spare and the town wears an ancient 
appearance. And is five miles from Newport. Eleven miles 
from the village of Mexico if in view, situated in an agricultural 
district not much like Newport only that it is smaller. Four 
miles further those that keep on deck watching the scenery of 
the Juniata its cultivated spots and the winding river espy Mifflin- 
town. The seat of justice of Mifflin County fifteen miles from 
Millerstown, more populus than it, but wears the same appear- 
ance. The next is Lewistown situated on the bank of the Canal 
fifteen miles from Mifflin. It has the appearance of more ani- 
mation than some of the other towns just passed. 

The whole country from Millerstown to Lewistown is undu- 
lating and mountainous. In some places where the mountain is 
indented by a stream uniting with the Juniata some flat and 
more gently rising hills are passed. There the hand of the 
agriculturist was observed. With these exceptions there appear- 
ed to be but little grain raised. Husbandry near the river is but 
little attended to. The hills were clad in nature's garments. And 



196 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

if the manufacturer of iron makes no inroad in upon them they 
will remain so in all probability for the lapse of ages. A few 
miles above Lewistown we passed through what is termed the 
long narrows. The elevation can be observed some distance. 
As it outtops all elevations East of it. The length of the narrows 
is eight miles, hence the name. The mountains on both sides are 
very steep. In some places they project a little and many others 
are almost perpendicular particularly near the top. 

There appeared to be a great ledge of massive rock. The 
elevation is supposed to be at least two thousand feet and they 
confine the river to a very narrow space. It was difficult to find 
space enough for a Canal and Turnpike. The mountains on both 
sides are covered with foliage except some places that have a large 
quantity of loose stone and rocks that must have been loosened 
from the large ledge at the top by the effects of time and tumbled 
and lodged promiscuously near the base. After passing the long 
narrows the sun soon became hid amongst the great world of 
mountains that intervenes. And it becoming damp admonished 
me to take to the cabin and get what repose I could between the 
thumps and noise that took place when we entered a lock. Al- 
though I had what was called a good berth I slept but little. 
First day the 22nd, we found ourselves in Huntingdon, having 
passed during the night I was informed a curosity quite as great 
as that of the long narrows, called Jack's Narrows. Hunting- 
don is forty-nine miles from Lewistown. It is the seat of justice 
of Huntingdon County; observed no peculiarity in relation to the 
town except being built in a wooden country the greater part of 
the buildings are wooden and they soon give a town an aged ap- 
pearance. 

It is closely built and contains a considerable population. 
We arrived there before sunrise stopped to leave off passengers 
and change horses. From Huntingdon we had slack water and 
in consequence went very fast. There were four horses to the 
boat which gave it such a rapid motion that sometimes the water 
flowed over the towing path. Seven miles further we passed 



Genealogy of the Coatcs Family, 197 

Petersburg, a small town, and the next town we came to was 
Alexandria seven miles from Petersburg. The canal passing 
through a portion of it. There are a number of very good brick 
houses in it. We took on passengers at the upper part of the 
town. The river makes a great bend here and glides along- the 
base of a large Mountain situated on the left side. And on the 
other side there are some farms. But we soon passed these and 
entered in between two precipices. 

I observed on the slope of the Mountain the north side of 
the Canal a stately and solitary rock of great height standing up 
like a spire terminating in many points. And it is but little 
larger at the base than it is near the top. The spire or rock ap- 
peared to lean a little toward the base of the precipice. It re- 
minded me of drawings I had seen of the great architecture. It 
is of a soft gray colour. The next town is Williamsburg thirteen 
miles from Alexandria. We crossed the river a number of times. 
The horses crossed on bridges every place except one. The num- 
ber of locks increases as we approach Hollidaysburg. Passing 
through the locks creates a strange feeling to those unaccustomed 
to traveling in packets particularly when in the cabin. We 
reached Hollidaysburg about four in the afternoon. Having 
passed Frakstown, ten miles distance from Williamsburg, 
when we were invited on deck to see the sight. It was 
Holidaysburg and its warf lined with cars and storehouses at the 
foot of the Allegheny Mountain. Here euds the Juniata Division 
of the Canal. It is one hundred and twenty miles long has 
ninety locks, eighteen dams and twenty-five aqueducts. Some 
of the aqueducts are grand and stately structures. The Juniata 
River generally is very circuitus and the hills and little valleys 
toward its mouth and its more bold high lands and mountains 
along its narrow passes, aud toward Hollida}'sburg makes its 
scenery highly romantic, and beautiful beyond anything to be 
met with. The passengers went directly on in cars to the summit. 
We remained in Hollidaysburg. It is situated at the base of the 
Allegheny Mountaiu and is surrounded with spurs of the mount- 



19S Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

ain. It contains some stores and good houses and is dependant 
on the public improvements. 

It is one hundred and seventy two miles from Columbia. 
The next morning; the 24th, we left there in a car and were drawn 
b}' horses to the foot of the first plane. We encountered five 
planes before we reached the summit. The cars were drawn up 
all the planes by stationary steam power. And on the short 
levels between the planes by horse power. The distance from 
Hollidaysburg to the summit is twelve miles. On the summit of 
the Mountain there is a public house kept by G. Marlet where 
we took an excellent breakfast. From there we proceeded to 
Johnstown, Situated at the western termination of the railroad 
twenty four miles and three quarters from the summit. In pass- 
ing there we descended five inclined planes, by the use of station- 
ary steam power. The cars with one exception were drawn by 
horses between the planes. This exception consists of a level 
about fourteen miles long between planes No. one and two upon 
which locomotive engines are used. Just at the head of plane 
number one, we passed through a tunnel nine hundred feet long, 
cut through solid rock. We reached Johnstown about eleven 
o'clock. 

Johnstown is situated on a flat of about two hundred acres 
completely surrounded with mountains, the buildings are chiefly 
frame. There is an excellent and capacious basin at this place, 
it occupies a space of eight acres and a half. And appears to 
me to be distinguished for nothing but its fine capacity for 
the accommodation for the trade and travel on the canal and 
railroad. Second day the 25th. We returned back to the sum- 
mit having found it necessary to spend a day or two on the road. 
And the house kept by G. Marlet being an excellent one the 
most agreeable of any we had met with, we concluded to make it 
our stopping place. A short distance from it the railroad crosses 
the Juniata and I think is not more than five feet wide. And on 
the west side of the mountain the Conemaugh takes its rise and 
runs along the railroad all the way to Johnstown with one or two 
exceptions. These two streams nearly interlock, they are not 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 199 

more than half a mile apart and form a gap in the mountain 
called Blair's Gap through which the road passes. The Conemaugh 
makes a bend of two miles in one place called the horseshoe, and 
conies nearly together again where the road crosses it on 
a viaduct of upwards of 8*4 feet in height, built out of stone. 
I believe there are nine streams which the railroad crosses. There 
are a few farms and others being made. They have pitched their 
tents and have commenced killing trees in backwoods style. 
Puncheon roofs and log chimneys situated along the road between 
Johnstown and the summit. On the summit we were elevated 
twenty three hundred and twenty six feet above Philadelphia. 

Fourth day seventh month 27th. Large coal fires and persons 
cloaked up like winter. This morning we returned to Johnstown 
and went on board the Pioneer a splendid packet boat no female 
on board but myself. The Johnstown basin is like a lake. 
Shortly leaving it we crossed the Conemaugh in an aqueduct and 
then commenced going through locks the boat being left down 
instead of being lifted up. It appears strange to me to see the 
water running west. Another aqueduct a few miles further and 
a good looking farm with excellent corn and grain in shock. 

After leaving this we entered in between two mountains for 
some distance. At length they began to lower down gradually, 
and some farms made their appearance. The land looked good 
but the buildings poor and country hilly except some flats along 
the river. Shortly after we came to this open country we passed 
through a small town. And twenty miles from Johnstown passed 
over the Conemaugh in an aqueduct to the south side of the 
river, passed through a town at the west end of the aqueduct 
called Lockport. Went a short distance and came to a small 
town called Boliver and crossed a stream in an aqueduct called 
Tug Mill Creek. It empties into the Conemaugh, not far from 
this there is slack water, along chestnut ridge. And there is a 
great bend to the left and then to the right. The ridge now be- 
comes very high so as to hide the sun at half past two in the af- 
ternoon. It appears perpendicular. The height of it reminds me of 



200 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

clouds I saw while in Johnstown. I was looking out of the 
window when a cloud went against a spur of the Allegheny a 
considerable distance from the top. This may appear incredible 
to some though it is a fact. A person who resides in that place 
told me he had frequently been at the foot of the monntains, 
when clouds went against them and the w T ater would pour down 
in torrents at that place and none elsewhere. 

We have now came into a cultivated country. Corn much 
like that of our own neighborhood, Westmoreland County. Next 
town is Blairsville. Conemaugh passing through it. It contains 
a number of brick houses on each side elevated from the River. 
The turnpike bridge crossing about the center. A storehouse just 
below four stories high. Blaresville is twenty eight miles from 
Johnstown. A short distance west of Blaresville there are some 
good farms, they were busy cutting grain, buildings good. Some 
distance further west we passed through a splendid tunnel nine 
hundred feet long and came out into an aqueduct across the Cone- 
maugh, it has seven arches. And what is remarkable, exactly 
over the tunnel, I was informed there is a house situated, and 
near it a good well of water. Passing through this tunnel by 
water, I shall always remember, it is romantic beyond descrip- 
tion. We passed it just before dark. 

Night soon came on and we saw nothing more until morning. 
Before day we crossed the Allegheny River in an aqueduct at the 
mouth of the Conemaugh, and entered the Canal on the north 
side of the Allegheny River. It is said to be navigable for steam- 
boats at some seasons of the year. Twenty four miles from 
Pittsburg we crossed an aqueduct over a stream that entered in- 
to the Allegheny. It looks more like living in this country than 
any 1 have seen since I left Columbia. During the night we 
passed Leechburg and Freeport. Nineteen miles from the aque- 
duct we passed Sharpsburg and crossed an aqueduct over a small 
stream that entered into the Allegheny. After passing this place 
a mile or two, I observed clouds of smoke rising in the air which 
denoted the location of Pittsburg. The Canal continues on the 
north side of the Allegheny. From Freeport all the way to 



Genealogy of the Coaics Family. 201 

Allegheny town, a town situated on the north side of the Alle- 
gheny River, exactly opposite Pittsburg. At Allegheny town 
the Canal branches. One branch of it is carried through Alle- 
ghen}' town on the same side of the River to communicate with 
the Ohio River immediately below the junction of the Allegheny 
and Monogahala. 

The other branch of the Canal is carried over the Allegheii}' 
River by means of a massive and supurb wooden aqueduct that 
passes through the City of Pittsburg, and Grant's Hill by 
means of a tunnel, and communicates with the Monongahala 
River. The Canal along which we have just passed from Johns- 
town to Pittsburg is styled the western division of Pennsylvania 
Canal, and is one hundred and four mtles long — ten dams, one 
spacious tunnel besides one at Pittsburg, and six aqueducts. 
Pittsburg is situated exactly in the junction of the Rivers. The 
branch of Canal last alluded to passes through the business part 
of it. The steamboat wharf is on the Monongahala. I observed 
about thirty steamboats lying there, some taking on freight and 
passengers, others unlaiding and some undergoing repair. I was 
told although the boats appeared large they were of the second 
class of boats, and bore no comparison to those that came up 
during the spring freshets. The boats that I saw appeared as long 
as the Delaware boats and were three stories high. Pittsburg is 
more distinguished for business than neatness and comfort. 

The manufacturing of Engines, different kinds of castings, 
and all the things to which iron is adapted together with cotton 
is carried on to great extent. All the machinery connected with 
their vast opperations is propelled by steam generated with coal 
of a very sulphurious nature. In the combustion of coal it throws 
out volumes of dense smoke, which gives ever3'thing in the City 
and vicinity a very sooty appearance. The exterior of the houses 
in the city and environs look like blacksmith shops. Grant's 
Hill forms the southern boundary of the City. It is sufficiently 
elevated to afford a very good view of the town. We went up 
on it but was soon glad to retreat on account of the smoke. 

They have no shade trees in the streets and it appears to me 



202 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

their pavements are never washed. Even their bedding is a stone 
color. If it was not for the smoke aud filth it wonld be a fine city 
handsomely situated along the two Rivers. And is much larger 
than I had any idea of. The surrounded country is elevated and 
thickly settled. I noticed a number of splendid buildings though 
a little tinged with the common color. They tell me the smoke 
extended several miles. We arrived here on Fifth day the 29th, 
about ten. Seventh day the 31st, we went on board a steamboat 
and bid adieu to Pittsburg the queen of filth and business. 

We sailed rapidly down the Ohio and soon began to breathe 
a clean atmosphere. About twelve miles below we passed the 
Harmony settlement, their town is elevated from the river. They 
ascend to it by steps in the bank from the waters edge. They 
stopped to leave off passengers. And a few miles below we pass- 
ed a town called Freeport, a business place. And landed at 
Beaver point thirty miles below Pittsburg and stopped at a large 
hotel situated at the junction of Ohio and Beaver Rivers, where 
we remained until towards evening, and then went about four 
miles up the Beaver River to a friend's house of the name of 
Edward Hoopes, who resides in a town called New Brighton 
situated on the east side of the Beaver River opposite the lower 
falls at the termination of the Beaver Canal. We passed Bridge- 
water, Sharren and Fallston. They are nearly all connected and 
I have no doubt will some day be called the same name, Beaver 
City. There is a range of mountains on each side of the River. 
On the west side the bluffs come up so near it that there is only 
room for one row of houses in places and the mountain close 
back of them, perpendicular to a great height so that the coal 
is thrown from the mouth of the mine holes down into some of 
their kitchen yards. These Mountains also contain alum and 
salt. 

The falls of Beaver is a succession of rapids commencing 
near the mouth of the River and extend several miles. The 
whole fall is sixty nine feet aud affords excellent water power I 
observe. M. T. C. Gould asserts that the power is sufficient for 
five huudred mills. We left friend Hoopses ou first-day morning 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 203 

the first day of 8th mo. and ascended the Beaver division Penn- 
sylvania Canal in a boat. Some places the boat was towed along 
in the dams that were thrown across the Beaver River for the 
purpose of feeding the Canal. This division of Canal passes 
through ; Beaver County. Twelve miles from the town of 
Beaver the Ouenessing Creek empties into the Beaver, The 
boat horses cross it by a bridge. 

There are several streams emptying into the Beaver and the 
Canal crosses two of them by aqueducts. The country along 
the Beaver is very rough and hilly and much like a wilderness 
until within about four miles from Newcastle. The country be- 
comes level and appears productive. I observed some houses and 
barns, and was informed that back of the hills and bluffs along 
the Beaver the country is level and settled. We reached New- 
castle about five o'clock in the afternoon and stopped with Jame s 
Sharer. Next morning eighth month 2nd, the Commissioners 
went to Mercer. We remained at Newcastle, Elijah being unwell 
with a billious complaint. Newcastle is but a few years growth I 
believe; it commenced with the improvements; it contains a num- 
ber of buildings chiefly frame. It is handsomely situated in 
the junction of Shenango and Neshannock. There ends the 
Beaver division of Canal, though they intend extending it 
along the Shenango River. On the morning of the 3rd we set 
out for Mercer. No stages from Newcastle and roads almost im- 
passable consequently no vehicles to be had except light wagons. 
One was procured for us and we set out about eleven. It was 
the roughest ride I ever had. Nothing very interesting on the 
road, the country wild and unimproved. 

Houses and barns with log roofs tied on with withs. And 
whole farms thickly timbered. Hay in progress aud grain of 
every kind among dead trees, corn poor with few exceptions. 
The land is said to be good. In my opinion it is much like our 
hard scrabble, very hilly and stony. We met the largest snake 
in the road I ever saw. It was a glossy black. The person who 
was with us said he had shot one which measured eight feet. 
We noticed flocks of colts in places along the wilderness some 



204 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

having cowbells on their necks. We arrived at Mercer about 
five. Mercer is the county seat of Mercer County, the Court 
House is situated in the center of the street. The town is small, 
buildings chiefly frame though there are some very good brick 
and stone houses. It is twenty miles from Newcastle. 

We left Mercer in a private conveyance for Meadville on the 
morning of the 4th of eighth month. We passed along a distance 
of fifteen miles to Georgetown a small village that did not appear 
to be noted for anything. The country around the town is im- 
proved to some extent. But I observed but little improvement 
on the way. The country is generally wild and uncultivated In 
some places saw them gathering their crops from amongst the 
dead trees. And other places the wheat was not ripe. The coun- 
try continues to be sowewhat hilly. There are however many fiats. 
Over these the road was constructed by placing logs and poles 
across them closely adjusted. It mokes a very disagreeable road 
to travel over. A considerable portion of the road is of this 
character. After refreshing at Georgetown w T e proceeded more 
speedily having a better road. A large proportion of the road 
had been made of poles, but a thick covering of earth having 
been recently put on it rendered it more agreeable to pass over. 
We noticed them covering the road, they made use of a 
curiously constructed shovel attached to a yoke of oxen and 
these animals appeared to understand their business perfectly. 
We discovered but little advantage in the improvement of the 
country until we were approaching Meadville.* 

The character of the country generally is much like it east 
of Georgetown. Meadville is handsomely situated in the valley 
of the French Creek. It makes a very handsome appearance 
from the top of a ridge about two miles from the town. The 
College, Churches and brick buildings are fully in view. We 
glided down the hill and around along the base of it some dis- 

*It is proper here to remark that about five miles from Meadville we 
crossed the outlet of Conneaut Lake. We passed it by a log bridge that ap- 
peared to float on the water. The country adjacent to the outlet is very 
marshy, and hundreds of acres appear to be a perfect swamp and marsh 
notwithstanding the country generally was so much elevated. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 205 

tance leaving a few beautiful farms to the right. The best spot 
of cleared land I have seen since I left Pittsburg. Departing 
from the base of the hill we crossed French Creek by a bridge 
and entered the .town. The favorable impression formed from 
the top of the ridge remained unchanged. 

The town is very neat. The people appear industrious 
and have showed a good degree of taste in the construction of 
many buildings. We stopped at Gibson's hotel, a brick building 
four stories high. I was taken very ill in the night with an at- 
tack of a billious nature and remained there four days. The 
family of James Gibson were very kind and obliging. His two 
daughters, Sarah and Francis, I shall remember with grateful 
emotions. They exibited to me a very goodly and affectionate feel- 
ing. 

Meadville is the county seat of Crawford County, thirty 
miles from Mercer. We left Meadville on second day, the 9th of 
eighth month and traveled by stage to Erie. As we left the 
town the road began to ascend and continued to do so for several 
miles. After reaching the level we had a good road. Passed 
some ver}' fine timbered land. In many places they have com- 
menced clearing. We passed a town containing a few very neat 
buildings, called Waterford, twenty two miles from Meadville. 
In this neighborhood, the agriculture of the country becomes 
better. The land is better and appears to be tilled with more 
care. I like the agriculture of Erie County better than any I 
have seen in the northwest. The farmers have barns in places 
weatherboarded, which is not the case in Mercer and some parts 
of Crawford. I must not forget to notice the timber from Mercer 
to Erie, it outstrips an}' I have seen except the west side of the 
Allegheny Mountain. Though the timber is generally very large 
on the side of the Allegheny. 

The distance from Waterford to Erie is sixteen miles. As 
we descended the gently sloping grounds toward the lake, with- 
in six or eight miles of it, the vast expanse of water so extensive 
that it appeared to the eye to be connected with the firmament and 
is very grand and beautiful. We reached the town of Erie about 



206 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

four o'clock. It is handsomely situated on one of the bays of 
Lake Erie, called the ba}' of Presque Island. The town is but 
of few years growth, and promises in consequence of its great 
natural advantages to become a city. The harbor is very capa- 
cious, and on it I am told Perry gained the victory. The hulls 
of some of the ships are still to be seen lying on the shore of the 
peninsula, east of the town. On a little bluff on the shore of the 
lake the soldiers were interred that were killed. And close by 
this place and near what is called the old lighthouse, General 
Anthony Wayne was interred. The spot where he was laid is 
said to be a terror to the Indians to this day. 

The town of Erie is laid out on an extended scale and is 
susceptible of being made very handsome. It contains at present 
many fine buildings. A canal from the Pennsylvania Canal at 
Pittsburg is expected to intersect the lake at this place. Also a 
railroad by way of the west branch. Dr. Johns stated that he 
emigrated to the place fourteen years ago, and at that time there 
were few frame buildings. 

Just below the town there is a large breakwater in the lake 
to protect the harbor. The wharves extend into the Lake a con- 
siderable distance, and between them floating grocery stores are 
situated. On fifth day, the 11th, we left Erie in the steamboat 
North America for Buffalo. We went on board at seven o'clock 
in the morning and arrived in Buffalo about five, a distance of 
ninety miles. Considering the nature of the lake we had a 
pleasant trip. We stopped at a town on the way called Dunkirk, 
forty-five miles from Erie. We tarried there a short time and 
then set out again with sails hoisted in addition to the steam. I 
noticed several lighthouses on the way to direct vessels at night. 

Our distance from the American shore of the lake generally 
was about two to three miles. We had some wind, but the 
vessel being very large, three hundred and fifty tons burthen, it 
was not tossed very much, though to me being unaccustomed to 
seeing the like it appeared to foam and froth frightfully. The 
lake is a vast expanse of water and with the exception of rolling 
billows it is not much unlike the Ocean. It is about two hun- 



Genealogy oj the Coaies Family. 207 

dred and seventy miles long and one hundred in width. The 
water is a grenish color and quite transparent. Turning the 
attention to the north as the huge boat glides along the watery 
world below nothing is observed within the scope of human 
vision but an immense expanse of an element the habitation of 
fishes and the receptacle of many an enterprising individual who 
found a watery grave by floating his barge on its sometimes tem- 
pestuous surface. 

As we approached the outlet of the lake, Buffalo came in 
view, we participated in a general joy, as dark wind clouds were 
visible and the lake was becoming more turbulent. It is proper 
here to remark that this lake or great inland sea is at some sea- 
sons of the year very tempestuous, and as aweful to the navi- 
gator as the Atlantic Ocean. About seven in the evening there 
was a considerable storm, and during our day at Erie, there 
was a terrific stom that lasted two days and one night. Many 
vessels were driven out of their course. Many that had it in 
their power made to shore for safety; and some were lost. We 
observed the masts of a vessel on our voyage down that was sunk 
by the storm. 

These storms occur during the fall months and early in the 
spring, most frequently. As we drew near Buffalo it was aston- 
ishing to see the steamboats and shipping that lay along the 
warf. We landed safe and found a busy multitude and a number 
of hacks waiting to convey passengers to their different hotels. 
We were taken to the Eagle. On our way up through the town 
we saw nine Indians. They were the first I had seen, some were 
bareheaded, and some had hats on and blankets. We tarried at 
Buffalo that night. I was very much surprised to find a town 
so large and replete with life and animation. It is extending 
rapidly, the buildings are large and excellent, many of them 
would do credit to our Atlantic Cities. There were about two 
hundred persons at the hotel we stopped at. I was informed it 
required about fifty persons to attend to the business of the house. 

Buffalo is situated at the outlet of Lake Erie, and is quite a 



208 Genealogy of the Coatr.s Family. 

city. Population more than 18,000, with about 2500 buildings. 
It has sprung into notice within'a few years and must continue to 
flourish as it is situated at the commencement of steam naviga- 
tion, and the western termination of the New York Canal. We 
left this place of enterprise on the morning of the 12th, and 
traveled down along the shore of the Niagara River to the Falls 
of the Niagara by stage. There are some very good improve- 
ments along the river. Passed Black Rock, three miles below 
Buffalo. It is a smart little town. Shortly after passing Black 
Rock, Grand Island came in view, we had it in prospect until we 
came within a few miles of the falls. This is the island M. Noah 
was about purchasing a few years ago with the view of mak- 
ing it an asylum for his scattered brethren, the Jews. It is said 
to be twelve miles long and from two to seven broad. 

We passed Tonawanda at a distance of twelve miles. This is 
also a lively little place. Here the Canal diverges from the river. 
The soil is rather a heavy clay. Observed Chipeway on the 
Canada side, three miles above the falls and one mile above the 
battleground. Near this there is a burning spring enclosed by 
a small building. A barrel is placed over the spring, which has 
a cover with a tube in it through which the gas, sulphurate hydro- 
gen escapes, when a light is applied it ignites and burns brilliantly. 
We reached the falls, that magnificent and sublime wonder of 
nature, about twelve o'clock. These falls are situated below 
Grand Island on the Niagara River, about twelve miles from 
Lake Erie, and fourteen miles from Lake Ontario. This river 
unites the waters of these two lakes and is from one and a half 
to six miles wide. 

Above the falls the banks are said to be from one to two 
hundred feet in heighth, and immediately below not less than 
three hundred feet, at which heighth they continue as far as 
Lewistown where they suddenly fall off to about twenty feet. 

The river at the falls is about one mile in width, the cataract 
pours over a concave summit, and falls on the American side per- 
pendicularly one hundred and sixty-four feet. The horseshoe 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 209 

falls on the Canada side, descends in a curved form projecting 
about fifty feet from its base, to the distance of one hundred and 
fifty-eight feet. The descent of the rapids above the falls is 
about fifty-eight feet, making the whole height over two hundred 
feet. There is a circular stairway enclosed and suspended from 
table rock on the Canada side by means of timbers that enables a 
person to go down to the shore of the river below the sheet. At 
the foot of these stairs commences the passage under the great 
sheet of water. There is said to be a tolerably good green sort 
of light within this singular cavern, but the wind blows with 
alarming violence from the pool up against the rocks throwing 
deluges of water. My curiosity was satisfied without going to 
this frightful place. 

The falls on the American side is divided from the British 
Falls by Goat Island which stands on the very verge of the preci- 
pice. They are truly' magnificent. A flight of stairs has been 
erected a few rods below the falls descending to the ferry where 
a boat is always ready to convey passengers to the opposite shore. 
After going down these stairs we went as near the perpendicular 
pitch as we could without being wet with the spray. Here there 
are piles of petrified moss to the height of six or eight feet, it is 
green and always wet. 

This pitch faces Canada and the water, as it pours over ap- 
pears in white and green streaks. A bridge is constructed across 
the rapids to Bath Island a quarter of a mile above the falls 
which is connected to Goat Island by means of another bridge. 
At the toll-house on Bath Island is kept for sale a good collection 
of minerals and other curiosities of the country, consisting in 
part of reticules and other specimens of apparel very ingeniously 
wrought I was told by the Indians in that vicinity. Brig Island 
is near and is connected with Bath Island by a narrow bridge. 
It is said to resemble the main and quarter decks of a brig. 

Goat Island, some times called Iris, is laid out in walks, 
which are shaped by a great variety of the lofty trees of the 
American forest. It is said to have derived its name from the 



210 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

fact of an aged and venerable goat having resided there and held 
undisputed right there for several years prior to its being trodden 
on by human feet. On Goat Island there are several manufac- 
tories. 

The descent of fifty-eight feet above the falls or perpendicu- 
lar pitch affords excellent water power. And I observed by 
throwing a little wing dam from the shore, an amount of water 
could be commanded equal to any purpose. And it would appear 
from this, that Manchester on the American side might become 
the manufacturing Manchester of America, There aie many 
fine views of the rapids above, and of the grand fall on the Can- 
ada side from several points on the Island, 

Tarapin Bridge extends about ten feet over the precipice of 
the Cresent Fall and affords a splendid view, though one that 
intimidates the gentle and makes the brave stand still. It 
naturally excites queer emotions to find oneself suspended, as it 
were, in midair, over a yawning precipice and causes an involun- 
tary shudder as we turn our eyes from the giddy depths, and 
ever falling cataract. 

The Cataract of Niagara, the grandest spectacle in the world, 
suddenly burst upon the sight of its first visitors, who could con- 
template nature in her wild native dress, must have stuck their 
senses more potently, and excited their feeling more intensely 
than it can now do of those who see it surrounded by cultivated 
fields, and monuments of art. What can we imagine more beau- 
tiful, more truly sublime, than a majestic river suddenly con- 
tracted into less than half its former width, after tumbling over 
a bed of large rocks, precipitated, roaring as it were, with very 
terror, into a dark caldron below maddened and lashed into foam 
white as the driven snow, and throwing up a thick column of 
spray towering to the arch of Heaven. A cloud that is seen to 
hang over the falls by those navigating Erie and Ontario, is 
seen by spectators a hundred miles from each other. 

Add to this impression on the eye, that made upon the ear, 
and our own senses partake of the wild tumult of the scene. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 211 

Confused, we leave the spot with a true idea of the vast, the 
grand, the sublime. We left the village of Manchester on the 
13th, by stage for Lockport. Leaving the falls we passed down 
the bank of the Niagara River about four miles. We had a view 
of the falls at a distance of two miles below. The indentations 
were very striking that the river has made by its passage through 
the table rocks. The river is very narrow and extremely rapid. 
In some places a person might jerk a stone across. Just before 
we diverge from the river in the direction of Lockport, Queens- 
town height upon which stands Brock's monument, the outlet of 
Lake Ontario, and the landing at Lewistown was in view. This 
monument was erected by the people of Upper Canada in memory 
of Isaac Brock who fell in action with the Americans in 1812. It 
has a base of about twenty feet square, with a spiral shaft ex- 
tending to a height of one hundred and twenty-six feet. A 
statue of Brock is intended to be placed on its summit. It is 
located on the heights about a quarter of a mile from Queens- 
town. 

The country between the Falls and Lockport is level, and it 
appears to me not very fertile. We passed through two villages, 
Cambria and Tuscarofa. The latter, a village inhabited by In- 
dians. Some of their houses were frame others log and some wig- 
wams covered with bark. The stage driver stopped to water his 
horse at one of the houses where I saw a number of children and 
observed one that was too young to walk and was fastened on a 
board and hung by a string in front of the house. The}^ prefer 
being out in the open air. We saw a number of them at work 
before their doors. They sat on the bare ground to sew, as many 
as five and six in company. I saw one at work in her garden 
with a blanket over her head. They retain their characteristic 
of Indian habit. They appeared very social toward each other, 
and I was told they exercise great ingenuity in making moccasins 
and belts. They are a relic of the once noble Senaca tribe, and 
notwithstanding they appear to preserve their Indian costume and 
habit, some of them I learned were well educated and are becom- 



212 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

ing initiated into civilized habits. They are harvesting, I ob- 
served them hauling wheat with two horses in a wagon, and 
some use oxen. We met a number of them on our way to Lock- 
port , some with large burthens on their backs. These burthens are 
supported by being fastened to a band that fits around the head. 
We also met two female Indians riding along very merrily on 
one horse. They had nothing on their heads and left their long 
black hair flow down their backs. 

We reached Lockport about one o'clock. It is twenty-three 
miles distance from the falls. A short time after our arrival we 
proceeded on in a packet boat. Lockport is a village of consider- 
able business. In 1821 there w T ere but two houses at this place, 
now there are about four hundred, and is distinguished for the 
large amount of lockage overcome consisting of five chambers of 
thirteen feet each. The locks are double and are situated in the 
center of the town. We reached Medina, distant eighteen miles 
from Lockport, by evening where we tarried during the night. 
The country between Lockport and Medina is not more than 
ordinarialy fertile, very level as we did not pass a single lock, 
and it appears to be new, the fields generally abound in stumps. 

Medina is a village containing some manufactories but never 
will be large as the water power is very limited, being confined 
to an ordinary mill stream. We left Medina on the morning of 
the 14th, in a packet boat. We soon discovered our journey was 
not to be agreeable. The boat was a contracted thing, as much 
unlike the packet boats of Pennsylvania as the mind can well 
conceive. And I was informed that all the packet boats west of 
Rochester were of this description. We glided along in our teter- 
ing little bark eight miles and reached Knowesville. The country 
wears the same appearance, observed grain in shock and some 
not reaped. 

The next town is Albion, the seat of justice of Orleans 
County, distant ten miles from Medina. In this town there are 
a number of fine brick houses, and it wears a very respectable ap- 
pearance. The country around it is very level, and the timber 



Genealogy of the Coates Family 213 

does not appear as large as I saw in Pennsylvania. After passing 
a number of unimportant villages, we arrived at Brockport, fifteen 
miles distant from Albion. Brockport, I am informed, derived its 
name from Hiel Brockway, its founder. There is a fine degree 
of taste displayed in the construction of buildings. The town 
has sprung up within ten or twelve years. 

The country still continues level and wears the appearance 
of having been cleared but recently. I suppose that the first 
trees that were cleared out of the way was done for the purpose 
of clearing a place to make the canal, about sixteen years ago, 
which was soon followed by the axe to prepare the way for the 
cultivator of the soil. Many parts of Pennsylvania the farmers 
are troubled with rocks, here they are as much troubled with 
stumps. 

The houses in this country are principally frame, there are 
no buildings that a person from Chester County could call a barn. 
I suppose on what they consider their best farms, nothing will 
be seen but a stable, of a size that I would think well adapted to 
a two acre lot. 

We passed Spencers Basin eight miles from Brockport. 
There is a great indentation of the earth immediately east of 
Spencers Basin, and with the view of avoiding it they had to 
make a great bend in the canal, about one mile and a half we 
glided away round in the packet boat and did not gain more 
than half a mile in a direct line. Twelve miles further we reached 
the City of Rochester. We were landed at a large basin in the 
interior of the city about six o'clock in the evening, having 
traveled forty-five miles the distance from Medina. We stopped 
at the Eagle Hotel, and found everything commodious, comfort- 
able and extremely neat. Rochester is situated on both sides of 
the Genesee River. The river passes through it from North to 
South and the canal passes through the center of the town also, 
from West to East. The canal is carried over the river by an 
aqueduct built of solid masonery. The aqueduct is eight hun- 
dred and four feet long, has eleven stone arches and is elevated 



214 Genealogy of the Co cites Family, 

fourteen feet above the surface of the river. There is consider- 
able rapid in the river at the town and about a quarter of a mile 
below the town the great falls of the Genesee River are found, 
the fall is ninety-seven feet in height. 

These rapids and falls afford an excellent water power, and 
I was informed therein the vicinity of the city, eleven mills are 
capable of grinding twelve thousand bushels of wheat every 
twenty-four hours. In the 3 r ear, eighteed hundred and twelve, 
the ground now occupied by the City of Rochester, was a wilder- 
ness. And wonderful as it may appear, in the short space of 
twenty years, we find a city with a population of twelve thousand 
and about 2000 buildings, many of them large and excellent. 
What a contrast the forest has yielded to perseverance and in- 
dustry. And instead of being the abode of wild animals it is 
now the seat of canals, large manufacturing establishments and 
a busy and animated people. 

At eight o'clock on the morning of the 15th of eighth month, 
we left Rochester in a stage and expected to see a finely improved 
country around so extensive a town but found the contrast very 
great. The buildings, fences and agriculture generally very 
much neglected. I believe the prevailing custom here is to build 
up a handsome town and leave the country run chance. At the 
distance of seven miles we passed Pittsville a pleasant looking little 
village. As we advanced East of Pittsville the country became 
extremely hilly, many of the hills over which we passed were 
steep and long. The country generally cleared and settled and 
was in a state of ordinary fertility. Passed several villages and 
after being tossed over a number more hills we arrived at Can- 
andaigua. The most beautiful town I have yet seen. It is situ- 
ated at the outlet of Canandaigua Lake twenty-eight miles from 
Rochester. The lake extends in a North and South direction 
and is from one to two miles wide and fourteen miles long. The 
inhabitants are said to be very wealthy. It appears to be a place 
of retirement for those that have accumulated by mercantile and 
other adventurous pursuits. 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 215 

The streets are wide and adorned with trees, and in addition 
to this the buildings, especially iu the western part of the town, 
are put a sfficient distance from the street to afford a fine yard 
before them, which are elegantly decorated with shrubbery. The 
streets are neatly paved under a thick shade of trees. But a 
small part of the town is occupied with any kind of trade and 
that is the part that bounds on the margin of the lake. We par- 
took of an excellent dinner and then pursued our journey in 
stage. We went along with more rapidity having a more level 
country to pass over. The agriculture is much better than that 
passed during the forenoon. 

Having advanced fifteen miles from Canandaigua brought 
us to Geneva. This town is delightfully situated on the east side 
of Senica Lake. The buildings are handsome and tastely ar- 
ranged with shade trees and gardens. The bank of the lake is 
middling high and descends gradually to the margin of the water, 
and is laid out in fine yards with circuitous walks adorned with 
beautiful shrubbery. It is a place of considerable business and 
enjoys a connection with Grand Canal by what is termed the 
outlet of the lake. And also the steamboat navigation of the 
lake, which is considerable being about thirty-five miles in ex- 
tent from North to South and from three to four miles wide. 
Although Geneva is situated on the western side of the lake it is 
but a few miles from its southern termination. And leaving it 
we traveled along the shore of the lake and having reached the 
outlet and passed some distance along it we arrived at Waterloo. 
The distance from Geneva to Waterloo is seven miles. A portion 
from Geneva to Waterloo is very sand} 7 . Waterloo is situated 
on the outlet of Seneca Lake and derives considerable advantage 
from the water power of the outlet and appears to be a thriving 
village. 

The next place of importance is Seneca Falls. A town bear- 
ing the same name, has sprung up here. The place enjoys ex- 
cellent water power derived from the falls which have a descent 
of forty-six feet. The town has also the advantage of a canal 



216 Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 

that is made along the outlet from Seneca Lake and that com- 
municates with the grand Erie Canal, a considerable number of 
manufactories and mills are established here. It is four miles 
from Waterloo and promises in consequence of its superior ad- 
vantages to much surpass it in size and grandure. Three miles 
further brought us to Bridgeport, a village situated on the west- 
ern margin of Cayuga Lake. Saw nothing of interest or promise 
at this village. 

The lake is thirty miles long from North to South and from 
one to two miles wide. It is deep enough for steamboat naviga- 
tion, and is surrounded, I was informed with an excellent agri- 
cultural country except about the outlet at its northern termina- 
tion, which is very marshy. We crossed the lake on a bridge 
one mile and one-tenth of a mile long within about three miles 
of the northern termination of the lake. The bridge is supported 
by large timbers. There is also a village called Cayuga at the 
end of the bridge on the eastern margin of the lake, in appear- 
ance like Bridgeport. After leaving the lake a few miles the 
road became quite hilly and the country generally appeared un- 
dulatory. The unpleasant motion of the stage over hilly roads 
connected with having traveled, when we reached Auburn, about 
seventy miles, made me rejoice when we reached the town. We 
tarried there until four o'clock the next morning. I found a few 
hours repose very sweet. Auburn is seven miles from Cayuga 
County and I am informed contains six thousand inhabitants, 
court house, seminary, and is distinguished as being the seat of the 
state prison, however melancholy it appears to me that mankind 
should so depart from the path of recitude as to be restrained by 
human laws and massive walls. It is nevertheless humane as by 
this plan. Solitary confinement and opportunities for reforma- 
tion is adopted in the place of the uncivilized method heretofore 
too long practiced, of putting poor unfortunate beings to death. 
I learned that the persons now confined there exceeds six hun- 
dred, that they are engaged cheerfully and under good discipline 
at the different vocations and make enough to support themselves. 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 217 

Auburn is a handsome town containing spacious hotels beau- 
tiful dwellings and stores, and streets wide and finely ornamented 
with trees. On third day, 16th, we left Auburn by stage at 4 
a. m., and after riding seven miles, passed Skeneatalas, in Onon- 
dagua County, a village beautifully situated on a lake of same 
name. The lake is sixteen miles long and from one and a half 
to two miles wide. Manufactories exist here to some extent. 
The buildings are good and the adjacent country is very fertile. 
Six miles further over a rather hilly road brought us to Marcellus, 
in Onondagua County. During this ride we passed an encamp- 
ment of Indians. They were supposed to be a relic of the once 
powerful Seneca tribe, and were emigrating westward. I think 
there were about twenty-five or thirty of them. They were just 
arising from nature's bed, the damp ground, as we passed. They 
had a wagon and two horses. During their journey they encamp 
out instead of taking shelter in some civilized abode. At Mar- 
celius we took breakfast. It is a small village located in the val- 
ley of Otisco. There is a stream passing through the valley, 
that affords power sufficient for some manufactories. The valley 
is narrow and the hills are very bold. 

In passing from Marcellus we ascended a long hill which 
brought us on an upland and hilly country. We passed a succes- 
sion of hills and I observed some very high and prominent bluffs. 
The soil and agriculture of the country is ordinary. Among the 
hills, there is one called Onondagua hill, eight miles from Mar- 
cellus. The summit of which affords a fine view of several vill- 
ages, Onondagua Lake and the surrounding country. I am in- 
formed this vicinity is distinguished for Indian antiquity near 
here the Six Nations held council, it is also proper to remark that 
petrifactions of various kinds abound. 

From here we diverged from the main road and went to 
Syracuse, a town of great importance being the seat of very ex- 
tensive salt manufactures. The water from which the salt is 
made is obtained from a spring that rises to the surface of the 
ground and is so strongly impregnated with salt that thirty-six 



218 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

gallons of water will make a bushel. I was informed that upward 
of two millions of bushels of salt was manufactured at this place 
last year. Two miles west of Syracuse there is a village called 
Gettys, a number of salt springs have been discovered at this 
place. And one mile and a half north of Syracuse, Salina is 
situated. The first salt spring was discovered at this place by 
Indians from the circumstance of its being visited by deer and 
other animals. And it is from springs at this place that the salt 
is made. It is forced to an elevation of eighty feet to a resevoir 
from whence it is conveyed in pipes to the different manufactur- 
ing establishments. Syracuse is a handsome town and will be the 
center of a dense population, as the manufacture of salt bids fair 
to become very extensive. The salt is made by the application 
of artificial heat and solar evaporation, the vats used for the latter 
process cover nearly three hundred acres. 

The grand canal passes through this place. And from this 
point also diverges northward thirty-eight miles to Oswego on 
Lake Ontario. From Syracuse to Manlius, distance eleven miles 
we passed over a level country rather fertile in the vicinity of 
the canal. Manlius is a small town containing about two hundred 
houses and some manufacturies of cotton, situated on Limestone 
Creek. Four miles further is Chittenango. Going from Manlius 
to Chittenango a hill is crossed of considerable elevation which 
affords a commanding and picturesque view of Onondaga Lake 
and Onondaga hill. 

Chittenango is situated in a valley and is quite an animated 
place, as it abounds to some extent with manufacturies and is 
connected with the grand canal by a navigable feeder one and 
one half miles long. I was informed also that gypsum is found 
in great abundance as well as petrifiications of various kinds, and 
organic remains. 

Leaving Chittenango we passed a loug hill and gained the 
top of an elevated and rather undulating country. Eight miles 
from Chittenango we came to Lenox where we dined — a little 
village situated one mile from the Erie Canal, a place that was for- 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 219 

merly occupied by the Oneida and Tuscarora Indians. There are 
still a few of them partly civilized scattered about that remind us 
in connection with the relics they have left behind what they 
once were. A journey of twenty-two miles further brought us 
to the city of Utica. Having passed two small villages called 
Vernon and New Hartford, within about five miles of Utica the 
country being level, pretty well improved and tolerably fertile. 
The rest of the country is rather hilly and in an ordinary state of 
agriculture. 

Utica is a place that participates deeply in the prosperity 
caused by the improvements of New York. In 1813 its popula- 
tion was 1700, and now it is computed to be ten thousand. The 
town is very haudsome and interesting. The taste displayed by 
the inhabitants in the construction of buildings and the appear- 
ance of the streets, and the enterprise connected with the business 
of the canal is very laudable. I was informed that the place is 
also distinguished for its literary and charitable institutions. It 
is situated on the site of Fort Schyuler,on the south side of Mohawk 
River. The Eire Canal passes through the center of the town 
and the Schenectady and Utica Railroad terminates in the north- 
ern boarder of it. The warehouses on the canal are very large 
and neat. After reposing at an excellent hotel one night very 
comfortably we departed for Albany at eight o'clock in the morn- 
ing of the 17th. in a railway car. The arrangements in relation 
to the passengers are good. When we went to take our seats we 
were conducted into a spacious building called a car house accom- 
panied with a ticket that designated the car and appartment of it 
we were to occupy. We seated ourselves and in a few minutes 
heard a tap of the bell and away we went. 

After passing a mile or two we crossed the Mohawk by a 
bridge, -and continued down the northern side until we reached 
within a mile of Schenectady where we crossed by a fine 
bridge. The canal is located on the north side of the Mohawk 
all the way from Utica to Schenectady. 

The principle settlements, villages and improvements are on 



220 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

that side. We passed through the village of Harkimer fifteen 
miles from Utica. This is rather an ancient looking town, not 
very large, and does not appear to flourish. Seven miles further 
we passed Little Falls a small town, the name of which I presume 
is derived from a succession of rapids or falls in the river at this 
place. The spot is romantic, the bluffs on both sides which con- 
tinue about two miles, confine the river, the canal, railroad, and 
turnpike road to a little space; the turnpike is on the northern 
side of the railway. The bed of the river and adjoining bluffs 
are very rocky. 

There are many bold and picturesque elevations. The most 
prominent of which is called Anthony's Nose. There are several 
manufactures at this place, and if all the water power could 
be employed it might become a place of importance. The canal, 
railroad and turnpike are very difficult to make, great massive 
rocks had to be removed by the use of powder to make places for 
them all. West of Little Falls there is a delightful and fertile 
plain called German Flats. With the exception of these flats the 
valley of the Mohawk is very contracted, and the agriculture is 
not very extensive nor is it very good. The buildings, arrange- 
ments of fields and fences, are far from denoting a high degree of 
taste. 

Fultouville, Canajoharie, an Indian name signifying boiling 
pot, and Fort Plain are villages situated on the canal between 
Little Falls and Schenectady. Schenectady is fifty-eight miles 
from Little Falls, situated on the south side of the Mohawk. 
It enjoys the canal passing through its borders and the termina- 
tion of the Utica and Schenectady Railroad within its northern 
limits, and that of the Albany and Schenectady within its southern 
limits. 

We were landed by the Utica Railroad in the northern part 
of the town, and had to transport ourselves to the Albany Kail- 
road, the best way we could. Schenectady is not a very pleas- 
ant place, and does not appear to flourish like many other New 
York towns. Probably it is retarded by its contiguity to Albany. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 221 

It is quite an ancient looking place, and is said to contain a pop- 
ulation of five thousand, and a college. After much bustling 
and confusion, we started for Albany, distant fifteen miles by the 
Schenectady & Albany Railroad. Directly after leaving the town 
we were drawn up an inclined plane. Having gained the top be- 
came attached to a locomotive and set off on rapid style. We 
traveled much more rapidly by far than I ever traveled before, 
we supposed at the rate of thirty miles an hour. Albany was 
soon in view. After leaving the head of the inclined plane the 
ground was covered for a few miles with nothing but pitch pine 
only a few feet high. After leaving these pines we came out on 
a perfect sandy desert. 

The country between Schenectady and Albany is the most 
trackless and desert like country I saw during my whole journey. 
It was nothing but light sand. And in some places was so light 
and dry that it would drift like snow. After leaving the vicinity 
of Schnectady there was no improvement until we reached the 
vicinity of Albany. It is truly a trackless and dreary waste. 
We reached Albany in the afternoon. Albany is the seat of Gov- 
m ernment of the State of New York, and is situated on the west- 
ern side of the Hudson River, at the head of navigation for large 
steamboats. The tide flows as far up as Troy but the river is 
navigable for only the second class of steamboats above Albany. 
The Erie Canal terminates at this place. The canal from Sche- 
nectady pursues the course of the Mohawk, and approaches the 
Hudson River at the mouth of the Mohawk River, eight miles 
above Albany. 

And from the mouth of the Mohawk it is brought down the 
western bank of the Hudson to its termination in a fine and 
spacious basin immediately in front of the northern part of the 
city. Canal boats, sloops, and steamboats lined the basin and 
the outer bank of it, presenting quite the appearance of a com- 
mercial city. The population of Albany is about, as I was in- 
formed, thirty thousand. Its situation is very peculiar, being 
located on sloping ground. The ground slopes toward the river. 



222 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

After leaving the river the ground for some distance rises gradu- 
ally, but upon approaching the western part of the city it raises 
very abruptly. State street is at right angles with the river, it is 
broad and spacious and has the State Capitol located on it, near 
its western termination on quite an eminence. The state build- 
ings are very large and some of them elegant. 

There are a number of spacious dwellings and stores. I ob- 
served some with the gable ends fronting the street, which I 
learned were some of the ancient buildings put up by the first 
settlers, the Dutch. Previous to the construction of the canal, 
there were many such, but more recently they have given way 
to the spirit of improvement and luxury that appears to pre- 
vail. 

The sight now occupied by Albany was one of the earliest 
settlements of the country. I am informed it is next in order, as 
regards time, to that of Jamestown in Virginia, and was com- 
menced by some emigrants from Holland about the year, 1612. 
The Hollanders yielded to the English on the 24th of September, 
1664, by whom the place was named Albany, in compliment to 
the Duke of York and Albany. 

On the morning of the 18th, we left Albany by steamboat 
for New York, distance 154 miles. We went on board the boat 
at seven o'clock in the morning, and soon found ourselves float- 
ing on the waters of the Hudson, a course due south, and at the 
rate of from twelve to fifteen miles an hour. Greenbush is nearly 
opposite Albany; a steam ferry boat plies between the two places. 
Overslaugh about five miles below Albany, is a place where 
the channel is very shoally and narrow and the steamboats are 
obliged to lay to for an hour or two until the tide rises. It is 
said they have expended an immense sum for the improvement 
of the channel, but it soon fills up again. Albany is in sight of 
this place. Passed Van Wies Point on the west side, Hogeberg, 
which in English signifies high hill, on the east side; Castileton 
and Schodack both on the east side, and arrived at New Balti- 
more, situated on the west side of the river and which is one hun- 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 223 

dred and thirty miles from New York. The towns occur so fre- 
quently with our rapid mode of traveling, that I can but mention 
the names of many of them. Though some of the most import- 
ant of them were pointed out by persons on board the boat, who 
were able to give a small history of them. A short distance from 
New Baltimore is Stuyvesant Landing. It is said to contain 
about fifty houses, and nearly opposite to it is a lighthouse 
erected in 1829. Next comes Coxsaekie Landing on the west 
side about 125 miles from New York. It is quite an enterprising 
place and contains a shipyard in which many sloops, steamboats, 
and canal boats have been built. A number of sloops sail daily 
from here to New York. Observed Columbiaville about a quarter 
of a mile from the river on the east side and situated on Kinder 
Hook Creek. 

The scenery in this vicinity is of a wild and romantic charac- 
ter. Four Miles Point, so called, is a high rocky point of land 
opposite Columbiaville. Next town is Athens, on the west side, 
it is an animated place, located on plains gently sloping towards 
the river. A canal has been cut through a level marshy island 
in the river with the view of accommodating intercourse between 
this place and Hudson which is situated nearly opposite on the 
east side of the river, and through which ferry boats ply. 

Hudson is a handsome town and I am informed is the largest 
on the river between Albany and New York. Its population is 
is said to be six thousand. It is elevated, being situated on a 
plain the bank of which rises from the river in the form of an 
abrupt bluff to the height of sixty feet, In the vicinity of Hud- 
son there is fine water power which adds very much to the im- 
portance of the town. We next landed at Catskill, 110 miles 
from New York. This is a considerable town and is said to con- 
tain a population of fourteen hundred. It is the leading place 
for those who visit the Catskill Mountain House. Catskill creek 
empties into the Hudson at the south side of the town and forms 
a harbor. It is a fine stream. Catskill Mountain House is a 
very large building situated on one of the greatest elevations in 



224 Genealogy of the Coaies Family, 

the range of mountains that bear the name. And although it is 
some miles distant it can be observed from favorable positions on 
the river with the naked eye. 

After leaving Albany, until we approached this place, the 
country along both sides of the river appeared to be under culture 
as far as the eye could scan, but now the vision is becoming 
bounded, particularly on the west side of the river with moun- 
tains, but we still see here and there a cultivated spot. The 
range of mountains we are approaching is a continuation of the 
range of Allegheny Mountains that cross Pennsylvania. Sailing 
along I observe some fine mansions, amongst which are those of 
Harmon Livingston, Esq., and Henry Barclay, Esq. Redhook 
Landing can be observed on the east side of the river one hundred 
miles from New York. In this vicinity there are a number of 
elegant mansions belonging to the Livingstons, I. C. Stephen and 
I. C. Montgomery. Columbus Point is the next object of attrac- 
tion. It is ninety miles from New York, and is on the west side 
of the Hudson at the junction of Waulkill Creek. The Deleware 
and Hudson Canal I learned terminates in the Waulkill Creek 
four miles from its mouth, and by means of the creek a connec- 
tion is formed with the Hudson River. The country on the 
western side continues abrupt, and on the east side, rather broken. 

Hyde Park on the east side, eighty miles from New York, 
is a little village the former residence of Dr. Daniel Hosack and 
is surrounded with some beautiful mansions, lawns, shady retreats 
and flower gardens, and I was informed there was also a large 
park for deer. We next passed Milton ou the west side seventy- 
two miles from New York. 

Barnegat on the east side nearly opposite Marlborough is 
almost entirely covered with lime kilns. About two miles further 
we passed the residence of George Clinton, former Governor of 
New York. It is a fine brick building situated on a projecting 
point. Passed Hamburg on the east side and came to Newburg 
on the west side sixty-two miles from New York, a town that I as- 
certained was first settled by some emigrants from Palatine about 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 225 

the year 1708. It is now a place of considerable magnitude and 
contains a population of four thousand. It is proper to remark 
the width of the river has been very uniform until now, it appears 
to be widening to double its usual width. Two miles south of 
Newburg, west side, there are two docks at a place called New 
Windsor. A few yards from the south dock is seen a low house 
with three dormer windows. In 1774 General Washington with 
his family resided in it the most of the winter, and held his 
quarters there. Polepells Island, a small round island in the 
middle of the river at this place. This island is the residence of 
nothing save snakes which are found in immense numbers. The 
mountains are beginning to come boldly to the shore on both 
sides, on the east side a high peak was pointed out that is said to 
be 1689 feet high. Breakneck Hill, in the same vicinity, 1187 
feet high. And about one mile further on the same side is Bull 
Hill, 1480 feet, a little further on the west side is Butter Hill 
1529 feet high, and a hill called the Crows Nest, in consequence 
of an indenture on its top resembling a nest, is 1418 feet high. 
These are elevations that constitute a part of the mountainous 
range called the Highlands, upon which West Point is situated 
and which is not far distant. The last elevation mentioned, that 
is the Crows Nest, is fifty-five miles from New York. It is proper 
here to remark from a comparison of the heights of these moun- 
tains, and those of Pennsylvania, that in the first part of my de- 
scription I have underrated those on the Juniatta. 

The river here is quite contracted and is confined to much 
narrower space by the massive mountains and rocks than at any 
other place that I have seen. Proceeding a little further, West 
Point, noted as being the theatre of many important events dur- 
ing the Revolution, is fully in view. It is now the seat of a mil- 
itary academy situated on the east side of the river, fift}'-one 
miles from New York. The situation is elevated and beautiful. 
The Academy and necessary buildings, the hotel, the ruins of 
old Fort Putnam, the shady walks, mountains, and gardens all 
conspire in consequence of their elevated situation to render its 
appearance to the traveler from the upper deck of the steamboat, 



226 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

picturesque and delightful, however, humiliating to my feelings 
the object is that the academy is designed to promote. 

Proceeding a few miles further we entered the Horse Race, 
so called from the swiftness of the water. The Horse Race is 
about three miles long, which we passed very rapidly and at its 
termination were within forty-two miles from New York. At 
this point the Highlands began to disappear. Through all the 
Highlands the superiority of the massive heights and rocks con- 
fined the river to a narrow space, but at this point the river begins 
to assert its superiority over the shore and is widening out. At 
thirty-eight miles from New York we pass Stony Point, known 
as the seat of a revolutionary exploit, here the river widens so 
much that it has assumed the name of Haverstraw Bay. It ap- 
pears at least three miles wide. 

At Tellers Point the river comes to its former width which 
is the termination of Haverstraw Bay, and about thirty-two miles 
from New York. After passing this point the shores recede again 
and the river becomes so wide it is called Tapan Sea. I think 
its width must be near four miles. After passing Tellers Point 
about one mile, Sing Sing was in view on the east side. A town 
in which a prison is located of the same name, the discipline and 
plan of which is like that of Auburn. Spaita on the east side, 
Nyack on the west side, Tarrytown on the east side, and Tapan 
Landing on the west side, the view of which from the middle of 
Tapan Sea is not very desirable. The most spendid sight while 
on Tapan Sea was the vast number of vessels sailing in every 
direction. After passing Tapin Landing, about one mile, the 
river is again contracted by a bluff of rocks on the west side, 
which is the southern termination of Tapan Sea. Here I learned 
that we were within twenty-four miles from New York. The 
eastern shore of Tapan Sea is densely settled and pretty well im- 
proved. 

The western shore of the sea is undulating, irregular and 
not so well settled. After passing out of Tapan Sea into the 
river with usual width, the opportunity of observing the shore 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 227 

was much more desirable. The width of the river from Tapan 
Sea to New York is more uniform. The country on the east side 
of the river is well improved and densely settled. I observed 
some elegant mansions, and a few very neat villages. The for- 
mation of country on the west side is singular. I have heretofore 
noticed its irregularity along the Tapan Sea. At the southern 
termination of the Tapan Sea it assumes the form of a solid rock; 
they call it Traprock. It varies in altitude from twenty to five 
hundred and fifty feet. It is impassable, as it presents to the river 
a smooth and almost perpendicular front. Here and there on the 
lowest places a building may be seen. This is the character of the 
western shore from Tapan Sea to within a short distance of New 
York. The increasing density of the settlements on the eastern 
shore indicates that New York City is not far distant and continues 
to increase until it mingles with the suburbs of the city. The Cit)^ 
of New York is oblong and has by far its greatest extent from 
south to north. In consequence we passed some distance along 
its western front, observed many fine buildings designed, I sup- 
pose, for wharehouses. Shipping in great numbers lined the 
wharves. At length the boat landed at about seven in the even- 
ing and we took leave of the steamboat that floated us down a 
river that is certainly noble and abounds with varied scenes that 
may be said to be picturesque and romantic. It is proper here 
to observe that this river was discovered the fourth of the ninth 
month, 1609, by Henry Hudson, whose name it bears. 

Leaving the wharf we went up Barclay street to its intersec- 
tion with Broadway, some distance to a hotel styled the Mansion 
House, but it was full, and we learned that all the places of enter- 
tainment in the city were full also. In consequence we were 
obliged to ask accommodations in a boarding-house, which after 
considerable inquiry we were enabled to obtain. The city at 
this time we learned was filled to overflowing with strangers. 
Southern merchants and persons of leisure leave the South at 
this time of the year with the view of avoiding the influence of 
a southern sun, and spend their time northwardly. It is the sea- 



223 Genealogy of the Co cites Family. 

son too, that merchants from the remote parts of the south and 
west make purchases. About this time the traveling world is in 
motion, hence the cause of the great mass of strangers. 

Of the interior of New York and its inhabitants, I know 
but little, as we passed along. Broadway, is a very wide and 
finely ornamented street. It is to New York, I presume, what 
Chestnut street is to Philadelphia — the seat of fashion, folly, life 
and animation of the kind. Observed a great many large and 
elegant buildings and fancy stores, illuminated with gaslights in 
a very tasteful manner. It is a great commercial city, and I 
learned that its population is varied, much more so than most 
cities in this country. Persons can be found from the lowest 
state of poverty to the highest state of affluence and luxury; per- 
sons of all distinctions, nations and tongues. Being a city of the 
greatest commercial importance of any in the country, induces a 
greater and more varied mass of foreigners to centre here, than 
at any other place. A traveler passing down the Hudson in a 
steamboat and passing through two of the principal streets of 
the city, and leaving again by steamboat for Philadelphia will be 
more forcibly struck with the commercial ability of the place 
than anything else. 

The city is oblong, situated on Manhattan Island, about 
fifteen miles long from north to south and one and a half miles in 
width. The city commenced on the southern point of the island, 
hence it is accessible for shipping on three sides, on the west side 
by the North River, on the east side by the East River and on 
the south side by New York Bay. The settlement of the sight 
now occupied by New York, was first commenced by the Dutch 
in the year 1615. On the morning of the 19th, we left New 
York by steamboat for Philadelphia. We went on board the 
Swan about six in the morning, at pier No. 1, on North River. 
The boat soon moved off and we found ourselves floating on the 
broad and extensive bay of New York. As the boat was pro- 
pelled along we had another fine view of the vast shipping that 
lined the borders of the city all around, and its elevated buildings 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 229 

and lofty spires. The bay is so extensive that after we proceeded 
four or five miles it appeared like getting out into the ocean. 

The state of New Jersey forms the western boundary of the 
bay and Long Island the eastern. Before leaving New York Bay 
the Narrows that lead to the ocean were fully in view, the Nar- 
rows are about one-half a mile wide and form a communication 
between Long and Staten Islands. When we were opposite the 
Narrows there was nothing to obstruct the view but the immense 
and broad surface of the waters of the Atlantic. Leaving New 
York Bay we entered Staten Island Inlet and had Staten Island 
on the left, and New Jersey on the right all the way to Amboy, 
except where we passed Newark Bay, a considerable body of 
water, that projects into the state of New Jersey. The inlet 
generally is but a few hundred yards wide. In some places we 
passed close by the shore of the island. 

The island is densely settled and very well improved; ob- 
served some beautiful mansions and elegant gardens. Distance 
from New York to Amboy thirty miles. Amboy is situated at 
mouth of Raritan River. It is an ancient looking little town, and 
possesses nothing commanding. At Amboy a locomotive engine 
and cars were in readiness when we arrived to whirl us across 
New Jersey on the Amboy and Bordentown Railway. The dis- 
tance from Amboy to Bordentown is thirty-five miles. 

We were transported at a rapid rate, saw no kind of improve- 
ment, agricultural or otherwise, in passing over the eastern part 
of New Jersey worthy of admiration. The soil is sandy and ster- 
ile. As we approached the western part of the state the soil 
became something better, and there was a visible improvement in 
the appearance of the buildings, fields, &c. 

Within a short distance of the Delaware we passed the seat 
and residence of the Ex-King of Spain, Joseph Bonaparte. It is 
quite picturesque, being surrounded with lawns, shady groves, 
gardens and everything calculated to render it a delightful re- 
treat. The railroad approaches close to the margin of the Dela- 
ware River. We stepped from the cars on board a steamboat 



230 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

that was waiting to float us on the water of the Deleware to Phil- 
adelphia. As we departed from the shore, Bordentown, a neat 
village was fully in view. After proceeding ten miles we touched 
at Bristol, a very handsome town situated on the west side of the 
river. The ground on which the town is slopes very handsomely 
towards the river. The streets appeared to be neat and shady; 
buildings good, with handsome gardens. Nearby is Burlington, 
a handsome town, distinguished for its schools and academies. 
Both sides of the river is well-improved, particularly on the west- 
ern side. Each appears to be pretty well adapted to the perfor- 
ance of what nature designed. The Pennsylvania side to the 
production of wheat and corn, and the Jersey side to the produc- 
tion of fruits, melons and potatoes. As we approach the vicinity 
of the city I observe some handsome country seats on the Penn- 
sylvania side, surrounded with fertile and well cultivated fields. 
Passed Kensington, and Northern Liberties; had an excellent 
view of the shipping and the business, and also the Delaware front 
of the city and Liberties, and arrived at the Chestnut Street 
wharf about 2 o'clock P. M. We tarried with our friend James 
Wood the remainder of the da}' and on the 20th, set out for home 
by the Norristown Railroad, which we were favored and pleased 
to reach about 12 o'clock having been absent thirty-four days, 
and traveled about twelve hundred and twenty miles. 

Sarah W. Pennepacker. 



MEMOIR. 

CONCERNING SARAH W. PENNYPACKER. 

Under I trust the humbling sense, which the closing scene 
of the departed solemnly impresses us with, I feel engaged to 
transmit the following, trusting it may be a source of encourage- 
ment to those, who are still sojourning to that '' 'bourne from 
whence no traveler returns." 

She was the daughter of Thomas and Rachel Coates (mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends) and was born in Schuylkill Town- 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 231 

ship, Chester County, on the 2nd day of 9th month, 1791. At 
the age of four years she was deprived by death of a kind mother, 
and afterwards spent the greater portion of her minority amongst 
her affectionate relatives. In more advanced life her sympathies 
and genius led her to commence business, which enabled her to 
make smooth and easy the declining years of an afflicted father. 
He expired in the year 1836. Towards him she was a dutiful 
daughter, and watched over his declining years with sympathy 
and filial tendernes. In the Autumn of 1S31, she was married 
to Elijah F. Pennypacker, and often, during the happy interval 
of our union, in the bonds I believe of true affection, did she re- 
cur with feelings of joy and satisfaction, to her youthful associa- 
tions, peace of mind, and to the kind care bestowed upon her by 
her relatives, and some months before her close, when her mind 
was exercised, she frequently and earnestly desired she might 
obtain and feel that peace and clearness which she possessed dur- 
ing her youthful innocency. 

She was afflicted with the disease of which she died about one 
year, and it was attended generally with intense pain. And al- 
though it wore at times some flattering aspects, she seemed im- 
pressed some months before her close that it would prove fatal. 
She bore her trials with patience and Christian fortitude, and 
had, I believe, some time before her close less fear of death than 
change in the character of the disease and consequent increase of 
pain. 

The latter part of ninth month, was to her a period of deep 
trial; and I have no doubt from her manner she was exercised, 
was brought into a low and humbling sense of the adorable gifts 
and mighty workings of the Father of all mercies. Sometimes 
she felt the way entirely closed, and felt so much humbled as to 
suppose herself entirely unworthy. At other times a ray of hope 
appeared and she would feel a degree of peace and tranquility, and 
see her way more clear. Thus exorcised, she oft observed, "I 
believe I have avoided evil, but there is something more, we are 
required to do positive good, this is my difficulty. Our Heavenly 



232 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Father is just and merciful.' 5 By close attention to the guiclings 
and teachings and regenerating influence of the spirit of Christ 
within us, she was finally enabled, with a more clear hope to say 
in the course of tenth month, "My way is more open and I am 
favored with peace." 

She continued in this frame of mind, I have reason to be- 
lieve, with a brightening hope and increased confidence to the 
last. 

That the Kingdom of Christ is spiritual and pure, peaceful 
and nonresistant was her unshaken belief; and she was led to ex- 
press her devoted attachment to the free, spiritual and peaceful 
principles of the society of which she was a member; and her 
feelings against the unchristian practice of war and coertion, and 
in relation to the purity and righteousness of non-resistance led 
her at times to approbate that movement. Her mind was much 
exorcised on the subject of slavery. 

11th mo. 24th, she observed her husband, in relation to some 
property which she held in her own right. "I wish thee to enjoy 
it so long as thee lives, and if there should be any left, I desire 
that a portion of it should be appropriated in whatever way thee 
should deem most desirable in promoting the principles of im- 
mediate emancipation, and freeing from bondage and oppression 
the too long neglected colored race that are now toiling in chains 
in this country," and added, "this is little compared to what I 
ought to do for them, when I reflect, I have now on me some of 
the unrighteous gain of oppression." 

On the afternoon of the first day of 12th month she was vis- 
ited by her friend Emmor Kimber, who I believe, in the true 
spirit of prophecy, spoke of the trials she had passed through; 
of her approaching dissolution; told her that her faith and hope 
were built upon the Rock of Christ; that she was covered with 
the spirit and that was tranquility and peace and exorted her with 
faith and patience to hold out to the end. And added, ' 'dear Sarah, 
thy close will be easy and tranquil, like passing from one room to 
another." During this time she was as composed and tranquil 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 233 

as a lamb, and after he had concluded expressed satisfaction that 
he came, and said she felt encouraged. After friend Kimber re- 
tired she seemed more than usually interested and animated; ad- 
monished, to avoid the necessity of having to pass through the 
trials she had, and exorted her husband very affectionately to 
do his work (that is required of him) daity. She also gave ad- 
vice on the subject of prayer advising to renewed inquiry. After 
stating the disposition she desired made of her wearing apparel, 
she continued calm until about 9 o'clock, when she observed 
twice, very emphatically, "I am submissive." She retired to 
bed about the usual time, and after being there about an hour 
or more, was assisted to her arm-chair in which she expired about 
one o'clock in the morning, on the 2nd day of 12mo., 1841, very 
easily and tranquily, by which was realized her desire that her 
close might be calm and tranquil. She was interred in Friends' 
burial ground at Schuylkill on the seventh day following, the 
4th of the month, attended by a large concourse of relatives and 
friends. And I fully believe her gentle spirit now reposes within 
the pavilion of that city, whose walls are salvation and whose 
gates are praise. 

12th, mo. 9th, 1841. Elijah F. Pennepackkr. 

The impression is so strong upon my mind that I cannot feel 
easy without adding to the foregoing memoir, that the dear sub- 
ject of it was scrupulously conscientious and exact and honest in 
all her relations to life. And her feelings of exactness and right 
was not only confined to man, but embraced the whole inferior 
order of animals, often maintaining that they were given to us in 
the wisdom of a kind Providence for our rational and proper use, 
and not our abuse; that they, throughout their whole order, as 
well as man, have rights, and that man, a being of superior in- 
telligence, in the exercise of his dominion over them ought to 
award to them, in the spirit of benignity and mercy a full meas- 
ure of what so justly belongs to them. During her illness she 
was much exercised and thought in deep sympathy with suffering 
poor. Deplored the inequality that exists, as to the outward 



234 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

things of this world, exorted her husband with kindness and 
tenderness to avoid avarice, commending frugality, industry and 
economy, and as we are favored with more than is necessary for 
a comfortable subsistance in the simplicity of truth, to use it in 
relieving the wants and distresses of the poor and oppressed, and 
in aiding those benevolent, humane and Christ-like enterprises 
that aid us in living soberly, righteously and piously in this 
world, and exalt the standard of truth and righteousness. 12mo. 
18th, 1841. 

The following appeared in the "Pennsylvania Freeman" of 
12th mo. 29th, 1841: 

"Died on the 2nd hist, in Schuylkill Township, Chester 
County, Sarah W. C. Pennepacker, wife of Elijah F. Pennepack- 
er. (C was used in her name at the A. S. A. perhaps to distin- 
guish from others.') 

"To surrender a dear friend to the stern summons of death 
is always a deep melancholy, and more or less painful duty. But 
there are some cases in which this even is robbed of all its terrors, 
and both the one departing and the surviving friends can say 
'O death where is thy sting. O grave where is thy victory?' " 

Such a case was the one above recorded. One who knew 
her whilst she was living, better perhaps than any other, and 
who sat beside her bedside when she was dying remarked in a 
letter to a friend, with touching emphasis " I believe she laid 
up for herself a crown of Righteousness." 

The deceased, though always a very modest and retiring 
woman, felt a deep interest in the cause of the slave. As she 
approached her final close, which was by a slow and gradual pro- 
gress, this interest increased, and the exercises of her mind be- 
came more intense. Her testimony on the subject was strong 
and clear, and she expressed much sympathy with those who were 
laboring for the slaves* emancipation. So lively were her impres- 
sions of the wickedness of slavery, that she was uneasy under 
the clothes that covered her, because they were in part, the pro- 
duct of this system. Upon her husband, who had been for a 



Genealogy of the Coates Faintly, 235 

long time a devoted advocate of the slave, she imposed a solemn 
injunction to continue faithful to the end. She bore a very close 
testimony to the spiritual character of Christ's kingdom. The 
principles of this kingdom, she said, were peaceful and in its true 
subject non-resistant. Her belief in the doctrines of the society 
to which she belonged particularly those relating to the unright- 
ness of war and violence, was strong and confident, and she was 
sometimes led to express her sympathy with those who were 
laboring to promote on earth the principles of peace and non- 
resistance. This was the spirit of much of her life, and these 
were her dying exercises. Death to her had no sting, and the 
grave had no victory. She approached her close with calmness 
and peace, and to all around she seemed "to die the death of the 
righteous.' ' May her surviving friends catch her spirit, and 
hearken to the voice of her dying testimonies, and may their 
"last end" be like hers. 



PART FIVE. 



Generations of Elizabeth Coates, Fourth Child, and only 
Daughter of Moses and Susanna Coates, 

B 4. Elizabeth Coates (Moses). 

At our Monthly Meeting of Bradford, held in Cain, the 18th 
day of 6 mo., 1743, John Mendenhall requests a Certificate to 
North Wales Monthly Meeting in order to proceed in marriage 
with Elizabeth, daughter of Moses Coates. 

31st of 6 mo., 1743, John Mendenhall and Elizabeth Coates 
declare their intentions of marriage. 

John Mendenhall received a Certificate to North Wales to 
marry Elizabeth Coates, 7 mo. 15th, 1743. 

27th of 7 mo., 1743, John Mendenhall and Elizabeth are at 
liberty to proceed in marriage. 

8 mo., 1743, Marriage of John Mendenhall and Elizabeth 
Coates reported as accomplished. 

31st of 5 mo., 1744, A Certificate for Elizabeth Mendenhall 
(late Coates) to Bradford Mo. Mtg. , was granted and signed at 
this time.* Their children: 

C. i. Moses Mendenhall, b. 12, 23, t744- M:— Sarah Howell. Chil- 
dren: D. 1. Aaron. 2. Jonathan. Moses married second 
time— C. Hoopes. No issue. 

2. John, b. 11, 26, 1746; d. 5, 13, 1770- 

3. Susanna, b. 7, 9, 1749; d. 9, 1772. M:— Zachariah Stanley. 

4. Samuel, b. 4, 21, 1753; d. 5, 16, 1770. 

5. Priscilla, b. 17, 1756; d. 5, 23, 177°. 

6. Elizabeth, b. 3, 24, 1759; d. 5, 26, 1819. 

B 4. C 6. Euzabkth Mhndknhali, (Elizabeth, Moses) M: 
Nicholas Robinson, 10, 10, 1776. N. was born in Pa., 1741; 
*From Bradford and North Wales M. M. records. 

236 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 237 

died 10, 21, 1826. interred at New Providence, Mont. Co., Pa. 
Aged 85 years. Their children: 

D. i. William, b. io, io, 1777; d. 9, io, 1869, in Ohio. Buried at Mf 
Pleasant, Ohio. 

2. Elizabeth, b. 12, 25, 1778; d. 5, 26, 1819. 

3. John, b. 3, 1780; d. 7, 8, 1855. 

4. Anna, b. 1783; d. 12, 31, 1806. 

5. Rachel, b. 1786; d. 3, 8, 1840. 

6. Samaria, b. 1787; d. 10, 25, 1813. 

7. Priscilla, b. 1790; d. 10, 23, 1836. 

8. Mary, b. 10, 15, 1793; d - 2 - J 9> lg 66. 

9. Hannah, b. 1, 3, 1795; d. 1870. 

10. Jonathan, b. 12, 23, 1797; d. 3, 1, 1827. 

11. Letitia, b. 9, 15, 1800; d. 1871. 



Emerson, O., July, 30, 1904. 
Truman Coates, M.D. 

Respected Friend and Relative: — My grandfather, Wm. Rob- 
inson, came to this country in 1815. The country then a wilder- 
ness. He said he wanted rich soil, plenty of timber or fuel and 
water, here he found the desires of his heart, though he started 
with the intention of going to settle near Cincinnati, or Miami 
Valley, but this location contained all he wished. He obtained 
part of his land from the Government— which is still in our 
family. All he owned we retain in the family, and the house 
(brick) he built in 1829, is now undergoing thorough repairs 
and improvements. It is situated in one of the most beautiful 
locations in the vicinity. 

Very respectfully, 

Wm. R. Clark. 



B 4. C 1. D 1. Aaron Mendenhali, (Moses, Elizabeth, 
Moses) M: — L,ydia Richardson their children: 

E. 1. John. 2. Moses. 3. Cyrus. 4. George, M.D. Is practicing 
medicine in Cincinnatti, Ohio, (1904) M: — Elizabeth S. Maule- 
Their children: F. 1. Charles. 2. Laurence. 3. Emma. M : 
Anderson. Is a widow, and lives in or near Cincinnatti, O. 



238 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

B 4. C 1. D 2. Jonathan Mendenhali, (Moses, Elizabeth, 
Moses) M: — Lydia Townsend. Their children: 

E. i. Jesse. 

2. Harrison. M: — One daughter. Harrison Mendenhall is de- 

ceased, and his daughter and widow reside in New Brigton, 
Pa. Daughter M: — Wade. 

3. Anna, M: — D. Barry. 

4. May, UNM. 

B 4. C 5. Elizabeth Mendenhali,. (Moses, Elizabeth) 
M: — Nicholas Robinson. (Thomas; Rachel) Nicholas b. 1741, 
in Pa. d. 1826, at New Providence, Montgomery Co., Pa., aged 
85 years. His niece, Hannah (Robinson) Bear, writes that she 
remembers him as a very old and feeble man whom she ever saw 
propped up with pillows, in a large chair. They lived at the old 
homestead, inherited from his father, which was afterward oc- 
cupied by their daughters — "the old maid Robinsons. M I think 
they were not strictly Quakers, at least the daughters were not. 
These daughters lived to old age, and were interesting women. 
They were exceptionally clever with needle and pencil, and some 
of them could turn off an appropriate rhyme upon occasion. 
With the advantage of the present day they would have been 
noted. One of their pieces was an illustratson of little "Barbara 
Ivithwaite, ' ' Wardsworth's heroine. It was real tapestry work, 
evolved out of their own inner conscienciousness. An old Wedge- 
wood bowl, descended from the Robinson's, is decorated with 
Barbara Laithwaite and her lamb. Possibly they copied it. 
The bowl is in my possession, the needlework in Ohio, in posses- 
sion of a niece, Samaria Clark, Emerson, P. O. (P. W. S.) 
They were old women when I saw them, years ago, and to my 
youthful mind, very amazing on account of their idiosyncrasies. 
They had a farmer and his family who worked for them. 

On the death of the last member of the family, it was found 
that these people had come in for a good share of the property, 
and they were suspected of helping themselves to much house- 
hold stuff in the way of silver, &c. A law suit resulted. Of the 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 239 

eleven children, only two, — William and John, married, and 
their descendents are in the middle West, as will be seen later. 

Wm, R. Clark, Emerson, Ohio. 
B 4. C 6. D 1. William Robinson (Moses, Elizabeth, 
Moses) M: — Hannah Jacobs, in 1806. Their children: 
E. i. Hannah J., b. n, i, 1807; d. 3, 1890. 
2. Lydia, died in infancy. 

Hannah J. Robinson M: — Peter Streeper, of Barren Hill 
Mont. Co., Pa. Their children: F. 1. Rachel R., b. 1841; 
M:— Samuel Schroyer. No children. 2. Anna Elizabeth 
b. io, 16, 1845; d. 1864. Hannah (Jacobs) Coates died, when 
in 1812, William Robinson M:— Jane Evans, b. 1784; d. 1876. 
Buried at Gwynedd F.B.G. Their children: E. 2-1. Eliza- 
beth, b 2, 1, 1S15; d. 12, 1847. 2-2. Tacy, 2-3. Samaria, twins, 
b. 1818. d. 10, 23, 1905, at Emerson, Ohio. Tacy, d. 6, 12, 1887. 

B 4. C 6. D 3. John Robinson (Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) 
M:— Elizabeth Childs. Their children: 

E. 1. James, b. 9, 1815; d. 1875. 

2. Samaria, b. 10, 1813. Res. in Mont. Co,, Pa. 

B 4. C 6. D 3. E 2. Samaria Robinson (John, Elizabeth, 
Elizabeth, Moses) M: — Joseph Righter. Their children: 

F. 1. John, d. UNM. 

2. Anne, d. UNM. 

3. Benjamin, d. 1877. 

4. William, d. 1858, UNM. 

B 4. C 6. D 3. E 2. F 3. Benjamin Righter (Samaria, John, 
Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) M: — Mattie Hanks. Their child: 

G. 1. Guy A., b. 1S76. Res., Decatur, 111. 

Following is a list of deaths sent me by William R. Clark, 
of Emerson, Ohio: 

Anna Robinson, d. Dec. 31, 1806; Samaria Robinson, d. Oct. 25, 1813J 
Elizabeth Robinson, d. May 26, 1819; Nicholas Robinson, d. Oct. 21, 1826; 
Jonathan Robinson, d. Mar. i, 1827; Priscilla Robinson, d. Oct. 23, 1836; 
Rachel Robinson, d. Mar. 8, 1840; John Robinson, d. July 8, 1855; Elizabeth 
Robinson, d. Apr. 16, 1865; Mary Robinson, d. Feb. 19, 1S66. 

B 4. C 6. D 1. E 2-3. Samaria I. Robinson (William, Eliza- 
beth, Elizabeth, Moses) M:— George P. Clark, 10 mo., 1840. 
Res., Emerson P.O., Ohio. Their children: 



240 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

F. i. Charles B., b. 12, 1841; d. 10, 1846. 

2. William Robinson, b. 7, 15, 1843. 

3. Theodore, b. 9, 1, 1845. 

4. Frances, b. 9, 1848; d. 3, 1849. 

5. Elizabeth J , b. 2, 28, 1850. 

6. Tacy Ella, b. 12, 1851; d. io, 24, 1881. 

7. Mary Alice, b. 9, 16, 1854. 

8. Laura, d. 8, 22, 1803 ( f *„„ u ^ „ , Q ^ 

9. George M. *> f twins, b. io, 29, 1857. 

10. Robert, b. 7, 1861; d. 1, 1862. 
B 4. C 6. D 1. E 2-3. F 2. William Robinson Clark 
(Samaria, William, Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) M: — Margaret 
Craft, 10, 1876. P.O., Emerson, Ohio. Their child: 

G. 1. Frank W., b. 7, 13, 1879. 

B 4. C 6. D 1. E 2-3 F 3. Theodore Clark (Samaria, Will- 
iam, Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) M: — Laura Berry, dau. of 
Reece and Julia Berry. Married 5, 1878. Children: 

G. 1. Horace, b. 5, 7, 1879. 

2. Mabel, b. 3, 1SS1. 

3. Florence, b. 2, 21, 1884. 

4. Leona, b. 10, 1889. 

B 4. C 6. D 1. E 2-3. F 7. Mary Alice Clark (Samaria, 
William, Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) M: — El wood Walker, son 
of Jeremiah and Ruth Walker, 10, 14, 1880. Children: 

G. 1. Ernest R., b. 3, 8, 1883. 
2. Irene, b. 5, 12, 1888. 

B 4. C 6. D 1. E 2-3. F 9. George M. Clark (Samaria, 
William, Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Moses) M: — Amelia Hicks, dau. 
of Stephen and Hannah Hicks, 11, 19, 1891. Their children: 
G. 1. Tacie Ella, b. 1, 11, 1893. 

2. Stephen Hicks, b. 2, 1894; d. 7, 1894. Res., East Williston, Long 
Island, N. Y. (1904). 



PART SIX. 



Generation of William Co ate f, Fifth Son of Moses and 
Susanna Coates. 

B 5. William Coatks. Is reported to have died single and 
unmarried. 

We may infer that William was not a small child at the time 
of his death, as from the verses written by a great-grand son, 
Moses Robinson, he speaks of the ''seven stout sons" of Moses 
and Susunna Coates. 

241 



PART SEVEN. 



Generation of Jonathan Coates, Sixth son of Moses and 
Susanna Coates. 

B 6. Jonathan Coates, (Moses) was born in New Provi" 
dence, Philadelphia County, Pa. 11, 1728. 

Gwynedd M. Mtg., Records. 

25th of 3 1755. Application made for a Certificate for Jon- 
athan Coates to proceek in marriage with a young woman be- 
longing to Abbington Mo. Mtg. 

25th, of 3, 1755. Certificate granted to Jonathan Coates. 

25th, of 10, 1755. A certificate was received for Jane Coates 
from Abbington Mo. Mtg. Jane (Longstreth) Coates, wife of 
Jonathan Coates, was born 11, 23, 1735, died 5, 16, 1795, fifth 
child of Bartholomew and Jane Longstreth, and was born in 
Warminster, Bucks Co., Pa. They were married 4, 22, 1755. 

30th, of 8th mo. 1757. A certificate granted for Jonathan 
Coates and wife to Goshen Mo. Mtg. (From Bradford M. Mtg.) 
Their children: 

C. i. Ann, b. 5, 12, 1757. M:— Zebulan Withers, of Bait, Md., 11, 16 
1796. 

2. James, b. 7, 22, 1859. 

3. Hannah, b. 7, 5, 1761; d. 11, 28, 1843, UNM. 

4. Jonathan, Jr., b. 5, 28, 1764; d. io, i, 1793, UNM. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 7, 18, 1783, Jonathan Coates 
Jr., Cert, requested to Kennett, signed 1, 16, 1784. 

5. Susanna. 6. Phebe, twins b. 7, 23, 1766. Phebe, d. 1843. Mi- 

Richard Price. They were disowned by Bait. M. Mtg., 7, 8, 
1802. 
7. Kezia, b. 2, 24, 1769. M:— William Hayard, Jr. A Certificate 
was granted 16th of 6th mo., 1791 from Indian Springs M. M. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 243 

8. Grace, b. 7, 16, 1771, d. 3, 24, 1844. M:— Knox. They resided 

in Bait, Md. 

At Baltimore M. M., held 9th of 1st mo., 1800: Women's 
Meeting bring a complaint against Grace Knox, formerly Coates* 
for having her marriage accomplished contrary to the rules of 
discipline. Grace makes an acknowledgement 8th of 5th mo., 
i8co andjis retained. 

9. Isaac, b. 2, 8, 1774; d. UNM. 
10. Jane, b. 8, 28, 1776; d. UNM. 

ii. Elizabeth, b. 9, 8, 1779. M: — Amos West, of Baltimore, Md., 4, 
25, 1802, at Baltimore M. M. 

From Records of Uwchlan Monthly Meeting, Chester Co. , 
Pa. Jonathan Coates, for himself, Jane, his wife, and four chil- 
dren, Grace, Isaac, Jane and Elizabeth, dated 11th mo. last, and 
likewise Hannah and Susannah Coates produced a Certificate 
from the same place dated 14th of 5th mo. last which were read 
and received. 

At Gunpowder Meeting held 29th of 5th mo., 1790. Ann 
Coates produced a certificate for herself to this Meeting from 
Bradford Monthly Meeting in Penna., dated 14th of 5th mo., 
1790, and Kesiah Coates produced one for herself from Kennett 
M. M., in Pa., dated 15th, of 4th mo., 1790, which were read 
and received. 

At Gunpowder M. M., held 30th, of 4th mo. 1791. William 
Hayward and Kesiah Coates appeared here and declared their 
intentions of marriage with each other, parents consent being 
had, and the man is desired to produce a certificate at next meet- 
ing from his. Their second intention was declared 28th of 5th 
mo. 1791. The marriage reported at meeting held 25th of 6th 
mo., 1791. 

At Fairfax M. Mtg. , held 25th of 1st mo. , 1795. Ann Coates 
produced a certificate from Baltimore Monthly Meeting dated 
8 month last which was read and accepted. 

At Fairfax M. Mtg., held 24th of 4th mo., 1802. A certifi- 
cate for Aquilla Coates, dated at Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, 
Penn., 29th of 1st mo., 1799, was produced here. It appears 



244 Genealogy of the Coates Fa?nily. 

that he resided within the verge of Hopewell Monthly Meeting, 
and it is judged right to transfer his right there. 

At Indian Springs M. Mtg., held 5th of 4th month 1791. 
(Indian Springs M. Mtg., was in Anna Arundle Co., Md. Elk 
Ridge particular meeting was in Ellicot City, Howard Co., Md.) 
Elk Ridge informs that William Hay ward, Jr., requests a certifi- 
cate to Gunpowder Meeting, for marriage with Keziah Coates. 
This certificate was granted 17th of 6th mo., 1791. 

At Gunpowder Monthly Meeting held 25th of 7th mo., 1789. 
Jonathan Coates produced a certificate from Kennett Monthly 
Meeting, Pa. (Taken from Baltimore Monthly Meeting mar- 
riages) . 

At the establishing of Baltimore Monthly Meeting for the 
Western District, 8th of 10th month 1807, Hannah Coates, Jane 
Coates, and Ann Coates are mentioned as young women. 

Note, from 1807 to 1819 Baltimore had two Monthly Meet- 
ings. 

At Baltimore Monthly Meeting for the Western District held 
7th of 3rd month, 1810. A certificate was produced from Indian 
Spring Monthly Meeting for Ann Coates, dated 6th of last month. 

Taken from extracts from York Monthly Meeting, York 
Co., Pa. Samuel Coates certificate to Bradford Monthly Meeting 
10th mo, 6th, 1790. Hannah Coates, certificate from Bradford 
dated 2nd mo., 18th, 1791, received 3 mo., 9th. Hannah Coates 
certificate to Bradford, 4th mo., 9th, 1794. Rachel Coates cer- 
tificate from Bradford 6th mo. 12th, 1795. Elizabeth Coates, 
daughter of Aaron Coates, deceased, and Mary Coates, and John 
Worley, of York, son of Jacob and Ann Worley. 



PART EIGHT. 



Generation of Aaron Coates y Seventh child of Moses and 
Susanna Coates, 

From Gwynedd M. Mtg., Records: 26th of 9th mo., 1752. 
Aaron Coates and Rachel Eastburn declare their intentions of 
marriage. 

31st of 10th mo., 1752. Aaron Coates and Rachel Eastburn 
are at liberty to proceed in marriage. 

11th mo., 1752. Marriage of Aaron Coates and Rachel 
Eastburn reported as accomplished. 

25th of 5 mo., 1756. Application being made for a certifi- 
cate for Aaron Coates and wife, Jonathan Coates and wife and 
Benjamin Coates to Goshen Monthly Meeting, wherefore we ap- 
point six friends to be a committee to treat with said friends and 
Goshen and Pikeland friends and endeavor to find whether the 
latter are willing to join with them in holding a Meeting. 

27th of 7th mo. , 1756. Certificates granted for Aaron Coates 
and wife and Benjamin Coates to Goshen Mo. Mtg. 

Goshen M. Mtg. Certificates received 1721-1757. 

Certificates from Gwynedd Monthly Meeting for Aaron 
Coates and Rachel, his wife. 

B 7. Aaron Coates (Moses) M: — Rachel Eastburn. Chil- 
dren: 

C. i. Benjamin. M:— Mary Ballance, io, 13, 1763. (Bait. Records). 

2. Beulah. ' M:— James Guin. He died, when Beulah married 

George Foster. 

3. Grace, M:— George Litzenburg. Children: D. 1. Mary Ann 

2. Jacob. 3. Isaac. 

4. Aaron. M:— Children: D. I.Elizabeth. M:— John Worley, 

245 



246 Genealogy of the Coates Faintly. 

of York, Pa. 2. Moses. M: — Catherine Howe. 3. Sidney. 
4. Rachel. The whole family moved to western part of Penna. 
in 1814. 

5. Samuel. M: — Rebecca Brooke. Their children: E. 1. Isaac, 

2. John. Both born about 1806. Samuel and Rebecca went 
west. 

6. John. M:— Deidomia Griffith. They had one child: F. 1. 

Elizabeth, b. 12, 1796, at Norristown, Pa. 

Aaron Coates of Bradford M. Mtg., moved to Warrington, 
York Co., Pa., settlement about 1767. 

Among the Friends of the Carolina's and Georgia are 
Coateses. Moved about 1760. Supposed to be from Warrington, 
Pa. 

From Radnor Monthly Meeting Records: 2 mo. 8th, 1765. 
Aaron Coates produced a certificate for self, wife and children, — 
Benjamin, Beulah, Grace and Aaron, from Uwchlan, dated 10 
mo., 4th, 1764. 

7 mo. 9th, 1776. Benjamin Coates hath taken up arms and 
is gone away, and was therefore disowned. 

3 mo. 11th, 1779. Rachel Coates and two children, Samuel 
and John, requested a certificate of removal to Philadelphia. 

12 mo. 9th, 1779. Samuel Coates had a certificate of re- 
moval to Gwynedd Meeting. 

Taken from Redstone Monthly Meeting Records in Fayette 
County, Pa., established 1793: 

At Redstone Monthly M. held the 2nd of 12th month, 1814. 
A certificate was produced for Sidney Coates, from York Monthly 
Meeting, dated the 7th of 9th month last, which was read and 
accepted. 

Mary Coates, certificate to Redstone (Fayette Co., Penn.) 
9 mo. 7, 1814. 

At Redstone Monthly Meeting held the 1st of 9th month, 
1815. Women Friends produced a certificate for Rachel Coates, 
from York Monthly Meeting dated the 7th of 6th month last, 
which was read and accepted. 



Genealogy of the Co ate s Family. 247 

At Redstone Monthly Meeting held 18th of 7th month 1815. 
A certificate was produced to this Meeting for Mary Ann Coates, 
from York Monthly Meeting, dated the 7th of 6th mouth last, 
which was read and accepted. 



9th mo., 27th, 1857. 
Esteemed Friknd: 

In reply to thy request I fully comply. Thee is correct as 
to the death of Aaron and Samuel Coates, they were both buried 
at York, but as to the year of their death I know nothing, the 
time might be ascertained from the records of York Monthly 
Meeting. Jonathan Jessop is the most prominent Friend now 
living there. We will now survey children of uucle Aaron's 
family, viz: 

Elizabeth, Moses, Sidney and Rachel, they all remained at 
York a number of years after the death of their father, say until 
eighteen hundred eight or nine, when Elizabeth married John 
Worley, a member of York M. Meeting. They remained thus 
situated five or six years, with the addition of five children to 
wit: Mary Ann, Jacob, Caleb, Asa, Eli. 

Two or three years after Elizabeth married Moses followed 
in course, and married a girl whose name was Catherine Howe, 
an orphan, by whom he had three children: Mary Ann, Jacob 
and Isaac. 

After Elizabeth and John Worley married, they went to 
housekeeping with Sidney, as help, two miles in the country. 
Thus leaving their aunt Mary and Rachel in a comfortable home 
and lot in town, where they spent 5 or 6 years in their several 
localities. 

In the meantime Moses married (as above stated) and lived 
with his mother in York until the year 1813, when it was con- 
cluded between John Worley and thy aunt Mary to remove the 
entire family to western Penna., which they did in the spring of 
1814. Mary sold her house and lot which enabled her to make a 
small investment for Moses J. Whorley who purchased quite a good 



248 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

farm about three miles below Brownsville, iu Fayette Co., Pa., 
here they put up a small house for Moses. Their mother and 
two daughters homed with John and Elizabeth for about 2 years, 
when the former was prostrated with rheumatism, which closed 
the conflict with time, for the happy mansions of the redeemed 
of all generations. This took place the second year after their 
leaving York. The next death that followed was John Worley; 
then followed that of their daughter Mary Ann, who lived to 
grow up, but left no issue; then followed the death of Moses' 
wife, without having any more issue than these above named. 
Of the three latter I can give no date, as I had left that neighbor- 
hood before they took place. 

My last interview with any of the family was in 1849. I 
spent a few days in Brownsville, and made a special call on Eliz- 
abeth Whorley, after a lapse of thirty years. I found her and 
two sisters the only occupants of the farm, except her son-in-law 
who had remained as a tenant after the death of his wife, and 
the proceeds of the farm afforded them a comfortable living. He 
was laying prostrate at that time, not able to attend to any bus- 
iness. 

Every dispensation seems to have a tendency to try the faith 
of Elizabeth who is now left without a child to lean upon, her 
two eldest sons having married. The children were all living in 
the same neighborhood, but none with their mother. I did not 
see any of thy uncles family except Elizabeth, Sidney and Rachel, 
and the foregoing is about the substance as near as I can recol- 
lect. Moses Coates was living with his daughter in the same 
neighborhood at the time. 

We will now revert to thy uncle Caleb Kirk, who married 
Lydia Updegraff , daughter of Samuel, by whom there were seven 
sons, Samuel Agustus, Elmer, Erastus, Aquilla, Josiah, Eli, and 
Henry Kirk. All of whom lived to grow up, and all moved to 
Ohio, except Josiah and Eli who went to Philadelphia and there 
married. The names of the twin sisters I know not, or if there 
was any issue. The other sons married in Ohio except Erastus 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 249 

and Aquilla, the former married Maria Mathews, (of Gunpowder) 
who died and left one son Charles, a little after her marriage. 
Aquilla married Sarah Needles, of Baltimore, by whom there 
were five daughters, whom I cannot correctly name, and two 
sons, Edward and Charles. After they all settled in Ohio Samuel 
A. Kirk married Iyisanna Worell, and Elmer married Edith Up- 
degraff, neither had any children. 

Henry Kirk married Margaret Marsh who had six or seven 
children, but their names I do not know. They all lived in Ohio. 
Aquilla has had several of his children to many, and all moved 
to the state of Illinois, which closes my reference to them. Caleb 
Kirk died near Smithfield, the latter part of 1836, and his wife 
a little more than a year after. 

As respects thy niicle EH, his death took place, as near as I 
can recollect, in 1796, he left a widow with 5 children to wit: 
Joseph, Nathan, Elisha, Beulah, and Susan, who lived to grow 
up, and as they came of age, and there married as herein stated. 
Nathan, to Amelia Townsend. lie soon after moved to the lower 
part of Indiana, where his wife died and left 7 or 8 children 
whose names I know not. Nathan married a second time, of 
this I have no doubt, but of his subsequent death, we only infer, 
from not hearing from any of his family for these 20 years. 
Elisha had three wives, the first, Deborah Harrison, who died 
within a year after, the second, Rachel Folk, by whom there 
were two sons and a daughter, Jesse, Elisha, and Sarah, and 
their mother died. The third and last wife, Christianna Hall, 
with whom he left a sou and a daughter. Nathan and Rachel, 
and last of all. Elizabeth died, which occurred since I left in 
1849, say in 1853 or 4. Next in course of marriage was Susanna 
who married John N. Marsh, who left her a widow without issue, 
also since I left. 

Beulah married Isaac Garretson. Their children were, 
Eliza, Emile, David and EH. Their mother was also called home 
by a painful close and left them all minors. Joseph comes next 
in course of time, his choice was Rachel Garretson, by whom he 



250 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

left 5 children, viz: Sarah, Maria, Therissa, John and William. 
I was with their father at the close, it was an agonizing one. 
Susan is now living a widow, she homes with her brother Elisha's 
children near Mount Pleasant, Ohio. As respects to my dear 
Edith, I may add we married in 1807. Her children were all in 
attendance at her funeral, except Nathan who was settled in In- 
diana. And now in conclusion may I add, where names and 
dates are in the foregoing, I have no knowledge of them. Of 
later years I have become so nervous that my writing would be 
unintelligible to a stranger and therefore have to beg the aid of 
an amanuensis to make a transcript from my rough sketch on a 
slate, which is rather a tedious process, I am glad to give my 
mite in furtherance of thy plan. 

Thy affectionate friend, Timothy Kirk. 

To Caleb Coates, Phila., Pa. 



East Goshen County, 6 mo., 24, 1857. 
Respected Friend: 

I received a letter from thee some time ago, requesting of 
me such information as I could give in relation to the Coates 
family from the records of Goshen Monthly Meeting. Upon ex- 
amination I find that Aaron Coates and wife Rachel, and Benjamin 
Coates, came to Goshen with their certificates from Gwynedd 
Monthly Meeting, dated 9th mo., 1856. 

Jonathan Coates and wife Jane, came in Slh mo., 1857, from 
the same place. Priscilla Coates I find no record of. 

In the 9th month of the same year that Benjamin came to 
Goshen he married with Ann Longstreth, of Bucks County. 

In the year 1763 Goshen Meeting was divided and Uwchland 
Monthly Meeting was settled, and I think they must have been 
within the limits of that Meeting as I find nothing concerning of 
them after that time. 

Respectfully, Jonathan Cope. 

To Caleb Coates, Phila. 

N. B. It appears that Benjamin was more appointed on 
ommittees in the Monthly Meetings than the others. 



PART NINE. 



Generation of Benjamin Coates^ Eighth Child of Moses and 
Susanna Coates. 

B 8. Benjamin Coates. (Moses). M: — Ann Longsteth, 
9, 22, 1756, at Charlestown, under care of Goshen M. Mtg. of 
Friends. Ann dau. of Bartholomew, of Warminster, Bucks Co., 
Pa. born 11, 3, 1737, died 6, 26, 1824. Both she and her husband 
buried at Pikeland F. B. G. 

Certificate from Gwynedd M. Mtg., for Benjamin Coates, 
clear of all marriage engagements except with Ann Longstreth. 
Their children: — 

C i. William, b. 1758, d. 10, 18, 1834, interred at E. Cain. 

2. Jane, b. 1760. M:— Alexander Stewart. 

3. Sarah, b. 1762. M: — Israel Worrell. 

4. Elizabeth, b. 1764. M: — Eliuhim Anderson. 

5. Ann, b. 1766, d. UNM. 

6. Abner, b. 1768, d. 10, 17, 1820, in Springfield, Ind. M: — Marg- 

aret Tussy. 

7. Susanna, b. 3, 10, 1770; d. 1772. 

8. Tacy, b. 1772; d. 7, 2, 1851, UNM. 

9. Rachel, b. 1779; d. 9, 16, 1858. 

10. Benjamin, b. 9, 18, 1780; d. 10, 25, 1820, in Springfield, Ohio. 

Goshen M. M. marriages, from 1732 to 1787: Benjamin 
Coates, the son of Moses Coates of Charlestown in the County of 
Chester in the Province of Pennsylvannia, and Ann Longstreth, 
dau., of Bartholomew, in the County and Province aforesaid * 
* * married 22d of 9 mo., 1756 at Charlestown. Witnesses: — 
Moses Coates, Ann Thompkins, Thos. Coates, Jonathan Coates, 
Jane Coates, Elizabeth Mendenhall, Elizabeth Coates, Elizabeth 

251 



252 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Longstreth, John Longstreth, Moses Coates, Junr., Rachel Coates, 
Isaac Longstreth, Joseph Longstreth, Benjamin Longstreth, &c. 

From Bradford M. Mtg. Records: 

11, 18, 1786. Abner Coates, minor, cert., from Goshen. 

8, 14, 1792. Abner Coates complained of for marrying out 
and one not a member. Disowned 3, 15, 1792 (Cain M. Mtg.) 

B 8. C 1. Wixuam Coates (Benjamin, Moses) of West 
Bradford, Chester Co., Pa: 1, 17, 1783. Wm. Coates requests 
Cert, to Goshen, signed 2, 14, 1783. M:— Rebecca Stalker. 
They resided in West Bradford Township, Chester Co., Pa. Re- 
becca died 1, 27, 1830, in her 74th year. Interred at East Cain 
F.B.G. 

1, 14, 1785. Rebecca (Stalker) Coates made acknowledge- 
ment for marrying out of Meeting (Wm. Coates). 

Bradford M. Mtg. records, 1, 18, 1782: William Coates 
Certificate from Abington dated 12, 31, 1781. 

10, 12, 1782. Makes acknowledgement for quarreling. 
Their children: 

D. i. William, died young. 2. Stalker. 3. Grace. 4. Hannah. 5. 
Reuben, died UNM. 6. Ann. 7. William. 

2, 17, 1797. Children received by request of parents. 

B 8. C 9. Rachel Coates (Benjamin, Moses) M: — Phinaes 
Fell. Their children: 

D. 1. Thomas. 2. Grace. 3. David. M:— Abbie Ann Horner. Had 
one child, killed by steam mill. 

B 8. C 10. Benjamin Coates, Jr. (Benjamin, Moses)^M: — 
Elizabeth Iveston. Children: 

D. 1. George. 2. Abner, d. 1S20. 3. Benjamin, d. 1S20. 

B8. Cl. D2. Stalker Coates (William, Benjamin, Moses) 
of West Bradford Mtg. M:— Elizabeth Williams, 10, 11, 1813. 
Their children: 

E. 1. Ezra, b. 9, S, 1S14; died in Waynesburg (now Honeybrook) 

Chester Co., Pa. 

2. Cyrus, b. 1, 1, 1S16; d. 1, 6, 1900, in Coatesville, Chester Co., Pa. 

3. Lydia, b. 10, 16, 1S17; d. 12, 16, 1891, in Upper OxfordJTownship. 

4. Milton, b. 7, 2, 1819; d. S, 6, 1831. 



Genealogy of the Coates Fa?nily. 253 

5. Phebe, b. 9, 17, 1838; died UNM. 

6. Chalkley, b. 12, 9, 1825; d. 3, 11, 1900, in Phila., Pa. Family re 

side 813 N. 26th St., Phila., Pa. (1905). 

7. William, b. 1, 27, 1828; d. 7, 24, 1852, UNM. in Highland Town- 

ship, Chester Co., Pa. 

8. John, b. 9, 10, 1829. 

9. Annie, b. 4, 28, 1832. 

From Fallowfield M. Mtg. records: 

A certificate was received from Sadsbury Monthly Meeting, 
dated 4th mo., 6th, 1836, for Stalker Coates and Elizabeth, his 
wife, and seven minor children, viz: Cyrus, Eydia, Phebe, 
Chalkley, William, John, and Ann Coates, which was read and 
accepted. Also one dated as above from the same place, from 
Ezra Coates. 

B 8. C 1. D 3. Grace Coatks (William, Benjamin, Moses) 
M: — Samuell Guthery. He died in Ercildoun, Chester Co., Pa. 
Their child: 

E. i.Albert. M— Young. Their child: F. 1. M:— Res. Malvern, Pa. 

B 8. C 1. D 4. Hannah Coatks (William, Benjamin, Moses) 
M:— William Glover, 3, 19, 1834, at East Cain, son of Thomas 
and Mary of West Chester, Pa. Hannah was from West Brad- 
ford, and died in West Chester, Pa. 

Bradford M. Mtg. Records: William Glover of the Borough 
of West Chester in the County of Chester and State of Penna., 
and son of Thomas Glover and Mary his wife, deceased, and 
Hannah Coates, daughter of William Coates, of West Bradford 
township, in the County and State aforesaid, and Rebecca his 
wife (the latter deceased), married 19th of 3 mo., 1834, at East 
Cain. Witnesses: Richard J. Worth, Eliza M. Glover, Susanna 
Mickle, Ann Coates, Ezra Coates, Sophia Glover, Ann L. Scar- 
lett, William N. Scarlett, Amelia Valentine, Septeeni Valentine, 
Rachel Ann Worth, John C. Mickle, and others. 

B 8. C 1. D 6. Ann Coates (William, Benjamin, Moses) 
M: — Alexander Walker. No children. Res., in Downington, 
Pa. 



254 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

Generation F, Children of E. 
B 8. C 1. D 2. E 1. Ezra Coates (Stalker, William, Ben- 
jamin, Moses). 

Fallowfield M. Mtg., 8th, 10th mo., 1836. Certificate for Ezra 
Coates from New Garden Monthly Meeting, dated the 7th of 7th 
mo. last. M — Susanna Sloan. Their children: 

F. i. Charles. M:— Miss Penny. 2. Elizabeth. 3. Joseph, d. young. 
After death of Susanna (Sloan) Coates, Ezra M: — Phebe Ann 
Mills: Children: 2-1. Mary B. 2-2. Clara. 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 2. Cyrus Coates (Stalker, William, Ben- 
jamin, Moses) M: — Elizabeth Fulton, dau. of James and Ann 
Pyle Fulton. Elizabeth was born 9, 23, 1822, and now resides 
at 150 Elm St., Reading, Pa. (1905). They were M:— 2, 18, 
1847. They lived on farm in Upper Oxford Twp., Chester Co., 
Pa., for years, when they moved to Ercildotm, then to Coates- 
ville, where Cyrus died. Their children: 

F. 1. Laura, b. 6, 19, 1S49; d. n, 7, 1S50. 

2. James Francis, b. 11, 1, 1851, in West Fallowfield Township, 

Chester Co., Pa. 

3. Walter Scott, b. 2, 24, 1855; d. 3, 24, 1900. Was an able mechanic 

and contractor, and from results of a fall in a building in 
Coatesville, he died. 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 3. Lydia Coates. (Stalker, William, 
Benjamin, Moses) M: — John Hambleton, son of Samuel and 
Sarah. Their son: — 

F 1, Theodore Parker. M:— Frances Epright, no children. 

B 8. CI. D2. E6. Chalklky Coatks. (Stalker, William, 
Benjamin, Moses) M: — Mary Ann Walton, dau. of Nathan and 
Eliza Truman Walton. Nathan was a Thompsonian Physician. 
Chalkley and Mary Ann were married 1, 15, 1848. Their child- 
ren: — 

F. 1. Anna Melissa, b. 9, 21, 1849; d. 11, 7, 1849. 

2. Janette Walton, 1, 28, 1S51; d. 12, 1, i860. 

3. Evangeline, b. 6, 30, 1853; d. M:— William J. Moore. Res., 

Ogontz, Pa. No children. 

4. Irene, b. 9, 9, 1855; d. 8, 16, 1S89. M:— William Wesley Trout 

Their children: G. 1. Eva Mary, b. 1878; d. 1S79. 2. Henry 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 255 

W. 3. Irene Trout. After Irene's death, William married a 
second time. Res., at Spring Lake, N.J. His daughter Irene 
is a graduate and teacher in Manual Training, from a school 
in Boston, Mass. 

5. Elizabeth, b. 11, 12, 1S58; d. 3, n» 1SS2. 

6. Ida Mary, b. io, 9, 1868, at Ercildoun, Pa. Is clerk in Friends' 

Book Store, 15th and Race Sts., Phila., Pa. (1905). 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E S. John Coatks (Stalker, William, Benja- 
min, Moses) M: — Priscilla Barnard, dan. of William and Mary 
Iy. Their children: 

F. 1. William Barnard, b. 8, 30. 1S62. 

2. Frederick. M:— Effa M. McNeil, dau. of John and Redecca 
(Lam born). 

B S. C 1. D 2. E 9. Annie Coatss. (Stalker, William, 
Benjamin, Moses) M: — Lewis Good La inborn, son of Marshall 
and Esther. Their children: — 

F. 1. Leonda C, b. S, 28, 1S59. 

2. Elnora Ellsworth, b. 2, 26, 1S61. 

3. Elizabeth R., b. 11, 10, 1864. 

4. William K., b. 2, 2, 1866; d. 4, 27, 1S95. 

5. Anna May, b. 6, 27, 1S69. 

B 8. CI. D 2. El. F2-1. MaryB. Coatks. (Ezra, Stalk- 
er, William, Benjamin, Moses) M:— John DeHaven. Their 
children: — 

G. 1. Mary, 2. Elizabeth, twins, 3. William. 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 1. F 2-2. Clara DeHaven. (Ezra, 
Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Grier Hadley, Res., 
Coatesville, Fa. (1900). Had six daughters and one son. 

B 8. CI. D 2. El. F2. James Francis Coates. (Cyrus, 
Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M:— Nellie Dailey, of Silver 
Lake, Pa., in Phila., Pa. Res. 2312 10th Ave., S., Minneapolis, 
Minn. Their children: — 

G. 1. Edgar, b. 1, 3, 187S, in Phila., Pa. 

2. Mabel E., b. 12, 3, 1879, at Silver Lake, Pa. Is a teacher and 
graduate in University in Minneapolis, Minn. 

B 8. C 1. D 2, El. F 3. Walter Scott Coates. (Cyrus, 



256 Genealogy of the Coatcs Family. 

Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Elmira Bosliong, dau., 
of John and Elizabeth. Their children: — 

G. i. J. Howard. M:— Alice B. Phleming, of Coatesville, Pa., 6, i, 
1901, where they reside (1904). 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 8. F 1. William Barnard Coates. 
(John, Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Anna Moore. 
Their children: — 

G. 1. Norman Barnard, b. 10, 5, 1892. 

2. Frederick William, b. n, 2, 1S95. 

3. Paul, b. 10, 25, 1901. 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 8. F 1. Leonda C. Lamborn. (Annie, 
Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Annie E. Crawford, 
dau. of John and Martha. Their children: — 

G. 1. Ethel, 12, 26, 1887. 

2. Benjamin, b. 8, 28, 1S92. 

3. Margarete, b. 8, 25, 1896. 

4. Anna, b. 12, 16, 1897; d. 4, 24, 1898. 

B 8. CI. D 2. B8. F 2. Elnora Ellsworth Lmmborn. 
(Annie, Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — John B. Tan- 
guy, son of Alfred and Ruth Ann. Their children: 
G. 1. Lewis Leland, b. 4, 18, 1893. 

2. Ruth Evelyn, b. 3, 16, 1903. Res., in West Grove, Chester Co., 
Pa. (1906). 

B 8. CI. D2. E8. F3. Elizabeth Lamborn. (Annie, 
Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Walter W. Maule, son 
of Comley and Susan Emma. W. W. M. died 4, 20, 1892. No 
children. Res. in Oxford, Pa. (1906). 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 8. F 4. William R. Lamborn. (Annie, 
Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — Annie Scott, dau. of 
Franklin and Rachel, of Coleraine Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa. 
Their children: — 

G. 1. Charles Scott, b. 12, 3, 1890; d. 3, 16, 1892. 

2. Roma Rachel, b, 9, 17, 1892. 

3. William K., b. 3, 14, 1895. Is being educated at Girard College 

Phila., Pa. 

B 8. C 1. D 2. E 8. F 5. Anna May Lamborn. (Annie, 



Genealogy of the Coaies Family. 257 

Stalker, William, Benjamin, Moses) M: — John H. Pyle, son of 
Atwood and Elizabeth. Their children: — 
G. I. Pearl Elizabeth, b. n, 25, 1894. 
2. Leland J., b. 3, 1, 1897. 

J. H. Pyle is a farmer, resides near Cochranville, Chester Co., 
Pa. 



ACCOUNT OF THE REUNION OF THE COATES FAMILY 
Held in Oxord Park, 9 mo., 6th, 1900. 

Minutes of first Preliminary Meeting: 

On the afternoon of 6th mo., 15th, 1900, a meeting of six- 
teen members of the above family met in the parlors of Dr. Tru- 
man Coats, 25 N. 3rd St., in the Boro. of Oxford to consider the 
advisability of holding a reunion of the Coates famil}\ 

Samuel Coates presided for the day. In his remarks he 
spoke of the idea of a meeting for sociability and of a literary 
character. 

After a full consideration of the subject it was decided to 
hold a reunion. 

Philena Jackson and Ella W. Thomas were appointed a com- 
mittee to gather what histor} T thej r could procure of the family 
and present it at the reunion. It was also spoken of to ask John 
Coates of Highland Township to gather the names and addresses 
with any incidents he can procure of the branch to which he 
belongs and to forward such to Truman Coates. 

Pusey Coates was appointed a committee to procure Lacey's 
Park, in the Boro, in which to hold the Reunion, which he did 
during the afternoon. 

The time for the meeting was decided to be on 9 mo. 6th, 
1900, to convene at 10.30 a. m. 

Truman Coates was appointed a committee on invitation. 
Truman Coates, Secretary, for the day. 



Minutes of second preliminary meeting of Coates Reunion, 



258 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

held 8, 14, 1900, in same place as first meeting, with same Pres. 
and Sec. 

Minutes of preliminary meeting of Coales Reunion held in 
parlors of Dr. Truman Coates, Oxford, Pa., 8, 14, 1900, to per- 
fect arrangements for the Reunion to be held in Oxford Park, 
9th mo. 6th, 1900. 

Minutes of previous meeting read and adopted. It was de- 
cided to hold the Reunion in basket picnic style. Ex. -Mayor 
Joseph R. T. Coates, Atty. of Chester, Pa., was elected to preside 
at the Reunion and Edna Pownall to act as Secretary. 

Committee on Introduction and Exception: — Anna M. Lynch, 
Mary Barnard, Sarah B. Coates, Mary P. Coates, Vincent 
Pownall, Linnaeus Lamborn. 

Committee on Geneology: — Philena Jackson and Ella W. 
Thomas. 

Dr. Truman Coates was appointed to procure a book for 
autographs of those present, and to have the same as his own 
property promising to hold it for inspection for the members at 
his house. 

Granville Coates was appointed Treasurer, and to consult 
with icecream makers for the privilege of selling the same on the 
grounds on that day. 

Dr. Coates was continued a committee on invitation. 

It was decided to ask members of each descendant to arise 
in the audience on call of the historian, while she was reading 
her article on geneology. 

Truman Coates, Secretary, for the day. 



The following is a copy of the report of the Coates Family 
Reunion, held in Oxford Park, Sept. 6th, 1900, copied from 
Oxford Press, issue of Sept. 13, 1900. 

REUNION OF THE COATES FAMILY. 
The clan assembled under the shady chestnuts of Oxford 
Park, on a bright September day and greeted each other as mem- 
bers of a great family. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 259 

Two hundred descendants of Moses and Susanna Coates, who 
brought their certificates from Carlow Monthly Meeting, Ireland, 
to Haverford Monthly Meetingjof Friends, in 1717, held a reunion 
in Oxford Park on Thursday, September 6, 1900. Many of those 
who attended the reunion came by train from the north and 
south, who stopped near the park; others drove in from the 
country. They continued to arrive until the noon hour, when 
dinner was enjoyed in basket picnic style. 

Soon after one o'clock the assembly was called to order by 
the president, Joseph R. T. Coates, Atty., ex-Mayor of Chester. 
Miss S. Edna Pownall, of Christiana, acted as secretary. 

A sweet selection, "The Bell of New York,' ' rendered by 
the Utopian Orchestra, of Elk View, filled the park with melody. 

The Misses Nora and Mary Criswell, of Homeville, sang a 
duet, "The Old Red Cradle," with organ accompanient. 

Music, "Splinters" by Orchestra. 

President Coates made a brief address in which he stated 
Moses and Susanna Coates left the old country on account of 
religious persecution to seek a free country untrameled with theo- 
logical dogmas. He told that he had heard the first Coates was 
a don of Spain, and from there had gone to England. Mr. Coates 
said that while he had wandered from the fold of old Quaker 
faith, he does not feel entirely satisfied. He felt that the reunion 
was instituted and that he hoped that it would be perpetuated in 
years to come. Future reunions would have his help and sub- 
stantial support. The speaker concluded his address by con- 
gratulating the committee, especially Dr. Truman Coates, of Ox- 
ford, on the maiden effort that had been made to inaugurate the 
reunion. President Coates moved that a vote of thanks be ex- 
tended to the Doctor for his continued efforts for the welfare of 
the reunion. 

The next number was a duet, "Silver Bells," by the Misses 
Criswell. The came an original poem by Dr. Coates, which was 
read by William B. Coates, of Gum Tree, and is as follows: 



260 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



OUR ANCESTORS. 

What is the meaning of this crowd, 
Where every body seems so proud, 
While all of them are talking loud 
of our ancestors. 

All trains are in, the Coates have come, 
And Oxford Park is all-a-hum' 
With genealogy of some 

of our ancestors. 

Who was it left his native land, 
And sought this country with his band, 
From Emerald Isle? 'Twas our grand 
old ancestors. 

Moses and Susanna, his wife, 
Crossed the seas for a freer life, 
To land of Penn, with less of strife; 
were our ancestors. 

In seventeen hundred and fifteen, 
Are the first records we have seen 
Of the Coateses, from which we glean 
our ancestry. 

Near Schuylkill river, at Mont Clair, 
In a cave, history tells, is where 
Moses and wife, with children, fair; 
lived our ancestors. 

To Charleston, in Schuylkill Valley, 
Did the Coates at length rally, 
Settled, and from there did sally, 
our ancestors. 

First child, Thomas, with confidence 
Wed S. Miller, of Providence, 
Spent their lives in Cain Township, hence 
are ancestors. 

Next was Samuel, once so small, 
Not the Sam., with us here with-all, 
But he who wed E. Mendenhall; 

and are ancestors. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family 261 

Next, Moses, not of bullrush fame; 
Then Lizzie and William of same, 
And Jonathan, a U.S. name, 

were ancestors. 

Then Aaron, a sturdy good man; 
But the youngest was Benjamin, 
With wife to bless, whose name was Ann, 
and were ancestors, 

But yet another son was born 
To this good pair, for whom we mourn 
The lack of records, thus to form 
our ancestors. 

Then Samuel, a name quite dear, 
Wed A. Thatcher, and lives quite near 
In mind to some aged ones here 
as our ancestors. 

Then Warrick and Levi, now came 
Richard, and third Samuel of same, 
And Thomas, of batchelor fame 
as ancestors. 

Sixth was George, the father of Joe, 
The latter good fellow, we know; 
Whose wife, Nell, thinks Joe is "just so," 
and is an ancestor. 

Then Sarah, lone girl of a fold, 
Came to bless her father's household, 
And from her much could have been told 
of our ancestors. 

Now Joseph, a Medical man, 
Who ended his life with wife, Ann, 
Thus we have the last of this clan 
of ancestors. 

Of present kin, with us today; 

Judge each for self; think what you may — 

Good or ill, we are glad to say 

we are results of such ancestors. 

We know we came from strong, good men 
W e've some warm Irish blood, and then 



262 Genealogy of the Coates Faintly. 

We're in straight line with Quaker Penn, 

and proud of our ancestors. 

Who laid the keel of Noah's Ark, 
And filled, in pairs, that noble bark? 
Ask any Coates within this Park, 

who'll quickly say, "our ancestors." 

Who set the Pyramid's corner stone 
In Afric's sands, now little known ? 
With graceless wink, some Coates will own, 
'twas our ancestors. 

Why go farther, I do believe 
With mention of Adam and Eve, 
Some crafty Coates here might conceive 
they too, were ancestors. 

Samuel Coates of Homeville, read a paper on "The Growth 
of the Century." It was a strong review of the advancement 
made by this nation to the threshold of the twentieth century. 

After a selection "Whistling Rufus," by the Orchestra, Mrs. 
H. C. Thomas, of Oxford, read a paper on the Coates family. 
The paper was well prepared, showing that much research had 
been expended on it, which is as follows: 

GENEALOGY OF THE COATES FAMILY. 

Living in the busy and hurrying world of today with its 
wonderful inventions and discoveries that bridge space and bring 
the news of the globe to every city, village and farm each morn- 
ing, is it not well for us sometimes to pause in our places and 
turn back to consider the lives of our forefathers and to look in- 
to the conditions and circumstances surrounding these pioneers 
that made possible the privileges of today. How brave they 
were, how strong, how venturesome ! The hardships they en- 
dured and the dangers they faced we can never know; can we 
ever imagine them surrounded as we are with the luxuries of 
our times? Ancestry is a fascinating subject and one worthy 
of serious study. 

Two or three generations ago Coates was a well-known name 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 263 

throughout England (Sir Roger Coates was an intimate friend 
of Sir Issac Newton). It is said to be of Norman origin, and 
like all English names of that time was spelled in several 
different ways, the most common of which was Courts, Coats 
and Coates. 

The first mention of the name in America was in 1638, when 
Sir John Coates came to Maryland and soon afterwards obtained 
in the form of Manor a tract of land five miles from the city of 
Washington, which he named Clean Drinking Manor. This is 
a place full of interest to the antiquarian, and is still owned by 
one of his descendants, who lives upon it. 

Another one of the name, Thomas Coates, who came to 
Philadelphia in 1683, from Leicestershire, England, and who soon 
married Beulah H. Saques, became a prosperous merchant in the 
Quaker City, and the head of a large and well-known family, 
many of whom reside there. 

But all of us gathered here today are descendants of Moses 
Coates and his wife Susanna, so our interest settles in them. I 
would we knew more of their lives, but there is nothing but the 
barest outline. We know that they belonged to the Society of 
Friends and were respected in their meeting. The certificate 
they brought with them said that Moses had resided within the 
limits of Carlow Monthly Meeting, which is in the Province of 
Muuster, in the eastern part of Ireland, since a child. There is 
a tradition that his father moved a few years before from Eng- 
land. But his wife Susanna, was a native of Munster, which is 
the southern Province of Ireland. 

As there are no children mentioned in the certificate we pre- 
sume Moses and Susanna emigrated soon after their marriage, 
and we can think of the long trip as their wedding journey. 
How different it must have been from some such journeys taken 
by many of their descendants. They came in all the strength 
and vigor of their young lives to make for themselves a name 
and a home in the new world amongst untold dangers and hard- 
ships. 

Their certificate, dated 3, 8, 1717, was sent to Haverford 



264 Genealogy of the Coates Family. 

Monthly Meeting and they settled near that place. In a few 
years they removed to Gwynedd, Montgomery County, but still 
they were not permanently settled, for in 1731 they recrossed the 
Schuylkill and settled in Charlestown Township. Their land in- 
cluded the present sight of the town of Phoenixville. A poem, 
written by Moses Robinson, a great grandson of Moses Coates, 
says of him: 

In the village of Phoenix and near a small rill, 
That ripples o'er rocks as it descends from a hill, 
By some wild honey locusts and near to the road, 
The Pioneer of the Wilderness took up his abode, 
Where a dark, tangled forest spread over his ground 
And the howling of wolves made the valley resound. 

But there is account of only six sons and one daughter, as 
until only a few weeks ago the name of Thomas, the oldest son, 
was omitted. We trust time will diverge the name of the seventh 
son. 

The oldest son, Thomas, married Sarah Miller ye 21st day 
of ye third month, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven 
hundred any forty-one. The marriage certificate says: "Where- 
as, Thomas Coates, son of Moses Coates of Charlestown, in the 
county of Chester and Province of Pennsylvania, and Sarah 
Miller, daughter of Henry Miller of Providence, in the county 
and Province aforesaid, deceased, having declared their intentions 
of marriage before several Monthly Meetings of ye people called 
Quakers at Providence, etc." (Providence is near Media now 
in Delaware County, but at that time a part of Chester). 

There is a Bible owned by Joseph R. Coates, a direct descen- 
dant, who is present today, which contains: Thomas Coates, 
His Book, A. D. 1740. Then foilows the birth and names of his 
children: Henry C, who never married, Susanna, the only 
daughter, Jonathan, who had a wife, Jane, and Samuel, who 
married Abigail Thatcher, who is the progenitor of most of the 
people here today. 

The second son of Moses and Susanna was Samuel, who 
married Elizabeth Mendenhall in 1743. They had three sons, 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 265 

Aaron, Moses and Isaac. The third son of the emigrants was 
Moses, who married Priscilla Hutchinson of near Penn's Manor. 
Their children were Sarah, Susanna, Phebe, Moses, Mary, John 
Hutchinson, Thomas, Mahlon, Priscilla and Aquilla. Their son 
Moses lived near the old home near Phoenixville. Benedict Arnold, 
after the victory at Saratoga, spent a week at his house. Arnold 
gave a party there under the cherry trees, to which General 
Washington, though invited, did not come. General Gates and 
Miffln and Colonels Davis and Ballard were also quartered at the 
house. Many a load of provisions did Moses Coates haul from 
his home at Phoenixville to the soldiers encamped at Valley 
Forge. After the soldiers had left these historic hills many of 
the rude huts used by them were left standing, and as superstition 
among all classes was prevalent at that time, Moses Coates was 
often called to show how groundless were the people's fears. 
From one of these huts came dismal and ghastly sounds, and the 
word went round that it was haunted. He went to the spot, tore 
away the debris, when out jumped a poor, half starved sheep. 

The fourth (?) son of Moses and Susauna was Benjamin, 
who married Ann Eongstreth in 1756. There were four children, 
Jane, Susanna, Benjamin and Tacy, but as far as we know none 
of their descendants are here. 

The fifth son, Jonathan, married Jane Longstreth and had 
Ann, James, Hannah, Jonathan, Susanna, Phebe, Keziah, Grace, 
Isaac, Jane and Elizabeth. 

The sixth, and last son, Aaron, lived at Haverford, and as 
far as we can ascertain, had no descendants. The only daughter, 
Elizabeth, married John Mendenhall but all traces of their child- 
ren has been lost. 

We much regret that the account of the family is not more 
complete; but the time since this work has been assigned the 
committee has been short and the opportunity for looking up the 
records, deeds etc., has not been what we would desire. Such 
search means an expenditure of time and money, neither of which 
we have to spare. 



266 Genealogy of the Coaies Family, 

In further taking up the family history we will only go along 
the lines of those whose descendants are represented here, or 
those who have shown their interest by responding to the com- 
mittee. If any have been omitted, we crave pardon aud assure 
you the error has been one of ignorance, not of neglect. 

Samuel Coates, born 1749, youngest son of Thomas and 
Sarah, with his wife, Abigail Thatcher, lived in Cain Township, 
near the line of the present Pennsylvania Railroad. Like the 
emigrants, Moses, they had seven sons and one daughter. 

Warrick, the eldest son, was born 1780 and died 1860. In 
1803 he married Eleanor Pusey , in London Grove meeting. They 
settled on a farm in Londonderry Township, where he died. He 
was a man beloved and respected throughout the neighborhood, 
and was often called upon to settle estates, write wills, etc. In 
1856 he married Hannah Darlington. He was the father of 
twelve children, the following of whom grew to maturty: Ellis, 
who married Abigail Coates, and had six children: Samuel, Hartt, 
C, who married Eliza Darlington and ha dsix children, Warrick, 
who married Ruth Anna Cook, and had four children; Susa who 
married George Darlington, and had six children; Sarah, who 
married Thomas Wood and had six children; Abigail who mar- 
ried F. Pratt Hoopes, and had seven children; Philena who mar- 
ried James Lynch, and had four children. The last two only 
survive. 

Levi, the second sou was born in 1781. Soon after his mar- 
riage to Mary Truman he bought a farm adjoining his brother 
Warrick's, in Londonderry Township. The farm is now owned 
and occupied by his sou George. His wife dying he afterward 
married Ann Smith. Levi Coates was a recommended minister 
in the society of Friends. He was an ardent abolitionist, assist- 
ing many runaway slaves to freedom. He was a radical man, 
early refusing to furnish liquor to his harvest hands, but many 
things he advocated which seemed mere theories then, have become 
realities now, and time has made them customs. The following 
children survive him: Truman, who died in 1894, Phebe, who 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 267 

married Pusey Barnard, and had one son, James, and one daught- 
er, Louisa; Hannah, who married Ezra Gray, and had three 
children; Mary who married Dr. Coates Preston, of Chester; 
Amos, who married Sarah Pierce, and had four children: James, 
who married Lydia Moore, and had three children: Elizateth, 
whose home is now in Philadelphia; Ellen who married Isaac 
Jackson, and had two children: George who married Sarah B. 
Clark, and had six children. 

The third son, Richard, was born in 1783. He married 
Rebecca Walker. Their only son was accidentally drowned. He 
afterward married Maria Criswell, and had Sarah Jane Day, 
Susanna, Samuel and Margaret. He removed to Harford County, 
Md., not far from Delta, where he died. 

The fourth son, Samuel was born in 1786, married Margaret 
Cherrington, their children were Esther Wildeman, Anna Mcore, 
Abigail Coates, Mary Cutler, Sarah Harris, and their only son, 
Cherrington. A letter from Wenona Helltnan, a daughter of 
Sarah Harris gives some items concerning her interesting life. 
While traveling on a Mississipi steamboat, going to St. Paul, she 
met Captain Harris, of Galena, 111., whom she soon married. 
They had seven children. In 1877 she graduated in medicine 
and was a successful physician until her death in 1886. She was 
a reformer, an interested worker in abolition, temperance, woman 
suffrage, and whatever she believed tended to the betterment of 
mankind. 

The fifth son, Thomas, born in 1787, was a carpenter, and 
traveled in the south. He never married. 

The sixth son, George, married Martha Irwin, and had six 
children: Sarah Jane, who married William Webb, and had two 
sons; Margaret, who married Nathan Pyle, and had seven chil- 
dren; and Joseph R., who possesses the old Bible that is so full 
of interest, having family records back to 1740, Late in life 
George married Jehosheba King, who was a widow. The others 
did not marry. 

The only daughter, Sarah, born 1792, married Asahel 



268 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

Walker in 1813, and lived on the Walker estate near Christiana, 
Lancaster County. They had nine children: Anna, who mar- 
ried William Cooper; Susan, who married Moses Pownall; Phebe, 
who married William Cooper; Sarah, who married Sylvester Lin- 
ville; Samuel, who married Sarah Haines; Asahel Walker, Jos. C, 
who married Lucy Ellmaker, Mary, who married Alfred Ellmak- 
er; Margaretta, who married Francis J. Pennock. 

The seventh son, and youngest child, Joseph, was born 1794, 
studied medicine, and settled near Coatesville, where he attained 
much success, but unfortunately, death soon claimed him. His 
wife was Ann Roberts, and their only daughter, Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Jerard Hopkins, who died in 1896. Mr. Hopkins is in his 
84th year, and resides in Baltimore with a daughter, Elizabeth 
J., and two sons, Jerard T. Hopkins, Jr., and Roger Brooke 
Hopkins. 

Mention has been made of the known descendants of Thomas, 
the oldest son of the emigrants. The second son of Moses and 
Susanna, Samuel, who married Elizabeth Mendenhall in 1743, 
had three sons, Aaron, Moses born 1745, and Isaac born 1748. 
This Moses married Hannah Musgrave in 1770, and had two 
daughters, Elizabeth and Hannah. He afterward married Mary 
Vickers, and had Hannah, Isaac, Ann, Caleb, Esther, Elisha, 
Sarah, Mary, Moses, Aquilla, Amos and Jesse. Elizabeth mar- 
ried Jesse Kersey. The last named Jesse is the Doctor Coates so 
well known in the neighborhood of Coatesville. In the "History 
of Chester County/' this Moses is given as the son of Moses, an 
error we would be glad to see corrected. Moses, born 1789, mar- 
ried Lydia Taylor, of Kenuett, and had Moses, Ann, Isaac T., 
Joseph R. T., Amos Aquilla and Jesses Aquilla. 

The third son of Samuel and Elizabeth Mendenhall, was 
Isaac, who married Hannah Stalker. Their children were, 
Beulah, Grace, Lydia, Rebecca, Seymore, Amy, Zillah, Israel 
and Lindley. The daughter Lydia, married Mark Hughes, and 
had several children, some of whom reside in the neighborhood 
of West Grove. The daughter Amy, married Mahlon Preston, 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 269 

and her descendants are in and around Wilmington, Delaware. 

Moses, son of Moses Coates and Priscilla Hutchinson, soon 
after his marriage to Hannah Moore in 1795, emigrated to Vir- 
ginia, where his daughter Eliza, married William Cowgill. Their 
daughter Hannah, in 1841 married David Walker, Tredyffrin, 
and had four children. 

Sarah, a daughter of Moses and Priscilla, married Thomas 
Robinson in 1771. They settled on a farm near Phoenixville, on 
the Schuylkill River. When the canal was dug in 1822, there 
was an outbreak of fever in the vicinity, Thomas Robinson, his 
wife, and daughter Rebecca, all died within a few week of each 
other. There were seven children: Rachel, born 1773, married 
William Davis, many of whose descendants live in and around 
Christiana, Pennsylvania; Moses, born 1774, married Anna 
Thomas; William, born 1776, went to Port Carbon, Pennsylvania; 
Thomas, born 1779, moved to Illinois; Priscilla, born 1783, mar- 
ried James Walker of Rehobeth, Tredyffrin Township; Sarah, 
born 1787; and Rebekah, born 1793, never married. The oldest 
son, Moses Robinson was the author of the poem from which we 
have quoted. He was a beautiful penman, a surveyor, and one 
of the first farmers to introduce hedges into this country. 

Thus in a brief and imperfect way we have spoken of a few 
of the progeny of our emigrant father and mother. And as far 
as we know, does not the old adage hold true, "Like father, like 
son." Doubtless some members of this large family are scattered 
all over this large country, and possibly all over the world, yet 
how many are living near the land of their forefathers. Many, 
very many, like the old father, till the soil for their livehood, 
and are honest farmers. Good ones they should be for the old 
poem says: 

In morning, to the forest he would go with his axe, 
And in health he did never from his labour relax, 
Till his energy and strength made the wilderness yield, 
And a rich, yellow harvest waved over his field. 
His labour each year did new beauties disclose, 
And the wilderness blossomed like unto the rose. 
The beauties of Ceres his labours beguiled, 
And where late was a desert, a paradise smiled, 



270 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

The study of medicine lias been an attractive one to the sons 
of the race, and for many years past, as well as at the present, 
worth M.D., have added honor to the family. If there are few 
or no millionaires amongst us, we can say with pride that, as far 
as we know, there are no criminals or paupers, and yet, as Saxe 

says: 

Depend upon it, my snobbish friend, 

Your family thread you can't ascend, 

Without good reason to apprehend 

You will find it waxed at the farther end 

By some plebean vocation! 

Or worse than that, your boasted line 

May end in a loope of stronger twine, 

That plagued some worthy relation: 
If, therefore, there has not been interest shown in this his- 
tory of the Coates lineage and if there has not been much pride 
of family amongst us, shall we not henceforth try to live worthily 
as sons and daughters of worthy fathers and mothers. Let us 
teach the children — the coming fathers and mothers — that they 
must not only bring honor and fame to their own lives, but must 
shed glory on the honest name of Coates. May its honor never 
be dimmed by an unworthy act of one of its children. And if, in 
coming years, another reunion shall be held, if in 1917, once 
again the family shall be called together, may only noble, honest 
God-like deeds be recorded of any one of its children, and so, in 
the words of Tiny Tim, we say in closing, "God bless us every 
one." 

THE CONCLUDING EVENTS. 

Miss Pownall read the minutes of the preliminary meetings 
held at Dr. Coates' which were approved. 

Duet, " We Tread the Path that Duty Leads/- by Misses 
Cress well. 

Brief remarks respecting the Coates family and reunion were 
made by Howard Coates of Little Brittain, John Coates of High- 
land, James Lynch of Oxford, Agustus Brosius of Avondale, 
Alice Coates of Little Brittain, Mrs. Anna Harris Jencks of 
Galena, 111., Major WilliamLamborn of Washington, D. C. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 271 

A permanent committee was appointed to secure further data 
of the Coates genealogy. The committee consists of Mrs. Philena 
Jackson of Bartvilie, I\Irs. Harry C. Thomas of Oxford, Dr. 
Truman Coates of Oxford, Miss S. Edna Pownall of Christiana, 
Miss Anna M. Lynch of Oxford, Joseph R. T. Coates, Esq., of 
Chester, and Mrs. Ella P. Conard of Port Kennedy. 

After the Orchestra played "Pride of the Ball," and the 
president made a few remarks of a congratulatory character the 
reunion closed. 

Photographer Thomas of Oxford took a large photograph of 
the assembl}'. It is a fine picture showing each individual in the 
large company. 

Since the landing of Moses and Susanna eight generations 
have been in existence four of which were represented at the re- 
union. The oldest was Abigail Coates Hoopes of West Chester, 
who was born 4th month 30, 1817, in Londonderry Township, 
Chester County. 

The idea of the reunion was conceived by Dr. Truman Coates, 
who was afterward assisted, with others, by Miss AnnaM. Lynch, 
of Oxford, Joseph R. Coates of Richardsmere, Maryland, and 
Samuel Coates of Hotneville. 



Minutes of Coates Reunion, held 9 mo. 6th, 1900: 
Meeting was opened by Samuel Coates introducing Hon. 
Joseph R. T. Coates, Ex-Mayor of Chester, Pa., president for 
the day. 

The Utopian Orchestra played "Belle of New York." 
Creswell sisters sang ' 4 The Old Red Cradle." 
The Orchestra then favored us with a selection ' 'Splinters.' * 
The President gave a short address, showing marked interest 
in the family of which he was a member. He told that he had 
heard the first Coates was a Don of Spain, and from there had 
gone to England. Following this the Creswell sisters sang * 'Sil- 
ver Bells." A poem, written by Dr. Coates on "Our Ancestors," 
was read by William B. Coates of Highland Township. This 



272 Genealogy of the Coatcs Family. 

poem caused much amusement by its humorous way of presenting 
to us otherwise dry facts. Samuel Coates addressed the meeting 
on "The Growth of the Century/' pointing out the marvelous 
improvements and advancement in every line of work over that 
of a century ago, and showing the youth their greater opportun- 
ities therefore their greater responsibilities. 

Orchestra played "Whistling Rufus." 

The geneology was then read by Ella W. Thomas. The 
carefully collected history of the family was related in a most 
pleasing and interesting manner. A copy of this will be pre- 
served elsewhere. Minutes of two preliminary meetings, held in 
Dr. Coates' parlors were next read. 

Creswell sisters sang "We Tread the Path that Duty Leads." 

It was moved and carried that a copy of the history and any 
other valuable information be sent to each member of the family. 

It was moved and carried unanimously that a vote of thanks 
be extended to Dr. Truman Coates for his work in arranging for 
this family reunion. 

Five minute speeches followed, most of which helped to 
impress upou us the importance and benefit derived from such 
family gatherings. 

Many expressed the desire that this first be only the prelim- 
inary for many reunions. Howard Coates and John Coates re- 
sponded to the call of their names. 

Orchestra played "The Belle of the Village." 

Five minute speeches were continued by James L}mch, Alice 
Coates, Agustus Brosius, Anna Coates Harris Jenckes, and Wil- 
liam Hughes Larnborn. 

It was moved and carried that the persons who served on 
committee for organization be continued as a permanent one for 
investigating, for future meetings. Ella W. Thomas, Dr. Tru- 
man Coates, and Edna Pownall were considered as members of the 
committee. It was moved and carried that three names be 
added to those already mentioned, to form the committee. 
The persons were: — Anna M. Lynch, Joseph R. T. Coates, 



Genealogy of the Coates Fainily. 



273 



Ella P. Conard. It was moved and seconded that two more 
names be added but this motion was lost. 

After the Orchestra played "Pride of the Ball," and a few 
remarks from the President, the meeting adjourned. 

S. Edna Pownaix, Secretary. 



A list of names and addresses of those present at the Coates 
Reunion held in Oxford Park, 9 mo., 6th, 1900, and who signed 
their names in the register: 
Elizabeth F. Coates, 

Coatesville, Pa. 
Abigail Hoopes, 

West Chester, Pa. 
Sarah J. Day, 

Delta, York Co., Pa. 
Elizabeth Coates, 

2019 Arch St., Phila., Pa. 
George Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Joseph R. Coates, 

Rising Sun, Md. 
Ellen M. Coates, 

Rising Sun, Md. 
Lewis G. Lamborn, 

Coleraine, Pa. 
Annie C. Lamborn, 

Coleraine, Pa. 
John B. Tanguy, 

West Grove, Pa. 
Alnora E. Tanguy, 

West Grove, Pa, 
George S. Lamborn, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 
Sarah W. Lamborn, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 



Elizabeth R. Maule, 

Coleraine, Pa. 
Elmira B, Coates, 

Coatesville, Pa. 
Roma R. Lamborn, 

Coleraine, Pa. 
William Lamborn, 

Coleraine, Pa. 
Mary P. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
L. Irea Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Leonda C. Lamborn, 

Lincoln University, Pa. 
Annie E. Lamborn, 

Lincoln University, Pa. 
Ethel Lamborn, 

Lincoln University, Pa. 
Bennie Lamborn, 

Lincoln University, Pa. 
Marguerite Lamborn, 

Lincoln University, Pa. 
George Deeble Miller, 

313 N. 33rd St., Phila., 
Edward B. Conard, 

Port Kennedy, Pa. 



274 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



W. D. Blackburn, 

Fishertown, Pa. 
Lucretia M. Blackburn, 

Fishertown, Pa. 
Samuel P. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Annie C. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Harold T. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Elena S. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Ernest W. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Miriam E. Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Ann Mary Martin, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
William Lamborn, 

Washington, D. C. 
Mary D. Coates, 

Chester, Pa. 
Howard Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Alice M. Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Phebe L. Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Hartt Graudum Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Charles Sutton Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Joseph A. Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 
Howard Bennett Coates, 

Little Britain, Pa. 



Ella V. Conard, 

Port Kennedy, Pa. 
Eliza C. Walker, 

Port Kennedy, Pa. 
Eva Coates Broomell, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
J. Howard Broomell, 

Cochranville, Pa 
Pusey Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Adaline B. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
William B. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Alice R. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Anna Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Joseph R. T. Coates, Atty. 

Chester, Pa. 
Eleanor D. Walton, 

Parkerville, Pa. 
Charles B. Walton, 

Parkerville, Pa. 
Lydia A. Darlington, 

Lenape, Pa. 
Sallie M. Speakman, 

Longwood, Chester Co., Pa. 
Helen Darlington, 

Lenape, Pa. 
Geo. T. Webb, 

New Garden, Ches. Co., Pa. 
Almena R. Webb, 

New Garden, Ches. Co., Pa. 
Mary Alice Walker Ellmaker, 

Gap, Lancaster Co., Pa. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



275 



Cassie S. Bolton, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 
W. P. Bolton, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 
Theodore Bolton, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 
Leslie I Bolton, 

Liberty Square, Pa. 
Ralph Cutler, 

Fern Glen, Lane. Co., Pa. 
Elizabeth J. Coates, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Katharine E. Springer, 

Chester, Pa. 
Benj. P. Coates, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Nellie Coates, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Edgar T. Miller, 

Media, Pa. 
Ann C. Miller, 

313 N. 33rd St., Phila., Pa 
John Coates, 

Lenover, Pa. 
Walker Coates Pennock, 

235 E. Logan Sq. , Phila. ,Pa 
Eugenia Day, 

Harford Co., Md. 
S. Edna Pownall, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Georgiana Walter, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Lydia E. Guthrie, 

Malvern, Pa. 
David W. Jackson, 

Bartville, Pa. 



Geo. G. Hughes, 

Phoenixville, Pa. 
Jennie Cutler, 

Fern Glen, Lane. Co., Pa. 
Luella D. Cutler, 

Fern Glen, Lane. Co., Pa. 
Joseph S. Cutler, 

Fern Glen, Lane. Co., Pa. 
Samuel Coates, 

Collarmar, Pa. 
Anna Harris Jenckes, 

Galens, 111. 
Geo. D. Coates, 

Glenroy, Pa. 
Philena C. Lynch, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Harry C. Thomas, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Ella W. Thomas, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Philena L. Thomas, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Florence R. Brosius, 

Avondale, Pa. 
Mary J. Brosius, 

Avondale, Pa. 
Agustus Brosius, 

Avondale, Pa. 
Ellen Hoopes, 

West Chester, Pa. 
Harry C. Guthrie, 

Malvern, Pa. 
Hazel E. King, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Mary Coates Moore, 

Christiana, Pa. 



276 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 



Philena C. W. Jackson, 

Bartville, Pa. 
Lindley D. Jackson, 

Bartville, Pa. 
Elizabeth Westfield Jackson, 

Bartville, Pa. 
Stephen Coates, 

Hopewell C. W., Pa. 
Lydia A. Coates ; 

Hopewell. C. W., Pa. 
Ann Coates Lewis, 

Passadena, Cal. 
Chas. Lewis, 

Passadena, Cal. 
Horace King, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Mary E. King, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Nina A. King, 

Phristiana, Pa. 
Jennie Elva Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Annie Coates, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Lydia Coates, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Ester Coates, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Emma Coates, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Parker Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Lillie Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Harry Orville Coates, 

Collamer, Pa. 



Charles T. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Mary L. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Lydia M. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Mina Pearl Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Brinton Walter, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
W. D. Shivery, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Lvtella Maranda Shivery, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Samuel Norwood Shivery, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Wiiliam L. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Lottie Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Gailen P. Boyce, 

Hensel, Pa. 
Melvin C. Boyce, 

Hensel, Pa. 
Aimee P. Coates, 

Hopewell C W., Pa. 
Edna D. Coates. 

Hopewell C W., Pa. 
Norman Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Lafayette Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Chas. S. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Linford Webster, 

Collamer, Pa. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



277 



Edith C. Keech, 

Glen Roy, Pa. 
Jacob Keech, 

Glen Roy, Pa. 
Rebecca Kecch, 

Glen Roy, Pa. 
Elizabeth K. Boyce, 

Hensel, Pa. 
Mary H. Pownall, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Elizabeth P. Walton, 

Christiana, Pa. 
James T. Barnard, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Dora D. Barnard, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Mary T. Barnard, 

Collamer, Pa. 
B. F. Walter, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Joseph A. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Mary H. Turner, 

Spruce Grove, Pa. 
Carrie D. Whiteside, 

Spruce Grove, Pa. 
Anna M. Whiteside, 

Spruce Grove, Pa. 
Sallie Ellmaker Ambler, 

Quarryville, Pa. 
Lydia A. Reed, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Alberta W. Wickersham, 

Russelville, Pa. 
Susanna Wood, 

Russelville, Pa. 



Estella E. Webster, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Marion B. Webster, 

Collamer, Pa. 
Harry W. Barnard, 

Collamer, Pa. 
J. D. C. Pownall, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Ehvood K. Pusey, 

Elk View, Pa. 
Mignonette C. Pusey, 

Elk View, Pa. 
Catherine D. Echternach, 

Christiana, Pa. 
William Webster, 

Russelville, Pa. 
Anna S. Webster, 

Russellville, Pa. 
Sharpless C. Webster, 

Russelville. Pa. 
Raymond C. Webster, 

Russelville, Pa. 
John T. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Mary C. Webster, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Lillian C. Webster, 

Christiana, Pa. 
Geo. Webster, 

Christiana, Pa. 
W. J. Wickersham, 

Russelville, Pa. 
Wm. C. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
Anna M. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 



278 



Genealogy of the Coates Fa?nily. 



George M. Tyler, 

Media, Pa. 
James Lynch, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Susanna L. Frorer, 

King of Prussia, Pa. 
Catharine Charlton Frorer, 

King of Prussia, Pa. 
Laura E. Lynch, 

Oxford, Pa. 
J. H. Pyle, 

New London, Pa. 
A. May Pyle, 

New London, Pa. 
Leland J. Pyle, 

New London, Pa. 
Priscilla B. Coates, 

Lenover, Pa. 

C. A. Moore, 



Frederic H. Coates, 

Cochranville, Pa. 
F. J. Coates, 

Lenover, Pa. 
Frank F. Coates, 

Coatesville, Pa. 
Mrs. Morris T. Wood, 

Doe Run, Pa. 
Anna M. Lynch, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Dora M. Newcomer, 

Octoraro, Lane. Co., Pa. 
Sarah B. Coates, 

Oxford, Pa. 
Truman Coates, M. D., 

Oxford, Pa. 
Granville Coates, 

Glen Roy, Pa. 
Christiana, Pa. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 279 

COATES' ARMS. 



Two Locality not named. 

1. Coates — Or, A cross azure voided of the field, bezantee. 

2. Coetes — Gules three boars passaut argent Crest: — A 
swan's head between two wings argent. 

3. Coates — Coates of Coates House, Herford. Gules a grey- 
hound statant within an orle of roses argent. Crest: — Upon a 
mount vert a greyhound couchant argent, colared and lined or 
resting the dexter paw on a rose gules. Motto: — Est voluntas 
Dei. (Combe House is in Radnor, Wales). 

4. Coats of Whitton, Radnor. Same as No. 3. 

5. Coats or Coates. (Yorkshire and Shropshire). Quarter- 
ly 1 and 4, ermine) 2 and 3 paly or six or and sable. Crest: — A 
cock proper combed, wattled and legged gules. 

6. Coates. (Confirmed in 1859 to James Coates Esq., of 
Eastwood County Down). Quarterly 1 and 4 ermine; 2 and 3 
paly of six argent and azure in the center chief point a mullet 
gules. Crest: — On a mount vert a cock proper combed, wattled 
and legged gules and charged with a mullet of the last. Motto: 
Vigilan et andex. 

7. Coats. (London). Per pale or and azure two dolphins 
erect on a chief sable a covered cup of the first between two dove 
cotes argent. Crest: — An arm coupled below the elbow erect, 
vested paly of six or and azure, cuff argent, holding a covered 
cup as in the arms. 

8. Coats. — (Glasgow 1763) Argent a stag's head erased 
gules between the horns a pheon azure all between three coats 
proper. Crest: An anchor proper. Motto: Be firm. 

9. Coats:— (Sir Peter Coates, Knt. 1869) Or a stag's head 
erased gules between the attires a pheon azzure all between three 
mascles sable. Crest: A hand holding a helmet proper. Motto: 
Our paratior. 



280 Genealogy of the Coates Family, 

10. Coates:— (Ferguslie, County Renfew, Scotland, 1869) 
The same as No. 9 within a bordure 5# £&. Same crest and motto. 

EXPLANATION OF TERMS. 

Or — Yellow, or gold color, represented in drawing or en- 
graving, by small dots. 

Azure — A blue color, represented in engraving by horizontal 
parallel lines. 

Gules — Red lines, named from red color of the throat, used 
in seals, and engraving parallel vertical lines. 

Argent — Silver color, shining. 

Vest — Green, represented in engravings by parallel lines, 
sloping downward toward the right. 

Ermine — White. 

Sable — Black, represented by vertical and horizontal lines 
crossing each other. 

Proper — Natural color. 

Attires — Antlers. 

Bezantee — Round. 



ADDENDA. 



MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE OF WARRICK COATES 
AND ELENOR PUSEY. 

Whereas, Warrick Coates of the Township of East Cain, 
County of Chester and State of Pennsylvania, sou of Samuel and 
Abigail Coates, the latter deceased, and Elenor Pusey, of Town- 
ship of Londongrove, County and State aforesaid, daughter of 
EHs and Abigail Pusey, having declared their intentions of Mar- 
riage with each other before several Monthly Meetings of the 
People Called Quakers, at Londongrove iu the County and State 
aforesaid, according to the good order used among them; and 
having consent of Parents, their said proposal of Marriage was 
allowed of by said Meeting. 

Now these are to certify whom it may concern that for the 
full accomplishing their said intention this sixth day of fourth 
month, in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
three, they the said Warrick and Elenor Pusey appeared in a Pub- 
lic Meeting of the said people at Londongrove, etc. Witnesses 
present: 

Warrick Coates. 
Elenor Coates 



Caleb Swayne 
Joel Bailey 
Lewis Pennock 
Saml. Swayne 
Edwd. Brookes 
Jeremiah Barnard 
John Man 
Caleb Pusey 



Ann Woodward 

Mary Swayne 

Phebe Bailey 

Elizabeth Wilson 

Rachel Pennock 

Esther Coates 

Susan Glacden 

Polly Miller 

(281) 



Elizabeth Wilkinson 
Eliza Woodward 
Deborah Woodward 
Saml. Coates 
Ellis Pusey 
Abigail Pusey 
Hannah Coates 
Hannah Pusey 



282 



Addenda. 



John Pennock 
George Carson 
Joshua Bailey 
Francis Wilkinsou 
Joseph Smith 
Abigail Moore 
Sarah England 
Ruth Pennock 
Eiizabeth Pennock 
Ann Martin 
Hannah Swayne 
Elizabeth Pusey 



Joshua Walton 

Hannah Walton 

Daniel G. Temple 

John Brinton, Jr. 

Moses Moore 

John Pyle 

Phebe Chambers 

Susan Wilkinson 

L,ydia Pyle 

Mahlon Phillips 

Francis Wilkinson 

Geo. Edge 



My beloved wife departed this life the 6th 
year. — Warrick Coates. 



Susan Pusey 
Abigail Pusey, Jr. 
Lydia Pusey 
Ellis Pusey, Jr. 
L,evi Coates 
Richard Coates 
Mary Passmore 
Susan Husband 
Wm. Husband 
John Vickers 
Samuel Coates, Jr. 
Edith Pusey 
of 8th Mo., 1850, in her 59th 



ACCOUNT OF THE PUSEY LINE DIRECT TO ELENOR. 

The first of the Pusey line in this country was William, who 
married 9, 5, 1707, Elizabeth Bowater, and settled in London 
Grove, Chester County, Pa. Their son Joshua, b. 11, 9, 1714; 
d. 8, 16, 60; mar. 8, 29, 1734, Mary Kewis. Their son Ellis, b. 
6, 21, 1735; d. 9, 27, 1808; mar. 1st, Susanna Bailey, 2nd, 1 mo. 
30, 1777, Abigail Brinton. Their wedding ceremony (Friends) 
was defered for a day on account of battle of Brandywine, and 
family went to cellar for protection. Their daughter Elenor mar- 
ried Warrick Coates. 

William Pusey is supposed to have come to this Country 
about 1700, and was probably a nephew of Caleb Pusey who was 
with William Peun. He (Caleb) may have been a son of John 
Pusey of London. 

Caleb Pusey House, near Chester, oldest building in Penn- 
sylvania, having been built in 1683. Occupied by William Penn 
during occasional visits.* 

*Pennsylvania, Colonial and Federal, by Howard Jenkins, 1903. 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 283 

AnnaE. Boyce, b. 1, 29, 1906, daughter of Elizabeth (Keech) 
and Gailen Boyce. 

Rebecca D. Keech, (dau. Edith), married 3, 7, 1906, to J. 
Curtis McCullough, son of George. 

Linda Hoopes, daughter of Henry and Rebecca, married 10, 
18, 1905, to Fred Shaw Easton, Jr., of Lowville, N.Y. 

Died: — At her homeJn-lXrumore Township, ^Lancaster Co., 
Pa., Sarah W., wife of George S. Eamborn.^ 

Sarah Elsa, daughter of Homer and Laura (Coates) Reed, 
married 4, 18, 1906, to Alfred Worthington Stone, at home of 
bride's parents, 611 West 10th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Died, 2mo., 22, 1906, at her home in Druniore Township, 
Lancaster Co., Pa., Sarah Walker Coates, wife of George S. 
Lamborn. A birthright member of the religious socitey of 
Friends. Her life was one of devotion to her family and Maker, 
following the divine dictates of "The Inner Light" to a ripe age, 
and ready to receive the "well done.'" Interred in Druniore 
Friends Burying Ground. 



INDEX OF NAMES. 



B 



Ashton, Peter 
Alexander, Emma 
Ambler, Evan T. 

Caroline W. 

Mary E. 
Ames, Chas. S. 
Amicost, Richard 
Arnold, Jos. 

James M. 

Belle 

Florence 

Gertrude 

Benedict 
Allison, Susan T. 
Atlee, John 

Mabel A. 

Isaac P. 

Walter 

John W. 

Mabel L. 

Jesse 

Felecie 

Victile 

Marie 

Elizabeth 
Acie, Elizabeth 
Abrahams, Martha A. 

James 

Susan 

Martha M. 
Avery, Elizabeth 
Anderson, Isaac 

Shemineth 

Christian 



PAGE. 
27, 152 
78 
79 
79 
79 
73 
120 

ii5» H7 
115. 147 
"5, 147 
ii5» i47 
ii5»M7 
147 
125 
128 
128 
128 
128 
128 
129 
129 
129 
129 
129 
129 
161 
171 
171 
171 
169 

151 

157. 192,193 

183 

251 



Beale, J. Benley 


10, 12 


Buckwalter, Francis 


18, 19, 20 


Jacob 


172 


Phebe 


172 


Elizabeth 


172, 173 


Sarah 


172 


Mary E. 


173 


Henrietta J. 


173 


Isaac B. 


i73 


Brogan, John 


25 


Beven, Stephen 


26 


Barry, James 


169 


Beck, 


178 


Brosius, Adaline 


66 


William 


66 


Lydia 


66 


Annie 


63 


Joseph H. 


63 


Mary 


63 


Agustus 


69, 270 


Henry 


69 


Rachel 


69, 130 


Florence 


69, 130 


Bertha 


69 


Arthur 


69 


Mary 


69 


Marriott 


130 


Clarkson 


130 


Gertrude 


130 


Lunetta R. 


130 


Grace A. 


130 


Boyd, Alice K. 


53 


Lena 


138 



(284) 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



285 



Bicknell, John H. 


53 


Blackman, Wm. W. 


72 


Barnard, Pusey 


53, 72 


Sarah 


72 


Jas. 
Jeremiah 


S3 


Kenneth 


72 


53 


Elinor 


72 


Abigail 


53 


Wm. J. 


72 


Phebe 


53 


Brunner, Helen 


62 


Jas. T. 


53, 7 1 


Bayee, Gaillen P. 


65 


M. Louisa 


53,72 


Melvin C. 


65 


Rebecca 


53, 72 


Edith A. 


65 


Anna M. 


53 


Ruth 


167 


Joseph 


92 


Barnes, Leslie 
Blaker, W. E. 


68 
182 


Oriana P. 


72 










Booze, Mira 


181 


Mary T. 
Wm. D. 


72 
72 


J.N. 


181 






Brinton, Jesse H. 


68 


Harry W. 


72 


Moses 


68 


Milton E. 


72 


Margaret A. 


68 


Everett 


72 


S. Laura 


68 


Mary 


25S 


C. Marion 


68 


Buchanan, James 33, 8 


1, 83, 84 


Almatenia 


68 


Bailey, John 


35 


Stella 


68 


Ester 


160 


Mabel 


112 


Jennie 


184 


John 


in 


Boone, Hannah (Lee) 


37,7i 


Sarah 


112 


Wm. A. 


117 


Jane 


ii5 


Barnaby, Jas. 


40 


Bar key, Benj. 


181 


Brown, Kirk 


15 


Clare 


181 


Jeremiah, Jr. 


53 


Alice 


181 


Azariah 


53 


John D. 


181 


Lewis 


53 


Tulles 


181 


Virginia 


119, J 47 


Edna 


181 


Ella 


125 


Wm. E. 


181 


Bingaman, Sallie 


172 


Brownlee, John 


182 


Phebe 


172 


George 


182 


Lidie 


172 


Agnes I. 


182 


Emma 


172 


Irene A. 


182 


Christman 


172 


Agnes 


182 


Blackman, M.D., Wm. W. 


57 


Raymond 


182 


Elinor 


57 


Edna 


182 


Wm. 


57 


Lorna M. 


182 


De Forest L. 


71 


Wm. A- 


182 


Amos 


7i 


Alice J. 


182 


E. Jennie 


7i 


Geo. W. 


182 



286 



Index of Names 



Biddle, Clement, Jr. 


130 


Black, Mary 


116, 147 


Elizabeth 


130 


Berney, A. 


172 


Caroline 


130 


Frank 


172 


Bing, James 


136 


Bache, Fannie 


118 


Brockett, A. 


136 


Anthony 


118 


Borden, Ferman 


167 


Barney, Ora A. 


118 


James 


169 


Hiram W. 


118 


Elizabeth 


169 


Sarah B. 


118 


Bitting, Wm, 


174 


Eva M. 


118 


Baker, Thos. 


69 


Wm. H. 


118 


Geo. L, 


69 


Sarah H. 


118 


Mary A. 


69, 119 


Barton, Caroline 


119 


Buffington, Albert L. 


77 


Bordman, Jas. 


124 


Edwin 


77 


Benedict John A. 


125 


Hannah 


77 


Anna 


125 


Beaver, Laura 


73 


Harriett 


125 


Bolton, Wilmer 


74 


Buckman, Franklin 


128 


Jasan 
Anna 


74 
74 


Balance, Mary 


245 


Theodore 


74 


Brooke, Rebecca 


246 


Leslie 


74 


Brownson, Harriett 


129 


Edgar 


74 


Anna 


iS5 


Blackburn, W. Dorsey 


7Q 


Bane, John 


153. l62 


Hiram 


79 


Mary 


162 


Mary A. 


79 


Ballard, Col. 


i54, 15 7 


Hermine 


79 


Brock, Isaac 


211 


Edith 
Elenor 


79 
79 


Brockway, Hill 


"3 


Evelyn 


79 


Barkley, Henry 


224 


Bachelor, Geo. 


44 


Bonaparte, Joseph 


229 


Boyles, John 


16 


Bunting, Anna 


185 


Broomell, J. Howard 


81 


David 


185 


Saml. H. 


81 


Hannah 


185 


Mary 


81 


Barry, D. 


238 


Helen 


Si 


Bear, Hannah 


238 


Blackey, Wm. 


105 


Berry, Laura 


240 


Bonnell, Elizabeth H. 


ll 3 


Reece 


240 


Booth, Lydia 


112 


Julia 


240 


Saml. 


112 


Bushong, Elmira 


256 


Dorothy C. 


112 


John 


256 


Gilbert B. 


112 


Elizabeth 


256 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



287 



Coates, Thomas 8, 9, 14, 24, 32, 33, 

34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 45, 46, 82, 

83, 84, 85, 86, 92, 135, 150, 

151, 152, 154, 163, 165, 230, 

251. 

Thos. A., 123 

Henry T. 9, 32, 33, 36 

Henry R. 122, 127 

John 9, 25, 114, 115, 147, 161, 

164, 246, 253, 255, 257, 270 

John T. 56 

John S. in, 122 

John H. 151 

John G. 122, 123 

John L. 127 

John H. 162, 163, 165, 166. 

William 9, 64, 115, 241, 250, 

251,253- 
Wm, B. 66, 113, 255, 257 

Wm. P. 166 

Wm. T. 122 

Wm. G. 125 

Wm. C. 146 

Jane 9, 116, 119, 147, 151, 

163, 171, 242, 243, 244, 250. 

Jane L. 162 

0. 9 

Moses 12, 13,14, 15, 16, 17, 

18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 

27, 29, 31, 34, 35, 36, 81, 8 2) 

83, 84,85,88, 89, 90, 91, 

92, 109, in, 113, 115, 120, 

i3 6 > i37i 147, !5o, I5 1 * I 5 2 > 
157, 158, 161, 163, 164, 165, 
186, 236, 241, 246, 247,250 
256. 



Coates, Susanna, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 22, 24, 25, 32, 35, 36, 

35, 50, 51, 66, 89, 90,92, 93, 

151, 153, 164, 165, 241, 242, 
243, 251, 252, 259. 

Samuel, 14, 24, 25, 32, 35, 

3 6 > 37, 3 8 , 39, 44, 45, 5°, 6 4, 
83, 84,87, 88, 92, 109, 115, 
137, I5 1 . !5 2 , 244, 246, 247, 
257, 262, 271, 172. 
Elizabeth, 14, 28, 32, 35, 44, 
50, 57, 63, 87, %%. 90, 91, 92, 
109, 126, 150, 151, 243, 244, 

245, 246, 247, 251, 254, 255 
Elizabeth G., 122 
Elizabeth J. 129 
Jonathan, 14, 28, 29, 32, 35, 

36, 92, 151, 152, 163, 242, 
243, 244, 245, 250, 251. 

Jonathan, Jr. 242 

Aaron, 14, 19, 89, 90, 113, 

r 33, J 3 6 - J 37, IS 1 ! i5 2 , 245, 

246, 247. 

Benjamin, 14, 28, 57, 151, 

152, 166, 245, 246, 250, 251, 
252. 

Benj. F, 175 

Morton 20 

Moses, Jr., 20, 22, 25, 28, 35, 

ii3, 152, 153, 154, 157, 252. 

Henry 20, 83, 92 

Sarah 21, 32, 35, 37, 3 8 , 40, 

45,46, 56, 59, 90. in, 113, 

!5°, !53, 154, 157, 163, 176, 

251. 

Sarah P. 116 

Sarah H. 162 

Sarah E. 166 

Hannah 21, 22, 43, 55, SS f 

91, 109, in, 114, 116, 117, 

119, 120, 122, 132, 133, 134, 

135, J 37, i3 8 , l6 2, 164, 165, 

241,243, 244. 



288 



Index of Names. 



Coates, Aquilla 21,91,113 114,151, 

154, 163, 164, 165, 166, 243 

J. H. 22 

Pusey 38, 51, 66 

Evaline 147 

Evaline L. 66, 81, 152 

Wm. B. 66 

Alice R. 66 

Anna 44, 58, 64, 66 

Anna H. 56 

Anna C. 59 

v Truman, 43,44, S l ^6>%, 237 v 

257, 258,271, 259, 272. 

Harvey 51 

Margaret 36, 37, 45, 50, 59, 

63, 127. 
Margaret E. 112 

Mary, 7,8, 12, 36,44,45, 5°, 

57,66. 72,91, 113, 114, 122, 

133* J 37, 151, J55. 162, 246. 
Mary A. 37, 109, 115, 116, 

121, 127, 147, 246. 

Mary P. 56, 258 

Mary E. 64, 59, 73 

Mary S. 166 

Mary Jr. 116 

Mary C. 119 

Mary M. 65 

Mary I. 123 

Mary L. 125 

Isaac 36, 88, 90, 91,92,93, 

108, 109, no, in, 113, 116, 

117, 119, 120, 121, 132, 133, 

134, 135. T 3 6 > i37i 243, 2 46 

Isaac Jr. n6 

Isaac P. 116, 119, 125. 129 

Isaac P., Jr. 125 

Isaac T. 123 

Isaac L. 166 

Isaac S. 112 

Warrick Sr. 36, 38, 39, 40, 

43, in, 150. 



Coates, Levi, 36, 43,46, 50, 116, 150 
Richard 36, 44, 46 

W. 115 

George 37, 44, 46, 51, 57, 147 

252. 

Geo. W. 116 

Geo. D. 65 

Geo. D., Jr. 65, 66 

Geo. W. P. 124 

Geo. H. 124 

Geo. S. 146 

George S. 115 

George J. 166 

Joseph 27,39,44, 52, 57, 65, 

254. 

Joseph R. 60, 113, 270 

Minnette 57, 7 2 

Abigail 3 7 , 38, 44, 45, 5°, 

53> 54, 5 8 » 10 9- 

Jacob 37, 109, 247 

Eliza 37,50, 58, 116 

Ellis 40,41, 42, 43, 5 1 

Hartt G. 3 8 > So, 65 

Warrick, Jr. 38, 41, 42, 50, 

5 1 , 52, 53, 59- 
Philena 3 8 > 54 

Lewis 3S, 65, 120, 147 

Elenor 38, 115 

H. G. 38 

Lydia42, 50,92, 117, 252, 254 
Edith 42, 50, 65, 124 

Phebe 43, 55, 56, 92, 115, 

M7, 153, l6o > l6 5> 2 53- 
Pusey 165, 257 

Rebecca 47, 92, 113, 116, 

119, 126, 130, 253. 
Amos 42, 56, 92, 113, 115, 

116, 148. 
Amos A. 113 

Amos W. 148 

James 44, 5 6 , 242 

Ellen S. 44, 57 

Hannah S. 44, 58 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



289 



Coates, Esther 44, 58, 


64, 91, in, 


Coates, Helen M. 64 


113. 




Lafayette 64 


Cherrington 


44, 5 8 > 59 


Ethel 64 


Zilla 46, 92, 11 


6, 117, "9i 


Emma W. 64 


120. 




Emma S. 126, 130 


Phebe N. 


50 


Emma V. 123 


Phebe R. 


119 


Elsie M. 65 


Phebe M. 


65 


H. Orville 65 


Sarah 


91, 119, 151 


Jesse 65,83,92,111,113,124, 


Sarah W. 


50,63 


125, 147. 


Sarah A. 


5i 


Jesse A. 113 


Sarah P. 


125, 126 


Jesse K. 115 


Granville 


50, 258 


H. Bennett 65 


Granville, Jr. 


66 


Annie B. 66 


Howard 


51-65 


Edna D. 66 


Stephen 


5 1 , 65, 252 


Lena 72 


Ruthanna 


51, 52, 56 


Dr. C. 152 


Lydia Irea 


56 


Sidney 90, 109, 120, 246, 247 


Charles 


57, 254 


24S. 


Charles T. 


64,^3, 151 


Rachel 90,109,111,120,121, 


Charles S. 


65, n 3 


125, 164, 165, 166, 230, 244, 


— Charles E. 


116, 124 


245, 246, 247, 251, 252. 


Charles P. 


125 


Rachel D. 124 


Dr. Charlse H. 


124, 125 


Rachel A. 125 


Charles L. 


163 


Ann Eliza 91 


Vi ginia 


57,59 


Ann G. 114, 122 


Leora 


57 


Laura 115, 127, 147, 254 


Cordelia 


57 


Caleb 91, in, 112, 113, 116, 


Wm. L. 


57 


148,151, 247, 250. 


Sarah J. 


56, 60, 114 


Elisha 91, in 


Roland 


57 


Beulah 92, 109, 116, 117, 


Phillip M. 


59 


245, 250 


Caroline 


59 


Grace 92, it 7 , 243, 246, 250 


Henry W. B. 


59 


253- 


Earnest R. 


59 


Grace A. 129 


Lanella M. 


64 


Seymour 92, 115, 116, 117, 


Lydia M. 


64 


119, 120, 137, 13S. 


Mina 


64 


Amy 92, 116, 119, 120 


Jennie E. 


64 


Israel 92, 116, 119, 120, 164 


Norman 


64 


Lindley 92, 119, 120, 131, 138, 


Gladys 


64 


149, 150. 
Ann 92, 112, 164, 242, 243, 


Leroy 


64 


244, 246, 251, 253. 



290 



Index of Names. 



Coates,Ann E. 
Ann D. 
Anna Jr. 
Abner 
Becky 
Sarah B. 
Sarah R. 
Sarah H. 
Sarah E. 
IdaF. 
Ida V. 
Ann L. 
Ann G. 
Edward H. 
Edward H., Jr. 
Elmer R. 
Lewis M. 
Rosella 
Valeria 
Lawrence K. 

Lloyd G. 

Theodore 

Sylvanus 

Emeline 

Hannah B. 

Harriett T. 

Hays C. 

Albert 

Mariah 

Clifford 

Oliver R. 
Edwin O. 

Horace L. 

Ridgeway 

Howard 146, 

Howard H. 

Willy 

Preston 

Preston A. 

Amelia 

Joshua 

Lydian 



113, 116, 123 
126 
92 
96 
110 
250 
in 

in, 176 
112 
122 

112-122 
112 

112-122 
122 
"3 
113 
114 
114 
114 
114 
114 

115, 147 
"5 
"5 
115 
"5 
US 
115 

115. 147 

116 

116 

116 

116, 146, 147 

253, 256, 270 

1 1 6, 146 
116 

119,138 
127 
119 
119 

1 19, 126 



Coates. Deborah 120, 
Simmons 
Kersey 
Comley 
Cullen W. 
Walter 
Cecelia 
Henry R. 
Henry S. 
Isabella V. 
Hellen G. 
Elizabeth G. 
James W. 
Esther V. 
Lucretia 
Rosalent 
Harold P. 
Jos. R. T. 
Harry D. 
Emely 
Florence 
Frank 

Dewees R. 

Leonard R. 

Louise 

Chester A. 

Mabel 

Mabel H. 

Gertrude 

Gertrude P. 

Evangeline 

Lavenia 

Arthur 

Llewellyn 

Miria E. 
i-^Edwin C. 

Bessie 

Elmer R. 

Edward E. 

Lillian 

Lillian P. 

Louis P. 



131, 138, 150 

121, 126, 150 
121, 127, I31 
131, 127 
122 
122 
122 
122, 127 
127 
122 
122 
122 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 

123 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
125 
125 

125, 128 
127 

126, 129 
127 

127, 13° 
127, I3 1 

127 
127 
127 
127 
127 

138, 143, 144 
128 
128 
128 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



291 



Coates, Marian P. 


128 


Coates, Norman B. 


256 


Ray G. 


129 


Frederick W. 


256 


Emert L. 


129 


Paul 


256 


Amelia B. 


129 


Mary B. 


254, 255 


Hayes C. 


M7 


I. Francis 


254, 255 


Alfred 


147 


Edgar 


255 


Leora G. 


147 


Mabel E. 


255 


Elma 


147 


Sir Roger 


263 


Mariah 


147 


Sir John 


263 


Horace L. 


14S 


Alice 


270 


Oliver 


148 


Jos, R. T. 25s, 25s, 259, 270 


Edwin 


150 


271. 




Priscilla 151, 153, 


154, 163, 


Clara 


254 


164, 177, 250. 




Cook, Ruthanna 


51 


Priscilla H. 


162 


William 


51 


Asa 


247 


Susanna 


51 


Eli 


247 


Julia A. 


53 


Cyrus 151 


, 162, 253 


Allen 


53 


Cyrus L. 


166 


Rachel H. 


53 


Mahlon 


154 


Franklin 


53 


Hannah L. 


163 


Philena P. 


53 


Keziah 242, 


243, 2 44 


Clarkson 


53 


Abnor 


2 "n2 


Eliza L. 


53 


Tacy 


251 


Reuben 


53 


Ezra 


2 C2 


Cooke, Edward 


9 


Cyrus 


252 






Milton 


252 


Cope, Gilbert 


10 


Thomas (Coats) 7 


8, 12, 15 


Charity 


no 


Peter 


15 
15 


Sarah 


120 


Thomas 


Elizabeth 


120 


Louise 


15 


Oliver 


120 


Argyll 


15 


Ezra 


121 


Joseph, M. D. 


50 


Jonathan 


250 


John 


175-177 


Cope & Futhy 


156 


Joseph P. 


I76 


Carr, Geo. B. 


14 


Chelkley 


253, 254 


Chemsted, Win. 


29 


Annie 
Stalker 
Annie M. 
Janette W. 


2 53, 254 
253 
254 
254 


Cherrington, Margaret 
Thomas 
Rachel (Lee) 
Mary 


33, 44, 45 

44, 45, 46 

44, 45, 46 

46 


Irene 


255 


John 


46 


Frederick 


255 


Wm. 


46 



292 



Index of Navies. 



Crosby D. 


40 


Christman, Isaac 


46 


Camn, Henry 


35 


Hannah 


46 


Rebecca 


35 


Cutler, Alban 


53,59 


Carrigan, Jane 


35 


Jesse 


59 


Crisswell, Margaret 


44 


Mary (Stubbs) 


59 


Nathan 


44 


Theodore P. 


59 


Nora 


259» 2 7o 


Horace G. 


59, 74 


Mary 


259, 270 


Cassandra 


59, 74 


Cadwallader, Reese 


95 


Joseph 


74 


Caldwell, Alice B. 


53 


Dorothy 


74 


Crandall, Henry 


70 


Jennette 


74 


Clicker, Rev. 


76 


Ernest 


74 


Clark, John 


39 


Helen 


74 


Sarah 


57 


Ralph 


74 


Wm. R. 


237, 239, 240 


M. Ella 


74 


Samaria 


23S 


Chambers, May 


64 


Geo. P. 


239 


Calver, Wm. 


66 


Chas. B. 


240 


Cooper, Harry 


57.72 


Theodore 


240 


Ray 


57 


Frances 


240 


Herbert 


57 


Elizabeth 


240 


Burleigh 


57 


Tacy E. 


240 


Wm. P. 


57 


Mary C. 


240 


Saml. L. 


57 


Laura 


240 


Joseph E. 


57,77 


Geo. M. 


240 


Mary L. 


57, 77 


Robt. 


240 


Lorena 


57,77 


Frank W. 


240 


Sarah 


57 


Horace 


240 


G. W. 


76 


Mabel 


240 


Mabel A. 


77 


Florence 


240 


Lucy P. 


77 


Lena 


240 


Geo. A. S. 


77 


Stephen H. 


240 


James, 96, 99, 104, 


105, 108 


Cox 


120 


Cloud, Henry 


S3 


Elizabeth 


164 


Joseph 


79 


Sarah 


164 


Elizabeth E. 


79 


Joseph 


164 


Geo. W. 


79 


Daniel 


46 


Clarence T. 


79 


Mary 


89 


Millie 0. 


79 


Robert 


89 


William 


79 


Deborah 


89 


Myrtle E. 


79 


Laurence 

Jacob 

Jane 


89 
89 


Leona D. 
Philena 


79 
79 


Rebekah 


89 


Frank S. 


80 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



293 



Cloud, Jesse R. 

Adella B. 

Pauline 
Caughey, Chas. K. 

Elizabeth K. 

Chas. T. 
Clare, Esther 
Coppuck, Melum M. 
Catel, Jones 
Cornplanter 
Cutle John 
Cock, John 
Cattell, David 

Elizabeth 

Jonas 
Colgan, Grace 

Wm. 

Hannah 

Zilla 

John 

Wm. M. 
Conard, Alfred F. 

Milton E. 

Elizabeth H. 

Alice M. 

Edward B. 

Jos. 

Eliza 

Winfield W. 

Eliza C. 

Juanita 

Ella P. 
Childs, AbeliL. 

Henry P. 

Elizabeth 
Call, Grace 
Chandler, Sarah W. 

John 
Maria 
Campbell, John G. 

Anna 

Mary 



80 
80 
80 
76 
76 
76 

173 
170 

95 

99, 103, 104 

105 

114 

»5 
"5 
"5 
116 
116 
117 
117 
117 

117 
118 
119 
119 
119 
175 
J 75 
175 
175 
175 
175 
271, 273 
119 
119 

239 
126 

127 
127 
127 
179 
179 
179 



Campbell, Francis J. 


179 


Jesse A. 


179 


Elizabeth 


179 


Rebecca 


i79 


James 


179 


Henry 


179 


Anna E. 


179 


Andrew 


i7 9 


Clive, Francis 


129 


Seyman 


129 


Francis M. 


129 


Helen C. 


129 


Arthur S. 


129 


Coho, Herbert B, 


13c 


Gertrude B. 


130 


Helen 


130 


Cowgill, Wm. 


161, 162 


Elizabeth 


161 


Eliza 


161, l62 


Hannah 


162 


Catharine A. 


162, 174 


Hannah M. 


162, 174 


Moses E. 


162 


Craft, Margaret 


240 


Cobourn, Phebe 


162 


Connade, Joseph 


164 


Conrade, Jos. 


165 


Christman, Geo. 


172 


Sophia 


172 


Priscilla 


172 


Clinton, Geo. 


224 


Crawford, Annie E. 


256 


John 


256 


Martha 


256 


D 




de Cote 


7 


de Coates, William 


7, 14 


Dyer, Henry 


22 


Mary C. 


22 


Elizabeth C. 


22 


Wm. P. 


22 



294 



Index of Names. 



Dalton, Annie 


70 


Dicks, Sarah 


35 


Peter 


35 


Deeble, Gulielma 


35 


Jane 


35 


George 


35 


Deaver, Louella 


74 


Darlington, George 


53,57 


Lydia 


56 


Richard 


56 


Hannah 


3S 


s. p. 


4i 


Elenor 


41, 67 


Susanna P. 


112 


Eliza 


5°,5i 


Sarah M. 


67 


Susanna R. 


67 


Mary J. 


68 


George W. 


68 


Emma V. 


68 


Susan M. 


68 


G. Barclay 


68 


Ellis P. 


68 


Helen 


68 


E. Pierce 


68 


Richard 


US 


Rachel 


"5 


Mary 


123 


Day, Matthew 


57 


Minervia E. 


57 


Emily C. 


57 


Nathan A. 


57 


Anna P. 


57 


Laurence 


58 


Truman C. 


58 


Phebe M. 


58 


Amanda 


58 


Duphorn, Bertha 


76 


Dawney, Llwellyn 


19 


David 


19,28 


Jemima 


27 


Martha 


35 


David W. 


59 


Clarence 


59 



Dull, Mary E, 


113 


Sarah 


122 


Davis, Dorothy 


71 


William 71, 166, 


184, 185 


Joseph 


71, 169 


Susanna 


17 


Col. 


154 


Israel 


164 


Theophilue 


164-165 


Edward 


165 


John 


165, 170 


Zachariah 


165 


Sarah 


166 


Wm. S. 


166 


Priscilla 


166 


Mary 


167 


Hannah 


167 


Susanna 


167 


Sarah L. 


168 


Elenor 


168, 169 


Sarah S. 


169 


Harry 


186 


Helen 


186 


Norman 


186 


Wm. E. 


184 


Caroline 


184 


Mary H. 


184 


Susan 


184 


Dorithea 


184 


Ellen 


1S4, 185 


Louisa 


185 


Harry 


185 


Joseph W. 


185 


Fred 


180 


Douglass, Mary B. 


125 


Dickinson, John 


137 


Dunkin, Aaron 


164 


Sarah 


164 


Susanna 


164 


Dowdall, Israel 


164 


Dorsey, Elizabeth 


167 


Dallis, Chas. 


167 


Davidson, Florence A. 


168 



Genealogy of the Coates Family, 



295 



Dennis, Isaac 




l 73 


Evans, Elmira H. 


178 


Jacob F. 




173 


Horatio M. 


178 


Rettie 0. 




173 


Moses L. C. 


178 


Mary C. 




173 


Sophia 


178 


Doughman, Gidean R 




182 


Francis E. 


178 


Jacob 




182 


Lewis J. 


178 


Gulielma 




182 


Moses C. 


179 


Geo. W. 




182 


Henry H. 


*79 


Walter G. 




182 


Clarence 


179 


Judy 




182 


Frank 


179 


Gidean 




182 


Ethel M. 


179 


Dudley 




182 


Hazel 


*79 


Esther 




182 


Frank W. 


179 


Ross L. 




182 


Judson W. 


179 


Dalney E. 




182 


Josephine J. 


179 


Zela 




182 


Wm.H. 


180 


Dickey, Deliah A. 




182 


Cordelia 


180 


DeHaven, John 




2 55 


Augusta 


180 


Mary 




255 


Emma B. 


180 


Elizabeth 




255 


Emilie W. 


1 So 


William 




2 55 


Jonathan 


1 So 


Clara 




255 


Harry 


180 


Dailey, Nellie 




255 


Emma 


180 


E 






Lillie 


180 






Mary 


180 


Eston, Anthony 




22 


Blair 


1 80 


Evans, Saml. 




37 


Ernest 


180 


John 




46 


Lynn 


1 So 


Jane 


46, 


238 


Stella 


180 


Owen 




117 


Viola 


180 


Mary 


U7 


180 


Catharine 


1 So 


Beulah 




117 


Ella W. 


180 


Edwin 




"7 


Rebecca 


180 


William 




117 


Moses L. 


180 


Elizabeth 


153, i79 


1 S3 


Josiah M. 


180 


Jonathan 163, 


164, 165, 


177, 


Henry H. 


180 


183. 






Olive H. 


180 


Sarah 




163 


Geo. W, 


180 


Priscilla 


163 


183 


Wm. M. 


1 80 


Evans 


165 


, *77 


Bonnie E. B. 


180 


Josiah 


164, 177 


,180 


Grover C. 


180 


Geo. H. 


177 


,178 


Frederick K. 


180 


Leander R 




178 


Austin P. 


180 



296 



Index of Names. 



Evans, Elizabeth C. 

Wm. E. 

Harry R. 

Geo. G. 

Esther E. 

Soloman M. 

Earl P. 

Earl P. 

Chas. M. 

Leonard 

Davis H. 

Millard J. 

Helen E. 

Ruth J. 

Miriam 

David S. 

Agnes M. 

Flora 

John W. 

Josiah M. 

Dora A. 

Nellie E. 

Annie 

Sarah 
Emig, Jonathan 

Jonathan Jr. 

Hiram 

Priscilla 

Lucretia 

George 

Geo. W. 

Ella 

Forest 

Myrtle 

Wilson 

Elizabeth 

Ruth 

Howe 

John 

Alfred 

Maggie 

Eva 



1 80 


Maud 


180 


180 


Bertha 


180 


180 


Cordie E. 


180 


180 


Edge, John 


33 


180 


Jacob 


33 


180 


Ellmaker, Lucy H, 


62 


180 


Esaius E. 


62 


180 


Sarah W. 


62 


180 


Alfred 


62 


180 


Edgar B. 


62 


1 So 


Mary A. 


62 


180 


Flora 


62, 78 


1 So 


Nathaniel 


62,78 


180 


Sarah 


62, 79 


180 


Emmett L. 


62 


180 


Cecelia 


78 


180 


Hannah 


78 


180 


John W. 


7S 


180 


Evason, Phebe 


186 


l8l 


Reece 


186 


181 


Hannah 


186 


181 


Edders, Thos. 


193 


1S1 


Eastburn, Estella 


64 


181 


Rachel 


244 


179 


Engle, 


7i 


179 


Catharine 


167, 184 


179 


Joseph 


167, 184 


179 


Susan H. 


167, 184 


i79 


Ector, Hannah G. 


7-5 


i79 


Thomas 


75 


179 


Henrietta 


75 


i7 9 


Eppleshimer, Frederick 


77 


179 


Edward 


77 


179 


John F. 


77 


179 


Eckman, Ella M. 


171 


179 


Joseph 


171 


179 


Mary A. 


171 


179 


Essex, James 


172 


180 


Lane 


172 


180 


Echus, Sarah T. 


78 


180 


Virgil T. 


78 


180 


Jane P. 


78 



Genealogy of the Co cites Family. 



297 



Ewing, Martha A. 


79 


Thomas 


79 


Margaret 


79, n8 


Freda M. 


79 


William, M.D. 


uS 


Elton, Anthony 


81,82 


Jane 


81,82 


Ellis, William 


107 


Mercy 


107 


Earl, Catharine A. 


128 


Echman, Ella K. 


69 


Epright, Frances 


254 


Froyer, Harry 


70 


Catharine 


70 


James B. 


70 


Catharine C. 


70 


Fox, Esther J. 


10 


John 


34 


Ellen M. 


60 


Gi orge 


60 


Sarah 


60 


William S. 


183 


Charles L. 


1S3 


Esther 


i§3 


Mary M. 


183 


John F. 


i33 


Erie E. 


183 


Fulton, Ambrose 


33> 84 


James 


149 


Elizabeth 


254 


, James 


2 54 


Ann P. 


2 54 


Free, Rachel 


37 


Freeman, Mabel 


183 


Laura J. 


183 


Elizabeth 


183 


Anabel 


'S 3 


Fay 


183 


Sarah E. 


^3 


Fry, Charlotte 


64 


Fogg, Walter 


73 


Franklin, Chas. 


75 



Fleming, Jas. 

William 

John 
Forsythe, Chas. 

Albert 

Sarah 

Wm. L. 

Wm. B. 
Fish, Stephen 
Frees, Ada F. 
Ferguson, Stella 

Mary 
Furniss, Gardner 
Folk, Rachel 
Fredd, John T. 
Firth, Eva F. 
Freer, Ada S. 
Foster, Geo. 
Fussell, Solomon 
Frances, Ann 
Farwell, Roland G. 

James 

Nora 

Thornton D. 

Richard O. 

James G. 

Norma E. 

John F. 

Virginia T. 
Fell, Sophia 

Barclay 

Hannah 

Phineas 

Thomas 

Grace 

David 
Glenn, Thomas 

Margaret 

Thomas Glenn 

Alexander H. 

Marian 

Margerie 

Winnifred 



41 

41 
41 
117 

117 
117 

n7 
117 
121 
116 
126 
12S 

51 
24S 

58 

129 

148 

244 

164 

,65 

1S2 

182 

182 

182 

182 

182 

182 

182 

1S2 

80 

80 

80 

251 

251 

251 

251 

15 

15 

'5 

'5 

'5 

15 

15 



298 



Index of Names. 



Gibson, Anna W. 


63 


Gilbert, Mary 


in 


Grubb, J. Earnest 


17 


John 


in 


Griffith, Jos. 


29 


Ann 


in 


Letitia 


165 


Rachel 


in 


Elizabeth 


165 


Isaac 


in, 113 


Diadema 


165 


Elizabeth 11 1, 112, 113 


John P. 


167 


Benjamin 


in 


William 


167 


Thomas 


in 


Percy 


167 


Gilman, John 


114 


Ellen 


167 


Gillespie, Cornelia 


117 


Joseph 


167 


Gawthrop, Elizabeth 


119 


James 


167 


Ruth 


125 


Deidomia 


246 


Galbreath, Hannah 


121 


Gladden, Joseph 


33, 35, 36 


Gaskill, Mary P. 


123 


Samuel 


36 


Greenleaf, Catherine 


126 


Susanna 


36 


Charles 


126 


Emma 


37 


Grimmell, Annie D. 


127 


Sarah 


37 


Zachariah 


127 


Mattson 


37 


Margaret 


127 


Coates 


37 


Gettes, Geo. W. 


129 


Hannah 


37 


Grumbine, Saml. 


130 


Levi 


37 


Agnes E. 


130 


James 


'37 


Lucy 


!3° 


Guy, Katharine 


63 


Gass, Benjamin 


57 


Gehrty, Mary 


63 


Isaac 


119, 129 


Gifford, Saml. 


136 


Florien P. 


129 


Gale, Chas. 


40 


Charles 


129 


Gill, Lydia A. 


64 


Preston F. 


129 


Robinson 


64 


Sherlock 


129 


Mary R. 


64 


Preston 


129 


Gray, Ezra 


55 


Mary A. 


129 


Enoch 


55»7i 


Bertie L. 


129 


Sarah 


55 


Graham, Addie 


124 


Mary A. 


55, 7i 


Gibbons, Daniel 


149 


Enoch C. 


55,71 


Garrison, William L. 


150 


Lucre ti a 


55,7i 


Gates, Genl. 


154, 157 


Chas. B. 


71 


George, Mary 


162 


Louisa S. 


7 1 


Grewell, Rebecca 


167 


Elsie 


7i 


Garby, Kate 


173 


William 


171 


Goodlander, Geo. B. 


178 


Sarah 


179 


Gailer, Lewis C. 


178 


Gilleth, John A. 


71 


Greene, Sarah M. 


179 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



299 



Grover, Thomas 

Thos, J. 

Eliza 

Lidie 

Margaret 

John H. 

Melissa B. 

Olivia P. 

Mary E. 

Robert D. 
Gould, M. T. C. 
Gibson, James 

Sarah 

Frances 
Garretson, Isaac 

Eliza 

Emelie 

David 

Eli 

Rachel 
Guin, James 
Guthery, Saml. 

Albert 
Glover, William 

Thomas 

Mary 

Eliza 

H 

Hambleton, John 

Samuel 

Sarah 

Theodore P. 
Hadley, Grier 
Hoopes, Abigail 
Humphery, David 
Haycock, Saml. 

Joseph 
Hickman, Frank 

William E. 

Pennell 

Ethel 



173 


Hickman, Grace 


67 


J 73 


Myrtle 


67 


*73 


Frances 


71 


*73 


Walter B. 


7i 


173 


Carrol G. 


71 


173 


Mary B. 


7i 


"73 


Husted, S. Irving 


65 


173 


Elva 


65 


173 


Ruth C. 


65 


178 


Harold 


65 


202 


Louis C. 


65 


205 


Hoopes, A. 


41 


205 


Elenor 


41, 42 


205 


Frances P. 


54, 70 


249 


Ellen 


54 


249 


Mary J. 


54,69 


249 


Morton 


54,69 


249 


Henry 


54, 69, 70 


249 


Warrick 


54,70 


249 


Sarah S. 


54,70 


245 


William 


54 


253 


Abigail 


54 


2 53 


Laura 


69 


2 53 


Cyrus 


69 


2 53 


Geo. B. 


69 


253 


Nina D. 


69 


2 53 


Linda M. 


70 




Marian G. 


70 




John D. 


70 


2 54 


Chas. P. 


70 


254 


Mary 


70 


254 


Pauline 


70 


254 


Helen 


70 


255 


Abbie S. 


70 


27l 


Sidney 


70 


19 


Priscilla 


118 


21 


Edward 


202 


169 


C. 


236 


55 


Haines, Timothy 


S3 


67 


Timothy J. 


53 


67 


Mark 


53 


67 


Mercy C. 


53 



300 



Index of Names. 



Haines, Sarah T. 


53 


Hopkins, Elizabeth J. 




63 


Henry 


7i 


John H. 




63 


George 


7* 


Wm. G. 




63 


Hariett 


7i 


Roger B. 




63 


Geo. D. 


7i 


Howe, Catharine 


109, 246, 


247 


Atlantic 


"5 


Hugh, Daniel 




165 


Elisha 


JI 5 


Hobson, Moses 




165 


Hutton, Rachel 


53 


Phebe 




165 


Hatton, Wm, Jr. 


53 


Helps, Eliza 




166 


Owen 


73 


H annum, Frank 




67 


Joanna 


73 


Bertha 




67 


Caroline 


73 


Earl 




67 


Hunsberger, John 


58 


Mary 




67 


Oscar 


58 


Saml. P. 




67 


Zell C. 


58 


J. Pewnell 




67 


Harris, Smith 


59 


Esther P. 




67 


Wenona 


60, 74 


Elsie 




67 


Ernistine 


60, 75 


Georgetta 




67 


Irene 


60, 75 


D. Frederick 




67 


Scribe 


60 


Evalena 




112 


Anna 


60 


Hellman, John V. 




74 


Paul C. 


60 


Pauline S. 




74 


Helen C. 


60 


Hanna, Frank C. 




80 


Helen E. 


75 


Wm. H. 




80 


Arthur N. 


75 


Sarah 




80 


Sarah C. 


75 


Jos. W. 




80 


Roy Wm. 


75 


Mary 




80 


Chas. L. 


75 


Benjamin 




121 


Pauline 


75 


Markus A. 




121 


Margaret 


75 


Harlow, Hannah 




113 


Elenor 


75 


Halftown 




99 


Bernice 


75 


Hughes, Ellis 


107, 


108 


John 


192 


Mark 108 


117, 118, 


119 


Hawley, Jos. W. 


64 


Lydia 


116, 117, 


118 


Hess, Mary E. 


62 


Samuel 


"7i 


118 


Hopkins, Gerard T. 


63 


Margaret 




117 


Frances N. 


63 


Thomas 


117, 


125 


Nevin M. 


63 


Beulah 


117, 


125 


Annie K. 


63 


Elizabeth 




117 


Francis G. 


63 


Hannah 


H7, 


118 


Alfred T. 


63 


Rebecca 




118 


Anna R. 


63 


Mary 


"7, 


118 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



301 



Hughes, Alice 


118 


Harper, Win. P. 


!3° 


Margaretta 


118 


John 


130 


William 


nS 


Mary 


130 


Geo. S. 


ITS 


Florence C. 


130 


Chas. C. 


nS 


Paul C. 


130 


Laura 


nS 


Evangeline 


130 


Chas. R. 


118 


Hale, Cordelia 


147 


Annie A. 


119 


Hutchinson, Priscilla 


J 53 


Hormann, Amelia 


in 


John 


154, 155 


Agust 


112 


Sarah 


*53 


Josephine 


112 


Haley, Joel 


173 


Hayes, J. Barton 


117 


Henrietta 


i73 


Caroline 


117 


Hunsiker, Nellie 


175 


Lydia E. 


117 


Harley, Annie 


178 


Mordecai 


149 


Haycock, Jos. 


171 


Lucretia 


184 


Elizabeth 


171 


Catharine 


184 


Annie 


171 


Harvey, John D. 


118 


Esther 


171 


Samuel 


118 


Fannie 


171 


Lydia 


118 


Jos. W. 


171 


Mary 


118 


Mary B. 


171 


Mary A. 


118 


Priscilla W. 


171 


Hummel, James 


179 


Edmond R. 


171 


Hoover, Chas. C. 


181 


B. F. 


J 75 


Alice C. 


181 


Thos. E. 


175 


Grace H. 


181 


Hannah 


l 7S 


Carl L. 


181 


Amelia 


175 


Lenore M. 


118 


Ellen 


i7 5 


Vera G. 


181 


Howard, Henry 


35 


Pauline M. 


181 


Hannah 


35 


Clara M. 


181 


Huston, John 


33 


Clara E. 


181 


Hicks, Amelia 


240 


Edson J. 


182 


Stephen 


240 


Margarite R. 


182 


Hannah 


240 


Van Carl 


182 


Hillis, Robert 


46 


Joseph 


183 


Hayward, Wm. Jr. 


242, 243, 244 


Thomas 
Rebecca 


183 
183 


Harlan, Susanna 


36 


High, Elizabeth 


165 


Hartt, Thos. 


84, 85, 86 


Heise, Mary J. 
Sarah A. 


180 
180 


Hatfield, J. Gilbert 


88 , 135, i39 


Howell, R. 


124 


Samuel 


138 


Sarah 


236 


Horner, Abbie 


257 



302 



Index of Names. 



Hall, Isaac 


42,43 


Jones, Arthur 


25 


Cordelia 


116 


Robert 


26 


Emma 


119 


Evan 


26 


Jennie 


124 


John 88, 132, 133, 


i34, 135, 


Christian 


249 


136. 




Hirst, Edward 


77 


Samuel 


109 


Earl 


77 


Susan A. 


US 


Hanks, Mattie 


239 


Esther 


136 


Hazard, Rachel E. 


124 


Jenkin 


i37 


Hudson, Henry 


227 


Nathan 


137 


Harrison, Mary 


92 


Benjamin 


149 


Deborah 


249 


Mary 


165 


Hossack, Daniel 


224 


Jackson, Isaac 


57 


Hartshorn, Hugh 


99 


Leora 


57,72 


Harman, Wm. 


185 


William 


57 


Edwin 


185 


David W. 


69 


Harrett, John 


105 


Elizabeth 


69 


Holmes, Isabell 


185 


Lindley D. 


69 


Samuel 


185 


John 


108 


Catharine 


185 


Lydia 


119 






Halladay 


99, 104 


i 




Samuel 


95 






Emeline 


126 


Irwin, Wm. 
Irvin, James 
Sarah 


37 
172 
172 

172 

172 


Jebb, Charlotte 
Johnson, Geo. B. 


64 
78 


Phebe 
Dunton 


Wm. F. 
Samuel 


183 
183 


William 


172 


Sarah A. 


183 


John 

Joseph 

Mary 

Helen 

Alfred 


172 
172 
172 
172 
172 


Jencks, Hugh J., M.D. 

Anna 
Jarvis, Lucretia 

Florence 
Jacobs, Isaac 


60 

60 

129 

123 
164 


Everett 


172 


Jesse 


164, 165 


Indian John 
Iddings, Hannah 


99 
109 


Phebe 

William 

Israel 


164 

165 
165 


J 




Elizabeth 


165 




John 


165 


Jackson, Philena, 


257, 258, 271 


Mary 


165 


Jenckes, Anna H. 


270, 272 


Howard 


239 


Jaques, Beulah 


9 


Jessop, Jonathan 


247 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



303 



K 



Kinsey, Chas. C. 


53 


Kinslow, Saml. 


53 


Kirk, Elizabeth 


36, 89, 92 


Caleb 36, 39, 92 


>93>i36, 137, 


248, 249. 




John 


53 


Deborah 


53 


Mary 


53 


Erastus 


"5 


Joseph 


249 


Nathan 


249 


Elisha 


249 


Beulah 


249 


Susan 


249 


Jesse 


249 


Sarah 


250 


Edith 


249 


Timothy 


249 


Kersey, Jesse 109, 


no, in, 113 


William 


109 


Hannah 


109, 121 


Joseph 


109, no 


Lydia 


109 


Mary 


109 


Rachel 


109 


Sarah 


109 


Jesse Jr. 


109 


Elizabeth 


no, in, 113 


Ann 


no 


Esther E. 


no 


Knight, Sarah Ann 


5 8 > 59 


Moses 


58 


Rhoda 


58 


Kreider, Mary 


264 


Kent, Daniel 


42,43 


Willis 


61 


Willis H. 


61 


Sarah M. 


62 


Janette 


62 


Raymond 


62 



Kent, Mahlon, Jr. 62 

Mary 62 

Mahlon B. 69 

Keech, Davis 65 

Elizabeth 65 

Jacob 65 

Rebecca 65 

Kissin, Mary 127 

Kimber, Anna 149 

Emma 231 

Katar, Susan 168 

Keaton, Wm. 169 

King, Amos 53 

Horace 64 

Nina 64 

Hazel 64 

Frank 64 

Samuel A. 248 

Elmer 248 

Erastus 248 

Aquilla 248 

Josiah 248 

Eli 248 

Henry 248, 249 

Elwood 249 

Charles 249 

Knox, Grace 243 



Lackey, James 12 

Longstreth, Benj. 20, 164, 251 

Hannah 21, 163, 164 

John 22, 163, 164, 165, 251 



Sarah 


164, 165 


William 


164 


Mary 


164, 165 


Ann 


164, 241 


Joseph 


164 


Nancy 


165 


Bartholomew 


242, 250, 251 


Elizabeth 


251 


Isaac 


251 



304 



Index of Names. 



Lane, Edward 

Catharine 

Samuel 

Sarah 

Priscilla 

Mary 

Phebe 

Eliza A. 
Lloyd, David 
Llewellyn, David 
Lover, Saml. 

Mary 
Landon, Bird 

Seaton 
Lynch, P. C. 

J., Jr. 

James 

Mary (Hoy) 

Philena 

Anna M. 54, 

Ella W. 

Susan 

Laura 
Locke, Erie 

Charles 

Hannah R. 

Chas. E. 

Campbell 

Edith 

Seymour 

Preston E. 

Willie M. B. 
Lewis, Chas. 

Curtis 

Phineas 

John 

Grace 

Thomas 
Lamborn, George L. 

Smedley 
Margaret 

Margaret C. 

Mary M. 



20, 160, 173 

116 

160, 164 

160, 172, 173 

160, 172 

160, 172 

164, 165, 173 

173 
21 

26 

40 

128 

73 

73 

41,42 

41,42 

54, 270 

54 

54 

258, 271, 272 

54, 70 

54, 70 

54,7i 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
125 
126 
126 

53 

86 

87 

164 

164 

164 

56,63 

63 

63 

63 

63 



Lamborne,Priscilla 
Anna M. 
Chas. Linnaeus 
Lucretia M. 
Lillian 
Elwood 
Edgar 
Gertrude 
Ruthanna H. 
Helen 
Herbert S. 
Alva L. 
Esther E. 
Annie M. 
Ella 
John 
Thomas 
Beulah 
William 
Edith 
Sarah 
Katharine 
Chas. C. 
Mabel L. 
Lawton 
Chas. F. 
Phebe H. 
Lewis G. 
Marshall 
Ester 

Leondor C. 
Elnora E. 
Elizabeth R. 
Wm. K. 
Ethel 
Benj. 

Margarete 
Anna 
Elizabeth 
Roma R. 
Linnarus 



63 

63, 213, 256 

63, 79 

63>79 
64 

73 

75 

75 

75 

79 

79 

79 

79 

63, 79, 118 

118 

118 

118 

11S 

118, 256, 270 

118 

118 

118 

118,256 

118 

118 

118 

118 

255 

255 

255 

255 

213,256 

255 
255> 2 5 6 
256 
256 
256 
256 
256 
256 
258 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



305 



Linvill, Sylvester 
Asahel W. 
Aquilla 
Anna 
Lucy A. 
Clement H. 
Arthur 
Margaret 
Laura 
Sarah 
Alice R. 
Arthur W. 
Aquilla J. 
Jane E. 
Sophia 
Walker 
Marian 
Sarah H. 
Leeds, Alfred 
Lavvton, Mary C. 
Lamb, Hanah G. 
Lafayette, Genl. 
Locke, Erie 
Lookings, Martha 
Lightfoot, Wm. 

Mary 
Lee, Mordecai, Jr. 
Enos 
Ann 
Amos 
Samuel 
Elenor 
Sarah 
Ellis 
Mary P. 
John 

Elizabeth 
Ruth 
Charles 
Jeremiah 
Anthony 
Samuel, Jr. 



61 


Litzenburg, Geo. 


245 


61, 77 


Mary A. 


245 


61 


Jacob 


2 45 


61 


Isaac 


2 45 


6i,77 






61 


M 




61 
61 
61 


Myers, Albert Cook 


10 


Matlock, Chalkley 


10 


61 


McCalvey, Mary 


10, 120 




Geo. N. 


126 


77 


Irene M. 


126 


77 
77 
78 
78 
78 
7S 
78 


McVeaugh, Rebecca 


164 


McCanna, Wm. 


33.84 


Mclilesing, Albina 


172 


Mitchell, Catherine 


15 


Charles 


117 


Moon, Alfred 


117 


/ ^ 


McLain, Geo. 


118 


118 
118 


Mabel 


118 




Leona 


118 


169 
120 


Malcomson, Robt. 


13 


Morris, Anthony 23, 


24, 81,82, 83 


165 
164 

164 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 
46 


Emma S. 


112 


Anthony, Jr. 


136 


Morgan, John 


25 


Mines, Louisa A. 


179 


Moyer, Jas. 


180 


Rebecca 


180 


Mumper, Annie 


180 


Miles, Lucretia 


180 


Maule, Walter W. 


256 


46 


Comley 


256 


46 


Susan 


256 


46 


Ebenezer 


55 


46, 162 


Elizabeth S. 


237 


46 


Miller, Sarah 


32, 33> 34 


46 


Henry 


22,33-34,37 


46 


Geo. 


34,35 


46 


Dorothy D. 


35 


46 


John 


35 


46 


Elizabeth 


35 



306 



Index of Names. 



Miller, Warrick 


84, 85, 


136, 


137 


McDowell, 


178 


Robert 


87, 


88, 


137, 


138 


Martin, Saml. P. 


66, 80 


Caroline 








119 


Rebecca W. 


68 


Mary 








167 


Thomas 


68,80 


Grace 








165 


Hannah 


68 


Metzler, Carrie 








57 


Elizabeth 


80 


Kate 








58 


Charles W. 


So 


Mendenhall, Susanna 




28, 


255 


Harold T. 


So 


Priscilla 






28, 


236 


Elena S. 


80 


Moses 


28, 


109, 


236, 


237 


Ernest W. 


So 


Lydia 




36 


,92, 


109 


Miriam 


So 


Elizabeth 3] 


,83, 


236, 


238, 


251 


Anna M. 


80 


Aaron 


37 


,88, 


236, 


237 


George 


109 


Rose 






87,89 


Frank 


125 


Jonathan 




90 


,92, 


236 


McElhaney, Anna B. 


65 


Christian 








109 


Moore, Lydia A. 


50 


Joshua 






109, 


120 


Thomas 


58 


John 


1511 


236, 


237, 


238 


Matilda 


53 


Saml. 








236 


Elmira 


58,73 


Cyrus 








237 


Cornelia 


53,73 


Geo., M. D. 








237 


Alonza 


58 


Chas 








237 


Flora 


53 


Lawrence 








237 


Clarence 


72 


Emma 








237 


Edwin L. 


78 


Jesse 








238 


E. Lawton 


73 


Harrison 








238 


Anna 


7^ 


Anna 








238 


Edith T. 


73 


May 








238 


Sarah 


ii5 


Wm. 








239 


Joshua 


116, 119, 120 


Marsh, Anna 








37 


Joseph 


116, 121 


Gravenor 








in 


Jane 


116, 117 


Margaret 








249 


Diannah 


116 


John 








249 


William 


116 


Malin, Randal 








33 


Hannah 117, 


125, 161, 164, 


William 






33,35 


165, 181,183. 




Susanna 








35 


Isaac 


117, 125 


Alice 








35 


Beulah 


120 


McWilliams, Sarah 






37 


Rachel 


120 


Matthews, Thos. 


R. 






5o 


Jas. M. 


i35 


Maria 








248 


Amy 


135 


Marlet, G. 








198 


Mordecai 


161 


Montgomery, I. C 








224 


Elizabeth 


161, 182 



Genealogy of the Co ales Family. 



307 



Moore, Eliza 


164 


Mitchener, Francis Le Roy 126 


Francis 


181 


Marion 


126 


Jane 


181 


Willie L. 


126 


Alice 


1S1 


Pierce P. 


126 


Jeramiah 


1S1, 183 


McCullough, Mary 


62 


James 


181 


Stewart 


62 


Lydia 


181, 1S3 


Margaret 


62 


Priscilla 


1S1 


Molroney, Jos. 


75 


Abraham 


1 81 


Pauline 


75 


Sarah A. 


181 


Margaret 


75 


Margaret 


1S2 


Marshall, Alfred 


T27 


Jacob 


182 


Clarence M. 


128 


Darwin 


125 


Frederick W. 


128 


Lindley 


125 


Richard 


128 


Ruth 


125 


Mifflin, Genl. 


! 54 


Bessie 


125 


Morrison, Mary 


J 55 


Haldine 


125 


McVey, Sarah 


86 


Channing 


125 


McDermit, Ada 


77 


Susan S. 


I3 3 


Musgrave, Hannah 


90, 91 


Esther J. 


*3 


Thos. 


90 


Anna 


256 


Morton, Dr. Chas. J. 


123 


Wm. J. 


254 


John 


123 


McCosh, Geo. G. 


59 


Dr. Rush K. 


123 


Nettie H. 


59 


Mary W. 


128 


Harry T. 


59 


Chas. L. 


12 3 


Maccumber, Caleb 


107 


Dr. Howard 


123 


Myerson, Jos. 


114 


Meridith, Elmer 


167 


Monroe, Francis A. 


63 


McCandless, Gen. 


124 


MacCallum, Christian 


67 


Murin, Dolie 


124 


Michener, Lukins 


120 


Merritt, Frank 


125 


Frank 


120 


McNeil, Effie M. 


255 


Mary 


120 


John 


255 


Irene 


120 


Rebecca 


255 


Mitchener, Jacob L. 


126 


Mickle, Susanna 


2 53 


Mary A. 


126 


John 


253 


Judkins P. 


126 


Mills, Phebe A. 


2 54 


Frank B. 


126 


Mather, Richard 


123 


Irene 


126 


Lewis M. 


123 


Jeanne A. 


126 


Benj. F. 


123 


Margaret 


126 


Charles E. 


123,127 


Elizabeth 


126 


Florence V. 


123, 128 


Percy S. 


126 


Irene A, 


123, 128 



308 



Index of Names. 



Mather, Elenor 


123 


Pennepacker, Eliah 


173 


Arthur G. 


128 


Matthias 


173 


Josephine C. 


128 


Rebecca 


173 


Victor C. 


128 


Elijah 


177, 233, 234 


Dorothy 


128 


Mary A. 


192, 193 


Gilbert 


128 


Elijah 


192, 230 


N 




Sarah W. 


230* 234 




Priest. Lidie O. 


10, 158, 173 


Nutt, Saml. 


20 


Henry S. 


!73 


Needles, John 


35 


Price, Rebecca L. 


10, 173 


Sarah 


247 


Lillian 


119 


Neiper, Caroline 


/6 


Edwin 


173 


John 


76 


Cora 


173 


Cassandra 


76 


Geo. E. 


173 


Newcomer, Howard K. 


80 


Mary E. 


173 


Lewis 


80 


Richard 


241 


Esther A. 


80 


Parke, Thos. 


12, I54 


Wendell B. 


80 


William 


154 


Sarah R. 


80 


Rachel 


154, I58 


Mary C. 


80 


Penn, William 22 


8l, l62, 193 


Noonan, Chas. 


127 


Pemberton, Israel 


24, 8l, 136 


Mabel 


127 


Parker, Jas. 


25,92 


Nock, Albert J. 


130 


Martha E. 


l80 


Nortan, Ann 


165 


Pownall, Moses 


6l 


Norris, John 


182 


Jos. D. C. 


6i,77 


Isaac B. 


182 


Moses W. 


77 


Annie 


1S2 


Jos. W. 


77 







Malcom 


77 




Vincent S. 


77 


Orr, Joseph 


37 


Ruth E. 


77 


O'Beil, Henry 


100 


Mary E. 


77 


Oxley, Sarah T. 


144 


S. Edna 


77 


Owens, Alfred T. 


182 


Phillip Jos. 


33 


Moses 


182, 183 


Pirn, Sarah 


46,87 


Susanna 


182 


Prang, Benj. 


64 


Alice 


182 


Mabel 


64 


Peter 


183 


Leary 


64 


Jane 


183 


Paul, Evan 


63 






Pennock, J. F 


62 


p 




Joseph, D. 


62 






Walker C. 


62 


Pennypacker, Samuel 


10 


Evan T. 


70 


Elizabeth 


165 


Martha W. 


116 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



309 



Preston, Coates 


56 


Carol 


56 


Mary 


56 


Deborah 


119 


M ah Ion 


120 


Thomas 


120, 12S 


Rebecca 


120 


William 


120 


Joseph 


120 


Jonas 


120 


David 


120 


Judith 


120 


Amos 


120 


Howard 


125 


Maria 


125 


Margaret 


125 


Caroline 


125 


Paine, Thos. 


8S 


Pugh, Lydia J. 


65 


Amos 


68 


Mary A. 


68 


Parry, Priscilla 


53 


Pierce, Sarah 


56 


Isaac 


56 


Hannah 


56 


Jennie 


129 


Geo. W. 


179 


Emma 


179 


Francis 


H9 


Mary 


179 


Henrietta 


179 


Elizabeth 


179 


Effa 


J 79 


Anna C. 


179 


Frances M. 


179 


Ethel 


179 


Ira 


179 


Edgar 


179 


Allen 


179 


Nora 


J 79 


Pilling, J. 


117 



Peck, Gertrude 


127 


Charles 


127 


Mary 


127 


Payne, Elizabeth E. 


126 


Pyle, Nathan 


60 


Nathan I. 


60, 76 


Jos. H. 


60 


Phebe J. 


60 


Edward E. 


60, 76 


Mary M. 


60, 76 


M. Alice 


60 


Hannah G. 


60, 76 


M.J. 


76 


Ethel 


76 


Geo. 


76 


Alfred 


76 


David 


76 


Havard 


76 


Benj. 


76 


Margaret 


76 


Nathan A. 


76 


Susanna 


3 


Ziba 


138 


John H. 


257 


Pearl E. 


2 57 


Leland J. 


257 


Packer, Rose 


89 


Pierson, Gideon 


89 


Paxan, Jacob 


105 


Phleming, Alice B. 


256 


Pownall, S. Edna 157, 258, 259, 


271,272. 




Penny, — 


254 


Pusey,, Elena 


38 


Ellis 


38 


Abigail 


3 1 


Mary B. 


68 


Samuel 


86 


Elwood 


72 


Franklin 


7 2 


Mary 


72 


Geo. C. 


72 


Franklin E. 


72 



310 



Index of Names. 



Patterson, Mary 




167 


Rossiter, Amos 






154 


Joseph 




167 


Mary 






165 


Eliza 




T 7i 


Samuel 






,65 


John 




171 


Polly 






165 


Cecelia 




171 


Roberts, Ann J. 






50 


Pidgeon, Isaac 




162 


John 






5° 


Rachel 




166 


Elizabeth 






50 


Elizabeth 




162 


Annie H. 






124 


William 




166 


Robinson, Thos. 20, 


21, 


22, 


154, 


Peters, Ora L. 




182 


156, 157, 164, 


165, 


167, 


i77 


Pinder, Alvina M. 


182 


238. 








Potts, Jos. 




183 


Moses 2i, 22, 


155, 


156, 


157, 


John 




.183 


165, 186, 241. 








Maria E. 




183 


Catharine 






40 


Elloise 




183 


Jas. 




40 


239 








Wm. 154, 155, 


156, 


167, 


226, 




Q 




237- 








Quick, William 




179 


Rachel 154, 


55, 


1G4, 


165, 


Jonah 
Russel 




180 
180 


166, 237, 238, 
Nicholas 154, 


239- 
i55> 


165, 


236, 


Charles 




180 


238, 239. 








Ailene 




180 


Mary E. 






J 54 


Edward 




180 


Rebecca 


i54 


155, 


167 


Ellis 
John 
Mitchell 




180 
180 
180 


Sarah 155 
Thos. Jr. 
Priscilla 155, 


,156 
158, 


J 57 
167, 


167 
155 
237, 


Anna 




180 


2 39- 








Lloyd 
Emily 


R 


180 
180 


Sarah C. 

Elizabeth 

Henry 

Ann 

Jane 






158 
165 
166 

167 
167 


Reed, Laura C. 




10 


Jos. W. 






167 


Homer 




131 


Chas. B. 






j 67 


Kersey 




131 


Chas. 






,67 


Thos. H. 




131 


Theodore 






167 


Sarah S, 




131 


Oscar 






167 


Laura, Jr. 




1 3 I 


Olive 






167 


Homer, Jr 




I3 1 


Frank 






167 


Isabel 




131 


Russell 






167 


Randolph, Mary 


A. 


i47 


Thos. E. 






167 


Rudolph A. 




"5 


Emitt 






167 



Gene ahoy of the Co cites Family, 



311 



Robinson, Elizabeth 


237, 


239 


John 


2 37, 


239 


Anna 


237 


239 


Samaria 




237 


Mary 


2 37, 


239 


Hannah 


237, 


239 


Jonathan 


237, 


239 


Letitia 




237 


Lydia 




239 


Hannah J. 




239 


Tacy 




234 


Samaria I. 




239 


Rogers 




20 


Dr. Albert 




122 


Col. John A. 




122 


Lucretia A. C. 




122 


Virginia S. 




122 


Chas. W. 




1 22 


Ann 




164 


Jonathan 




169 


Richard, Roland 




20 


Ruthanna 




60 


Isaac 




60 


Mary A. 




60 


Sarah A. 




119 


John 




,65 


Reese, Jacob 


161 


, 162 


Rodden, Elizabeth S. 




177 


Isaac 




177 


Sophia 




177 


Russel, Robt. 




35 


Elizabeth 




35 


Mary 




53 


Rebekah 




167 


Joseph 




167 


William 




167 


Susan 




167 


Anna 




167 


Charles 




167 


Romans, Clarissa 




64 


John 




64 


Mary 




64 



Richardson, Elizabeth 


35 


Mary 


165 


Lydia 


237 


Reynolds, Philena 


65 


Henry 


65 


Eliza 


65 


Mary 


65 


Richmond, Wm. 


111 


Chas. L. 


111 


Victor Hugo 


in 


Rich, Sarah A. 


75 


Wm. 


75 


Elizabeth 


75 


Ramsey, John R. 


76 


Robt. N. 


76 


Robt. E. 


76 


Janie A. 


76 


Hazel 


76 


Wm. 


168, 169 


S'aml. 


168 


Sarah 


168 


Harold 


168 


Chas. D. 


168 


Sara 


168 


Round, Thos. 


179 


Florence 


179 


Raymond E, 


179 


Ridgeway, Jos. 


"3 


Rebecca 


"3 


Mary 


"3 


Hannah 


113 


Ross, Tenny 


118 


John W. 


118 


Lewis T. 


118 


Mary E. 


118 


Mary 


118 


Hugh 


186 


Eliza 


186 


Roberta 


186 



312 



Index of Names. 



Righter, Jos. 


239 


John 


2 39 


Annie 


239 


Benjamin 


239 


William 


236 


Guy A. 


239 


s 




vScott, Annie 


256 


Franklin 


256 


Rachel 


256 


Walter W. 


256 


Streets, Priscilla W. 


10, 155, 157 


Dr. Thos. H. 


169 


Edward 


169 


Mary E. 


169 


Shafer, Lavenia 


10, 21 


Margaret 


24 


Spencer, Geo. 


151 


Harvey B. 


181 


Abraham 


1S1 


Sarah 


181 


Starkey, Beulah 


165 


Scott, Elizabeth 


167 


Stoope, Berton 


167 


Shenck, Carrie 


167 


Smeal, Rebecca 


I7 9 


Agnes 


1S0 


Shank, Frances 


194 


Sky 


18 


Schroyer, Samuel 


239 


Starr, James 13, 19, 20, 


35. 108,164 


Moses 


19, 20 


Rachel 


35> l6 4 


John 


108 


Eleanor 


108 


Isaac 


164 


Sarah 


161, 164 


' Rebekah 


164 


Ann 


164 


Amy 


164 



Starr, Benj. 


1 65 


Joseph 


165 


Nancy 


,65 


Anna 


165 


Elizabeth 


165 


Springer, Rufus H. 


184 


Jas. 


184 


Martha 


180 


Stephens, I. C. 


242 


Smout, Edward 


25,82, 136 


Jane 


25,82 


Sylvanus 


25,82 


John 


23, 82 


Lute 


24 


Sholfield, Geo. 


29 


Seltzer, J. Andrew 


33> s 3> 84 


Sutton, Alice 


65 


Sharpless, Mary 


35 


Anna 


64 


Jonathan 


93, 102, 105 


Rebecca 


108 


Benj. 


108 


Edith 


"5 


Wm. 


"5 


Smedley, Geo. 


35 


James 


53 


Thomas 


53 


Sarah 


53 


Emmor 


53 


Elizabeth 


53 


R. C, M.D. 


148 


Esther 


165 


Strickland, A. 


43 


Gertrude 


65 


Nimrod 


33 


Schlosser, John 


50 


Shrivery, Dennison 


64 


Norwood 


64 


Delmar 


64 


Strawbridge, Payn 


5S 


S trunk, Rebecca 


172 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



313 



Stubbs, Thos. 


53 


Smith, Nathan 


105 


Susanna C. 


53 


Chas. 


184 


Rebecca H. 


53 


Sloan, Susanna 


254 


Martha L., Jr. 


53 


Scarlett, Anna L. 


253 


Thomas N. 


53 


Wm. N. 


253 


John D. 


53 


Savery, Edward 


118 


Mary 


53 


Mary 


118 


John 


53 


Rebecca 


118 


Gilpin 


53 


Stecker, Peter 


239 


Elwood M. 


53 


Rachel 


239 


Jos. C. 


53 


Anna E. 


239 


Mary H. 


74 


Swayne, Benj. 


119 


Speckman, Ellis P. 


67 


Joel 


99 


Thomas 


67 


Sinkley, Albert 


119 


Lydia 


67 


Simmons, Deborah 


121 


John 


68 


Shreve, Dr. Solomon 


ii 1 


Nina 


68 


Dr. Thomas 


1 11, 112 


Snider, Clara 


62 


Chas. R. 


122 


Rebecca 


176 


Julia 


122 


Stewart, Jennie 


74 


Carter W. 


122 


Steele, Larkin 


7 9 


Fred 


122 


Nathaniel 


79 


Summers, Mary 


98,99 


Sarah 


79 


Spangler, Charlotte 


129 


Shoemaker, Chas. C. 


74 


Sperry, Maud 


129 


Jos. 


74 


William 


129 


Eveline 


74 


Emma J, 


129 


Alton 


74 


Stephens, Thaddeus 


131 


M. Ethel 


74 


Shelmander 


124 


Emeline 


73 


T 




Jesse A. 


74 




Arthur 


74 


Thompson, Joseph 


12 


Clifford 


74 


Ed mond 


25 


Stanley, Zachariah 


236 


Samuel J. 


76 


Stalker, Thos. 


89,92, 117 


Samuel 


76, 122 


Hannah H. 


92,93 


Ross S. 


76 


Grace 


92 


Cam 


72 


Thos. Jr. 


135 


Phebe 


77 


Jane 


135 


Daniel 


117 


Rebecca 


257 


Joel 


117 


Schivly, Asa 


105 


Alfred 


117 


Azarich 


105 


Annie 


117 


Stewardson Thos. 


99, 105 


Hannah 


"7 



3]4 



Index of Names 



Thompson, N. Roland 


117 


Thatcher, Abigail 


36 


Walter 


142 


Richard 


36 


Frank 


122 


Hannah 


36 


Tompkins, Ann 


251 


Susanna 


36 


Taylor, Abiah 


24 


Olive 


36 


Joseph 


50, 118 


Torbot, Saml. 


33. Si, 83, 84 


Anna A. 


79 


Tiffiney, Robt. 


35 


Richard H. 


79 


Turk, Mary 


165 


Lydia A. 


79 


Truman, Mary 


43 


Jacob 


106 


James 


43> IT 4 


Lydia 


113 


Elizabeth 


43 


Charles 


118 


Morris 


114 


Merritt 


11S 


Margaret 


114 


Clifford 


118 


Joseph 


114 


Mary 


118 


Wm. 


120, 137 


Raymond 


118 


Tyson, Isaac 


165 


Thomas 


118 


Trout, Benj. F. 


76 


Isaac 


167 


Isabella 


76 


Barnard 


177 


Clara M. 


76 


Tanguy, John 


256 


Wm. N. 


254 


Alfred 


256 


Eva M. 


254 


Ruth 


256 


Irene 


254 


Leland L. 


256 


Troth, Hannah S. 


"3 


Ruth E. 


256 


Henry 


113 


Taube, Emil 


70 


Hannah S. 


H3> ii4 


Tussy, Margaret 


251 


Jane 


114 


Thomas, Joseph 


27, S3 


Townsend, Anna C. 


US 


Sarah B. 


66 


Ruth 


115 


Jacob 


46,67 


Sarah 


125 


Rebecca J. 


67 


Lydia 


23S 


Abel Jr. 


46 


Amelia 


249 


Abner 


46 


Turner, Jas. 


184, 185 


Harry C. 


70 


Alexander 


184 


Philena L. 


70 


Mary 


184 


Adriana 


53 


William 


184 


Ann 
David 


i55 
155 


Caroline 


184 


Anna 


i55 


Brinton W. 


185 


Rebekah 


164 


Aris 


185 


Sarah 


165 


Mara 


185 


Mary 
Abel 


165 
165 


Jennie 


185 


Edward 


165 


Jos. E. 


185 


Ella W. 254, 


257, 272 


Jas. F. 


185 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



515 



u 



Umstad, Mary 

Dr. Henry 
Upton, John J. 
Uptegraff, Lydia 



Vickers, Mary K. 
Peter 
Ann 
Varley, John 
Valentine, John 
W. C. 
Emeline 
William 
Thomas 
Rebecca 
Micajah 
Edmond 
Jos. W. 
Davis 
Amelia 
Septeeni 

w 

Weldon, Susanna 
Benjamin 
Sarah 

Margaret B. 
Wm. T. 
Mary 

Wileman E. D. 
Abram S. 
Flora 
E. Darwin 
Esther, M.D, 
Owen A. 
Esther J 
Florence 
Anna M. 





Wisler, Wm. 


173 




Melissa 


173 


l 73 


Wynne, Thomas 


10 


*73 


Walker, Eliza 


10 


1S2 


Alexander 


15 


24S 


Eliza A. 


•5 




Moses 


22. ,63, 168 




Anna 


60,61 


91 


Hannah 


27 


91 


Asahel 


44 


91 


Rebecca 


44 


28 


Asahel W. 


61 


30, 167 
84, 88 


Jeramiah 
Wm. 


6i, 240 
6i 




Sarah Alice 


61 


123 


Susanna 


61 


*3 2 

136 
154 
167 


Phebe 


61 


Saml. 


61 


Joseph H. 


61,78 


167 


Margarett 


61, 62, 78 


167 
i67 


Saml. E. 


61 


Mary D. 


61 


Asahel C. 


62 


253 
253 


John E. 
Sarah 


62,78 
62, 168, 169 




L. Haines 


62 




Ruthanna 


62 


io, 12 


Haines K. 


62 


35 


E. Enfield 


62 


35 
69 


Joseph 62, 


155, 168, 169 


Margaret W. 


62 


69 


Stewart 


62 


69 


Sarah W. 


62 


io 


Susan P. 


62 


53 


Jos. C. Jr. 


62 


5S 


Wm. L. 


62 


5S, 73 


Jos. C. 


62 


58 


Mary C. 


62 


73 


James B. 


78, 169 


73 


Mary E. 


7* 


73 


Ann 


78 


73 


Wm. B. 


! 57 



516 



Index of Names. 



Walker, Lewis 


157, 168, 169 


Abel 


161 


Edward 


161 


Isaac 


168 


Thomas 


168 


Ellen D. 


168 


Mary 


168 


Hannamiah 


168, 169 


Priscilla 


168, 169 


Thos. R. 


168 


Elizabeth B. 


169 


Isaac P. 


169 


Fannie B. 


169 


Mary A. 


169 


Eliza C. 


i74, i75 


David 


174 


Ella V. 


175 


Winfield 


175 


Lewis 


J 75 


Jacob B. 


171, 175 


Hannah S. 


175 


Mary K. 


i75 


Wm. K. 


170 


Joseph 


171 


Lewis R. 


170 


Mary 


170 


Ella 


170, 171 


Chas. W. 


170 


Jos. J. 


170 


Jesse W. 


170 


Ellen 


170 


Elizabeth B. 


170 


Isaac P. 


171 


Percy E. 


171 


Emily E. 


171 


Fannie B. 


i7i 


Thomas R. 


171 


Jas. B. 


171 


Alice M. 


171 


Helen D. 


171 


Mary B. 


171 


James 


I7i 



Walker, Elwood 


240 


Ruth 


240 


Ernest 


240 


Irene 


240 


Alexander 


253 


Wells, Ella L. 


i7o 


Charles 


l7o 


Mary 


170 


Wattson, Samuel 


1 2 


Solomon 


15, 16 


Wagner, Laszides 


3o 


Weekstead, Richard 


33 


Worrell, Benj. 


37 


Lisanna 


249 


Israel 


251 


Walters, Geo. W. 


182 


Wain, Nicholas 


161 


Wilhelm, Catharine 


179 


Whennery, John C. 


40 


Woodward, Wm. 


3 2 > 119 


George 


33 


Howard N. 


73 


Joel 


73 


Phebe 


73 


Blanche C. 


73 


Ethel V. 


73 


Cora E. 


73 


Pauline M. 


74 


Willis C. 


74 


Howard E. 


74 


Fred V. 


74 


Harold J. 


74 


Helen K. 


74 


Phillip B. 


74 


John 


119 


Sarah 


ii9 


Samuel J. 


119 


Thomas 


119 


Rachel 


119 


Wm. H. 


128 



Genealogy of the Co ate s Family. 



317 



Walton, Isaac 


39 


Wood, Elenor C. 


54 


Joseph 


56 


Ellis P. 


54.68 


Brinton 


72 


Philena 


54 


Charles 


67 


Laura 


54 


David 


67 


Morris T. 


54,68 


Sarah 


67 


William N. 


66 


Clara 


67 


Joshua 


66 


Bertha 


77 


Eliza H. 


66 


Clayton 


77 


Annetta 


66 


Mary A. 


254 


Annie C. 


66,80 


Nathan 


254 


Alberta 


66, 80 


Eliza 


254 


Walter T. 


68 


Worley, John 109, 243. 244, 245, 


Mary E. 


68 


247, 248. 




Rebecca M. 


68 


Mary A. 


109 


Edith P. 


68 


Jacob 


109 


Leila M. 


69 


Caleb 


109 


Elizabeth H. 


69 


Asa 


109 


Aline 


124 


Eli 


109 


Rachel 


163 


Moses J. 


247 


Aaron 


165 


Williamson, Thos. 


33 


Warren, Jacob 


46 


James 


120 


Wright, Benj. 


46 


Hannah 


120 


Mary 


46 


Seymour 


120 


Benj. N. 


46 


Rachel 


120 


Jonathan 


161 


Lindley 


120 


John 


162 


Gilpin 


120 


Ada 


173 


El wood 


120 


Whiteside, Nellie 


57 


Taylor 


120 


Charles 


184 


Beulah 


120 


Mary E. 


184 


Ann 


120 


Walter 


184 


Sarah 


120 


Dora 


184 


Williams, Robt. 


35 


Montgomery B. 


184 


Edith 


68 


West, Amos 


242 


Mary 


73 


Whitaker, Edith 


46 


James 


149 


Walter, Brinton 


56, 185 


Hallie 


*79 


Benj. F. 


78 


Elizabeth 


252 


Laura 


78 


Wood, S. C. 
Thomas 


41,42 
42,53 


Maurice 

Margaretta 

George 


78 

78 

185 


Lydie 


53. 57, 6 8 


Hannah 


185 


John 


53 


Georgiana, M.D. 


185 



318 



Index of Names. 



Withrow, Emma 


58 


Webster, Phebe 


80 


Walmsley, Harriett E. 


59 


Mary 


80 


Wickersham, Elizabeth 


65 


Clarence 


So 


John 


65,81 


Ezra 


129 


Catharine 


65,81 


Anna 


129 


William 


81 


Frederic 


129 


Whitcraft, Capt. Jas. B. 


64 


Walter C. 


129 


Webb, Wm. 


60 


Elena 


129 


Henry C. 


60, 75 


Wm. S. 


129 


Anna 


60 


Walter T. 


129 


Margaret 


60 


Wrightman, Winfield 


122 


Geo. T. 


60, 7 1 


Watts, Harvey 


126 


Frederick 


75 


Seymona 


126 


Sarah 


75 


Carl 


126 


Ella C. 


75 


Wilson, Emery H. 


iiS 


Maud 


75 


Caroline L. 


123 


Florence D. 


75 


David 


23 6 «!37 


Joseph C. 


75 


Waters, Rebecca 


70 


Anna E. 


75 


Wm. B. 


70 


Comley 


75 


Mary C, 


70 


Comley E. 


75 


White, LauraC. 


75 


Sarah A. 


75 


Windle, Walter 


75 


Wallace, Edward C. 


62 


Wade 


238 


Edward M. 


78, 122 


Withers, Zebulan 


242 


Edgar P. 


73 


Way, John 


1 12 


Elizabeth L. 


73 


Benj. 


1 12 


John E. 


73 


Mary 


112 


Webster, Chalkley 


63 


Moses 


112 


Jesse 


63 


John B. 


1 12 


Elizabeth 


63 


Matilda 


I 12 


Eveline 


6 3, 79 


Jos. R. 


112 


Joseph 


6 3) 64, 80 


Ware, Saml. 


114 


Jesse E, 


63 


Sarah 


114 


Lilian 


63 


Emmalise 


114 


Idella 


63 


Amelia 


115 


Medora 


63,80 


Ward, Emeline 


147 


William 


64 


Hannah 


!6 5 


George 


64, 129 


Willett, Burgess 


I 3 


Linford 


64 


Elaine G. 


133 






Ceo. V. 


l8 3 


Marion 


64 


Delphene 


1S3 


Viola 


64 


Carroll 


i3 3 


Hibbard 


80 


Lyall 


183 



Genealogy of the Coates Family. 



319 



White, Clyde 
Worth, John 

Richard 

Anna 
Warner, Jos. C. 
Whistler, Thos. 
Welty, Wm. 

Lewis E. 

Laura J. 

Elvina E. 

Emma I. 
Wayne/Genl. Anthony 
Washington, Genl. 



nS 


Y 




l 35 






2 53 


Young, Joseph M. 


73 


253 


Ross 


73 


147 


Yerkes, Wm. H. 


112 


140 


Morris 


112 


184 


Hannah 


112 


184 


Yeatman, Marshall 


130 


184 


Jesse D. 


I30 


184 


Hannah D. 


130 


184 


Ralph M. 


r3o 


205 


Edith H. 


I3 1 


225 


Grace E. 


131 



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